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Thursday, June 6


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#1 dirac

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Posted 06 June 2013 - 09:30 AM

The daughter of Britain's Education Secretary is pulled out of ballet classes over fears that she was developing a troubling preoccupation with her weight.

The Education Secretary’s wife, Sarah Vine, says she took the decision after Beatrice did not want to eat on the days that she was due to attend the dance lessons.

“It began when she mentioned that some of the girls in her group were better than her, even though they hadn’t been doing ballet as long, because 'they were more the right size’,” says Vine in her column for The Times.


Related.

The Education Secretary's wife, Sarah Vine, took the decision after Beatrice refused to eat on days of her lessons and insisted on wearing a smaller leotard.

She said what used to be an enjoyable way of exercising had turned into a 'stressful and somewhat sinister ordeal'.



#2 dirac

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Posted 06 June 2013 - 09:37 AM

New Orleans ballet mistress and teacher Mary Munro retires at age 82.

As a young aspiring ballerina, Mary Munro wasn’t about to allow illness stop her from taking over the principal role in Ballet Rambert’s “Giselle” in London in 1954. “I was 24 in London with the chicken pox when I received a call from Anton Dolin,” she recalled recently. “He was the director of Festival Ballet at the time. Apparently, his principal dancer, Tamara Toumanova, sprang her ankle and he wanted me to step in for her.”



#3 dirac

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Posted 06 June 2013 - 09:46 AM

A review of the National Ballet of Canada in "Carmen" by Michael Crabb in The Toronto Star.

Bombana first tackled Carmen in 2006 in a one-act version that the National Ballet presented three years later. Soon after, Bombana reworked it into the evening-length, two-act version that the National Ballet is currently performing. Those who saw the shorter rendering might well question whether making it longer makes it better.



#4 dirac

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Posted 06 June 2013 - 09:47 AM

Q&A with Greta Hodgkinson.

Carmen seems pretty far from [Giselle], both in terms of temperament, and in the actual dance style.

They are pretty far, in terms of the classics. Carmen is extremely physical, there’s a lot of rolling around on the floor, and it takes your body a while to get used to all of that: we’re used to being vertical. But one of the things I love in Giselle is the drama, and there’s always a little bit of drama in each role. It’s completely different, but it’s still a great story. And I’ve done Giselle for many, many years: This is the first time that I’m dancing Carmen, so I’m still discovering new things. It’s always nice to attack something new.



#5 dirac

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Posted 06 June 2013 - 09:54 AM

Reviews of Cojocaru's and Kobborg's farewell to the Royal Ballet in 'Mayerling.'

The Telegraph

But magnificent though Kobborg was, he was matched every step of the way by the detail of Cojocaru’s performance. The couple dance together so often that their limbs seem melded into the same instinctive shapes and her confidence in him allows her to take breathtaking risks in the twisting passion of MacMillan’s pas de deux. It seems impossible that she is flexible enough to slither around his body in the way she does; the effect is devastating.


The Arts Desk

He was 40 yesterday (and the audience lustily sang "Happy Birthday" to him at the end of the show) and he has suffered heavily for months from a back injury. All of that - age, pain, tiredness - he used to shattering effect in his performance. Stiff and jaded, his Rudolf had supped full of horrors like Macbeth, and he had sold his soul like Faust. I remember 20 years ago the nobility of Irek Mukhamedov’s Rudolf, crumbling under pressure, taking refuge in drugs; Kobborg’s was a man driving himself into the dark, stabbing at his arm with no excuses to make to himself.



#6 dirac

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Posted 07 June 2013 - 02:49 PM

Sebastian Serra of the Orlando Ballet talks about appearing on "So You Think You Can Dance."

Serra, who is 23, next will perform in the Las Vegas round, which airs at 8 p.m. Tuesday on WOFL-Channel 35.

"It's been awesome so far," he said of the show. "It's been so good. You will see in Vegas, it's a lot of fun getting to work with other choreographers, having to do all the types of dance. It was hard. I'm used to learning choreography, but it was super fast. You had to learn all of them in one hour and do them for the judges, which is really, really stressful."



#7 dirac

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Posted 07 June 2013 - 02:53 PM

A review of American Ballet Theatre in 'Le Corsaire' by Apollinaire Scherr in The Financial Times.

http://www.ft.com/cm...l#ixzz2VZdT0PBZ

Stager Anna-Marie Holmes, also guilty of American Ballet Theatre’s Raymonda, choreographs not by the yard but by the mile, with nary a step to delight or surprise and little to characterise the players. Not that character counts for much here. The plot, in which pirates kidnap and counter-kidnap lady slaves, pops up so rarely that it amounts to an intrusion.



#8 dirac

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Posted 08 June 2013 - 10:09 PM

A review of the School of American Ballet's workshop performance by Tobi Tobias in her blog, "Seeing Things."

As usual, the stagers had been dancers with the company though not necessarily at the principal level since performing in a ballet and passing the choreography on to the rising generation require somewhat different gifts. There were plenty of excellent dancers in action, but for me no single performers who were clearly destined for glory. Instead, let me name the soloists in both the matinee and evening presentations of Divert, as the dancers nickname it, the most important and challenging work on the program: Daniela Aldrich, Laine Habony, Jordan Miller, Clara Ruf-Maldonado, Mimi Staker, Patrick Frenette, Zachary Guthier, and Alejandro Ocasio.




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