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Tuesday, June 4


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#1 dirac

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Posted 04 June 2013 - 09:26 AM

A review of American Ballet Theatre by Robert Johnson in The Star-Ledger.

Extending the project now suggests a further attempt to vindicate this composer, whose compromises, evasions and collaboration with Soviet tyranny stained his reputation. Admiring the music is one thing, but hailing Shostakovich as a patriot is quite another and Ratmansky should make this distinction clear.



#2 dirac

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Posted 04 June 2013 - 09:28 AM

Comment on the departure of Alina Cojocaru and Johan Kobborg from the Royal Ballet by Sarah Crompton in The Telegraph.

The Royal will no doubt say that it has within its ranks dancers with great potential, and it is possible to spot a few who are undoubtedly worth keeping an eye on. But world-class dancers are born not made, and the star dust that Cojocaru and Kobborg sprinkled on all that they did does not look in plentiful supply.



#3 dirac

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Posted 04 June 2013 - 09:30 AM

A story on Misty Copeland by Matt Trueman in The Guardian.

......Copeland was 13 when she was spotted by ballet instructor Cynthia Bradley and took only four years to complete training that can last up to 17 years. Furthermore, she has an unusual physique compared with her peers: more muscular and curvaceous.

In autumn, Copeland suffered a black-line fracture to her left shin during rehearsals and faced surgery followed by several weeks of physiotherapy.



#4 dirac

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 03:19 PM

A review of the School of American Ballet workshop performanc and American Ballet Theatre by Robert Gottlieb in The New York Observer.

The credit for all this goes, of course, to the school itself, but more particularly to Suki Schorer, its senior teacher (she’s been a member of the faculty since 1972), whose 47 stagings for the workshop include four earlier Divertimentos. She brings a refinement to the dancers, an esprit, that was a hallmark of her own dancing back in the day. It’s easy to compare her stagings favorably with a lot of what we see at the company, so we have to bear in mind that the workshops have far more time to rehearse than the company does. Even so, it’s hard not to speculate on what City Ballet’s Balanchine would have been if Schorer had been a leading ballet mistress there through the last decades.



#5 dirac

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 03:22 PM

A review of the cinema broadcast of the Bolshoi Ballet in "Romeo and Juliet" by Alastair Macaulay in The New York Times.

The production felt woefully generalized when I watched it in live performance in the 1990s. Vincent Bataillon’s screen direction of Sunday’s presentation of the May 12th performance heightened the unspecific feeling by taking an exceptionally remote view of the action. Scarcely one close-up was used, and often solos were filmed with the figure not just seen full-framed but surrounded by all too much stage space.



#6 dirac

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 03:30 PM

Reviews of Pacific Northwest Ballet.

Seattle Weekly

With nods to the far and the recent past, Wheeldon’s new dance represents the current state of affairs in the ballet world. Taking its name from Joby Talbot’s percussion-driven score, Tide Harmonic is a work for four equal couples, but the eight people seem more like 80 at times. It’s a densely packed, hyper-mobile work, torquing the body into some complicated shapes and step-patterns. The dance explores the nature of water—not calm ponds or meandering streams, but surging waves and dangerous vortices. Occasionally Tide Harmonic slows slightly, especially for a twisty central duet with Grant and Carla Körbes, but the hiatus doesn’t last long.


Seattle Dances

Agon began the evening with its cool, avant-garde chic. Though it premiered in 1957 and is now an iconic work, the ballet seems perpetually modern. Balanchine’s choreography still startles with its definitive lines, flexed foot accents, shoulder shrugs, and indifferent formality, all accompanied by Stravinsky’s music. Perhaps it was just opening night jitters, but Friday evening saw several bobbles from the corps in both timing and execution. The soloists, however, fared better. Maria Chapman polished off a devilish turning sequence and, after Andrew Bartee and Jerome Tisserand rotated her through difficult balances en pointe, exited with a perfectly haughty air. Jonathan Porretta, fantastic as always, danced with particular vigor; he commands the viewer to watch him with insistent kicks pointing directly at the audience in the opening of his solo. Of all the dancers, Porretta seems to live and breathe Balanchine’s choreography with the most fluency......



#7 dirac

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 03:31 PM

A report on the Astaire Awards ceremony.

The evening at New York University’s Skirball Center for the Performing Arts was filled with dance performances — everything from tap to jazz to ballet. Highlights were Tiler Peck and Robert Fairchild of New York City Ballet in a haunting rendition of the “Carousel” pas de deux, choreographed by Warren Carlyle, and a reconstructed “Simply Irresistible” from the Broadway show “Contact,” performed by the American Dance Machine for the 21st Century. The New Jersey-based Art of Dance troupe offered a vibrant “Dancin’ Fool.”



#8 dirac

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Posted 06 June 2013 - 04:04 AM

Members of the Sarasota Ballet visit the Ballets Russes exhibit at the National Gallery.

Here were costumes by the likes of Léon Bakst, Pablo Picasso and Henri Matisse; there, strains of now immortal scores by Igor Stravinsky and Sergei Prokofiev. And everywhere among the dancers, a sense of reverence and awe for the lineage they are now responsible for safe-keeping.

For Artistic Director Iain Webb, a ballet history fanatic and avid collector, this was an essential sidetrip, dampened only by a reluctant acceptance that nothing could be taken home and added to his vast storehouse of memorabilia.



#9 dirac

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Posted 06 June 2013 - 09:49 AM

Olivia Bell returns to the stage after maternity leave.

Bell, a mother of three children under four, never doubted she would dance on after the birth of her daughter, Anouska, 16 months ago.

After 18 years with the ballet and acclaimed performances in coveted roles, Bell, 34, still has unrealised dreams.




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