Jump to content


Monday, June 3


  • Please log in to reply
14 replies to this topic

#1 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,892 posts

Posted 03 June 2013 - 11:34 AM

Alina Cojocaru and Johan Kobborg say bye-bye to the Royal.

The New York Times

Ms. Cojocaru, 34, was born in Bucharest, trained in Kiev, and joined the Royal Ballet in 1999. Mr. Kobborg, a Danish dancer, joined the company in 1991 and became a principal dancer in 1994. The two first worked together in 2001, when Ms. Cojocaru filled in for an ailing Miyako Yoshida in a production of “Romeo and Juliet,” in which Mr. Kobborg was dancing Romeo. That collaboration was the start of a storied partnership onstage and off, and that year Ms. Cojocaru was named a principal dancer.


The Guardian

As for Cojocaru, despite the unfortunate injuries which have dogged her career, she is one of the great ballerinas of our time: a classical dancer of luminous clarity, a dance actress of self-immolating intensity. Audiences clamour to see her Giselle, Juliet, Aurora or Tatiana, but it's notable how little new work Cojocaru has danced at the Royal. Some have criticised the Royal for this, but of course choreographers do make their own casting choices. In recent years, the most substantial new work created on Cojocaru has been by John Neumeier, at the Hamburg Ballet.


The Sarasota Herald-Tribune

Some of those "future plans," include the Sarasota Ballet, which previously announced that its final program of the next season would be "Johan Kobborg, Alina Cojocaru & Friends" (whatever that means) on April 25-26, 2014.



#2 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,892 posts

Posted 03 June 2013 - 11:37 AM

A review of American Ballet Theatre by Apollinaire Scherr in The Financial Times.


http://www.ft.com/cm...l#ixzz2VBRuq9kQ

Ratmansky escapes the cheesy self-regard of the typical tortured-artist ballet by suggesting that the creator is miserable more for susceptibility to the world than for standing aloof. The corps is dizzyingly present – weaving along the margins, shooting across the stage, eclipsing our hero with its bustle and collapsing like he does. Men lie down like corpses and women fold in on themselves, hands balled into fists, like constructivist Dying Swans before everyone abandons the artist and a muse to sudden empty space.


Deborah Jowitt reviews ABT for her blog.

Like all good muses, these have strengthened the unhappy hero. In the last part, he takes charge. He pushes the dancers in the ensemble around, breaks them into trios, then directs them to form a tableau. They oblige. The three principal women recline between the audience and the stage picture, watching. But this hero, unlike Balanchine’s Apollo is no god coming into his own. Slowly, deliberately, Hallberg walks offstage. As he fades away, the group lifts one of its women high, like a victory statue. The curtain falls. I’m still pondering this ballet; perhaps I’ll connect it in my mind to Shostakovich’s sometimes compliant, sometimes rebellious relationship to Stalinist repression and the friends and relatives he lost in the post-1936 purges. Hallberg managed his difficult part magnificently, and the women were expressive and lovely.



#3 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,892 posts

Posted 03 June 2013 - 11:39 AM

Photo gallery of Natchez Dance Theater's "Alice in Wonderland."

#4 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,892 posts

Posted 03 June 2013 - 11:40 AM

A preview of the Kennedy Center's "Ballet Across America" schedule by James D. Watts Jr. for Tulsa World.

And the first piece that will be performed will be a work by Tulsa Ballet resident choreographer Ma Cong, whose creation “Ershter Vals” will be performed by the Richmond (Va.) Ballet.



#5 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,892 posts

Posted 03 June 2013 - 11:42 AM

A feature on Misty Copeland in the Atlanta BlackStar.

For starters, Copeland, a native of San Pedro, California, grew up in extreme poverty. She didn’t even know what ballet was when she was spotted by an instructor at her local Boys and Girls Club at 13.

Which brings up another unlikely fact in Copeland’s life — she didn’t even begin training in ballet until her early teen years.



#6 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,892 posts

Posted 03 June 2013 - 01:07 PM

A review of Houston Ballet by David Clarke for Broadway World.

Katherine Precourt and Linnar Looris moved with resoundingly regal grace and fluidity at Sunday's performance, mesmerizing the audience with their charm and poise. Kelly Myernick danced her role with dignified elegance. Jessica Collabdo, Nao Kusuzaki, William Newton, and Brian Waldrep were all brilliant in their featured dances as well. The large corps de ballet for the production danced with stunningly smooth movements that impressed and beguiled the audience.



#7 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,892 posts

Posted 03 June 2013 - 01:12 PM

President Mursi of Egypt once declared dance unconstitutional.

An online video of the interview has recently resurfaced on social media where Mohamed Mursi condemned a dance school saying “What is this school? What is its role? What are its goals?”

“This school, with the known concept of dancing, violates the constitution's article II,” Mursi told Egyptian presenter Wael Abrashi on Dream TV 8 years ago.



#8 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,892 posts

Posted 03 June 2013 - 01:16 PM

A review of Pacific Northwest Ballet by Moira Macdonald in The Seattle Times.

Christopher Wheeldon’s “Tide Harmonic,” making its world premiere with Pacific Northwest Ballet Friday night, began and ended with its dancers in black silhouette; the lighting, wonderfully realized by Randall G. Chiarelli, elongated their figures and made them mysterious, like night creatures dancing in the shadows. Though the light quickly becomes brighter — we see the cast of eight clad in shades of marine blue, with just a hint of kelp-like tendrils — the dance still seems to be taking place in shade; the dancers, particularly in the central section, seem to be moving through water, finding an occasional shimmer of light.



#9 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,892 posts

Posted 03 June 2013 - 01:18 PM

A review of the School of American Ballet workshop performance by Alastair Macaulay in The New York Times.

Isabella LaFreniere, who led Saturday afternoon’s performance, is one of this year’s three winners of the School’s Mae L. Wien Awards; the others are Daniela Aldrich and Jordan Miller, who both danced in “Divertimento No. 15,” Ms. Aldrich in its most brilliant role. Ms. LaFreniere is a tall, imposing dancer of terrific rhythmic power; although her performance at this matinee was diminished by a couple of small slips, hers is a real talent.



#10 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,892 posts

Posted 03 June 2013 - 01:20 PM

Dance/NYC sponsors a new campaign to spotlight the city's dance scene.

The campaign is indicative of how recent successful efforts for political candidates and ballot initiatives, which appeared primarily online and in social media rather than in traditional media like television, are influencing other forms of advertising.

Lane Harwell, executive director of Dance/NYC, tips his hat to New Yorkers for Marriage Equality, an initiative by the Human Rights Campaign that was centered on dozens of video clips featuring residents of New York State, famous and otherwise, urging support for same-sex marriage rights in the state. The video campaign was cited as a reason the state approved same-sex marriage in 2011.



#11 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,892 posts

Posted 03 June 2013 - 01:22 PM

A preview of Les Ballets Eloelle in The Malay Mail.

Choreographed by Victor Travino, former principal dancer with Les Ballets Trockadero, and artistic director of Les Ballets Grandiva, the show ranges from Le Grand Pas de Quatre, originally choreographed by Pugni, to Fokine’s Dying Swan, to the show’s tour de force finale, Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake – with a few other stops along the way!



#12 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,892 posts

Posted 03 June 2013 - 11:31 PM

A look at the Martins regime at New York City Ballet by Robert Greskovic in The Wall Street Journal.

Apologists responding to criticisms of his poor hand at choreography, his taste in dancers—any number of whom now at the company’s top level strike me as possessing at best a soloist-level impact—and his commissioning of new works will invariably argue that at the very least Mr. Martins has kept the company going. To which I say: Who’s to say that someone else could not have done as well or, in fact, far better?



#13 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,892 posts

Posted 06 June 2013 - 04:01 AM

Julie Kavanagh's new book is a biography of the Lady of the Camellias. (Scroll down.)

Duplessis was a country girl who ran away to Paris when she was thirteen and transformed herself into the city’s premier courtesan. She captured the imagination of some of the major artists of her day, including Dumas and Liszt, and she inspired Verdi’s “La Traviata.



#14 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,892 posts

Posted 07 June 2013 - 02:55 PM

A review of the Bolshoi Ballet in 'Le Corsaire' by Deborah Jones in The Australian.

The whole ballet could, in fact, be seen as a bouquet to the art of the ballerina. The men's big dance moments are fleeting and Vladislav Lantratov as Medora's pirate lover Conrad had an ordinary night, failing to deliver the thunderous impact one hoped for in his big solo. Alexandrova has a vivid, warm stage presence and the most beautiful arms, although didn't quite scale the heights of grandeur called for in Le Jardin Anime. Kaptsova's quick precision and spark lit up the stage and the Odalisques pas de trois was illuminated by Maria Vinogradova's quiet radiance and exquisite line.



#15 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,892 posts

Posted 13 June 2013 - 03:38 PM

The English National Ballet's chief executive bows out after three months on the job.

 

Replacing Napier as interim chief executive is former BBC chief operating officer Caroline Thomson.

 




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


Help support Ballet Alert! and Ballet Talk for Dancers year round by using this search box for your amazon.com purchases (adblockers may block display):