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Friday, June 7


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#1 dirac

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Posted 07 June 2013 - 02:30 PM

Mr. and Mrs. Vladimir Putin praise performance of "Esmeralda," announce they are splitsville.

After the performance of "Esmeralda" at the Great Kremlin Palace, the two came into a luxurious room to speak to a reporter.

"Excellent. Great music, excellent production," Putin said and Lyudmila echoed his praise.


Related.

Speaking in a stilted but clearly staged interview on state television after a night together at the ballet, the couple said they had agreed to a "civilised break up" because they barely saw each other.

It appeared that a formal divorce had not yet taken place.


Related.

The Putins had just come from watching a performance of the ballet Esmeralda (based on The Hunchback of Notre Dame) in the Kremlin Palace theater when they staged their announcement in the form of a "spontaneous" interview with a state TV journalist. A much-repeated joke on Facebook Friday – which could become a self-fulfilling prophesy – is that Russian slang for "getting divorced" will in future be "going to see Esmeralda."


Related.

Divorce is common in Russia. Nearly 700,000 Russian couples dissolved their marriages in 2009, according to UNICEF. But Russian leaders, unlike their American counterparts, generally keep their domestic lives well out of public view and divorce among top officials in Russia is unprecedented.



#2 dirac

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Posted 07 June 2013 - 02:31 PM

A review of American Ballet Theatre by Joan Acocella in The New Yorker blog.

And then, speaking of Balanchine, there is the musicality of Ratmansky’s choreography. Not only do the steps answer to the score but, touchingly, they show you how excited Ratmansky was by the music. Bang! goes the orchestra. And bang!—a gang of eight men jumps in from the wings, legs out, thrilled and thrilling. Finally, a footnote: Ratmansky always seems to get terrific results from costume designers. In the first section of the ballet, “Symphony #9,” the women’s dresses (by Keso Dekker) had heavily gored skirts that, in pirouettes, opened like morning glories.



#3 dirac

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Posted 07 June 2013 - 02:42 PM

Reviews of Ballet Across America at the Kennedy Center.

The Washington Post

The first flakes fluttered prettily at the close of “Les Patineurs,” the infectiously uplifting ice-skating ballet by Frederick Ashton that, with a fresh, bighearted performance by the Sarasota Ballet, ensured its place as the jewel of this year’s “Ballet Across America” sampler of regional companies.


danceviewtimes

Cong’s solution to gender battles is stalemate, compromise – a wary jollity appears in the final stages of these klezmer waltzes. This is the closest thing to love and trust that the men and women of “First Waltz” achieve. Richmond’s cast – Cecile Tuzii, Phillip Skaggs, Lauren Fagone, Fernando Sabino, Shira Lanyi, Thomas Ragland, Valerie Tellmann, Trevor Davis – conveyed the transformations of feelings with finesse. Commendable was Tuzii’s solo. She brought ballerina authority to her role and one could, despite the long skirt, picture a richer use of the body than Cong seems to want.



#4 dirac

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Posted 07 June 2013 - 02:45 PM

A post-performance interview at the Kennedy Center with Iain Webb, Michael Kaiser, and Roy Kaiser.

For Webb, of course, that means drawing on the choreography of Great Britain's Sir Frederick Ashton, whose ballets he danced at the Royal and who was a personal mentor. Webb has brought nine Ashton ballets into Sarasota's repertoire since his arrival six years ago, and he was specially requested to bring "Les Patineurs" here because of the company's reputation for recreating his work.

"He's become almost a household name in Sarasota," said Webb, in response to a question from moderator Suzanne Carbonneau, a dance critic and faculty member at George Washington University. "I feel that we've got to remember the history while we push the present."



#5 dirac

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Posted 07 June 2013 - 02:47 PM

The English National Ballet inspires a scarf collection.

British artist Thomas Campbell spent 18 months working with the English National Ballet, drawing inspiration from the dancers’ sinewy figures and graceful moves for a series of paintings. Now these dreamy images can be part of your wardrobe, if not your art collection: Campbell has collaborated with Lily and Lionel, the brand worn by Elle Macpherson and Lily Allen, on a scarf series based on his pieces.



#6 dirac

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Posted 07 June 2013 - 02:51 PM

A review of the Houston Ballet by Margaret Putnam for TheaterJones.

The balletc onsists of three sections, and to keep the energy flowing, Balanchine throws in devilishly difficult steps for principals Sara Webb and Simon Ball, and interlaces their movements with a corps of 24 and three soloists. Balanchine’s gift is of simplicity and surprise, of repetition that breaks into something startlingly new, and—like fireworks on the Fourth of July—builds to a great climax at the end.

Jiří Kylián’s Sinfonietta offered a very different dynamic from Ballet Imperial: earthy, exuberant and free flowing.....



#7 dirac

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Posted 07 June 2013 - 02:57 PM

A review of the Bolshoi Ballet in 'Le Corsaire' by Alison Cotes for Crikey.

So rather than try and make sense of every scene, or twist and turn of the plot, it’s better to sit back and just luxuriate in the sheer magnificence of it all, because it’s all here. The showy pas de deux with the beautiful Medora and (in this version) her rescuer Conrad, made famous by Margot Fonteyn and a bare-chested Rudolf Nureyev as the slave Ali in 1962, here might not have quite the same rippling sexuality of that famous duo, but the difficult choreography is performed superbly and shows us all the tricks of the trade.



#8 dirac

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Posted 07 June 2013 - 02:58 PM

The Bolshoi's Australian season is a sell-out.

The Bolshoi Ballet's exclusive 2013 Australian season comprises 12 performances from 30 May to 9 June. The first production of the season was Le Corsaire, which opened to great acclaim. The Bright Stream is the second and final production of the season and starts tonight. Neither ballet has been performed in Australia before and is exclusive to Brisbane.



#9 dirac

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Posted 07 June 2013 - 03:01 PM

A review of ABT in 'Le Corsaire' by Mary Cargill for danceviewtimes.

But "Le Corsaire" is really all about the dancing, and the cast, led by Veronika Part and Cory Stearns, was absolutely terrific. Part is one of the most elegantly musical dancers at ABT, and she gloried in the lush choreography of the Jardin Animé, using her magnificent line and eloquent upper body to embody Petipa's idea of beauty triumphant. The fouettés in the grotto scene were impeccably fast singles, without extra flourishes (though she finished with a double). Medora's emotional range isn't wide, but Part managed to find them....



#10 dirac

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 07:41 AM

Members of American Ballet Theatre's corps de ballet are interviewed by Joseph Carman for Playbill.

How essential is the corps de ballet? They’re often on the stage eight times a week during the Met season, compared to once or twice as a norm for the principals. And they’re frequently tapped for soloist or principal roles, especially as the season wears on with inevitable injuries. Butler has danced the Cowgirl in Rodeo, for example, while Boyd has been featured in Paul Taylor works such as Airs and Black Tuesday. Scott has performed the Bronze Idol in La Bayadère, and Bragado-Young has frolicked on pointe as Bottom in The Dream.



#11 dirac

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 04:56 PM

A review of the National Ballet of Canada in 'Carmen' by Paula Citron in The Globe and Mail.

It’s clear why Ogden is beloved by choreographers. Her perfect ballet body absorbs movement like a dream. Unfortunately, the ballet is called Carmen, and without a strong Carmen, there is no ballet. In the short version, Ogden was able to carry off Carmen’s indifference and disdain, which seems to be Bombana’s vision of the gypsy). In the long version, Ogden is a cipher, a paint-by-numbers character lacking earthiness. She doesn’t smoulder. There is nothing raw.



#12 dirac

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 05:03 PM

Johan Kobborg leaves the ROH (again).

But after what the Opera House called “artistically differing approaches to the project” between the director Stefan Herheim and choreographer Johan Kobborg, Mr Kobborg has left the production, along with 32 dancers from the Royal Ballet, the Royal Ballet School and the Royal Danish Ballet.

Kasper Holten, the director of opera at Covent Garden, said: “Stefan and Johan couldn’t quite find a language together that would work. It just wasn’t possible to find a way that would satisfy all parties.”



#13 dirac

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 03:26 PM

Kevin Irving is appointed the new artistic director of Oregon Ballet Theatre.

 

Irving appears to have the combination of high-level dance background, management experience and international connections to help OBT recover from a period of organizational instability and continue to build its reputation among regional ballet companies. His career has included stints as a principal dancer with Les Grands Ballets Canadiens and Twyla Tharp Dance, and as rehearsal director and head of the artistic department for Spain's Compania Nacional de Danza. Since leaving Sweden, he's run a consulting business, taught at several top dance companies, and founded a non-profit that arranges international exchanges in dance. 

 




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