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Thursday, May 30


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#1 dirac

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Posted 30 May 2013 - 05:23 PM

Benoit-Swan Pouffer resigns as the artistic director of Cedar Lake Contemporary Ballet.

Alexandra Damiani, the Cedar Lake ballet master, will oversee the company during the transition and will be responsible for its American and European performance season. The 2013-14 season includes engagements in Europe, the United Kingdom and Australia, with summer performances at Massachusetts’s Jacob’s Pillow and France’s Montpellier Festival. Two highlights of the season are the company premiere of “Rain Dogs,” by Johan Inger, a new repertoire work by Emanuel Gat and a new full-length program by Angelin Preljocaj.



#2 dirac

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Posted 30 May 2013 - 05:26 PM

Things are looking up for ballet, writes Roslyn Sulcas in The New York Times.

Why does one era suddenly seem full of possibility when another feels moribund? There are many factors that might have contributed to the sudden sense that these are exciting times for ballet. The post-Balanchine generation was perhaps so firmly in the shadow of the master that it was almost impossible to re-imagine where the art form could go. Other factors that have contributed to a new vitality in ballet include modern technologies that provide access to works across the world; the possibilities of collaborating across continents and disciplines; a new interest in movement and performance in the visual arts; and a very contemporary sense that the rules of classical ballet are permeable and elastic.



#3 dirac

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Posted 30 May 2013 - 05:28 PM

Reviews of New York City Ballet.

The New York Times

Wednesday at City Ballet was also part of the NYCB Art Series, sold out at $29 a seat, drawing a largely unfamiliar audience to the David H. Koch Theater: a sequel to a similar event held in the winter season and again with no orchestra (tape or musical soloists are used) and featuring an installation by the Brooklyn-based artists Faile. Their kitschy, glaringly cartoonlike screens have been placed around foyers of the theater, and sculptured, body-height columns are placed around the main upstairs foyer (you can turn them to look at different pictures........

At intermissions and afterward, rock music was played in the main upstairs foyer; the principal dancer Sébastien Marcovici, an experienced disc jockey, was in charge. All of which takes old City Ballet regulars out of their comfort zone....


The Financial Times

http://www.ft.com/cm...l#ixzz2UpUZP5ZN

The evening began with faux avant-gardism. Richard Tanner’s 1982 duet Sonatas and Interludes imagined its impish, open-hearted John Cage score as a straitened, shrunken thing; Ulysses Dove’s 1994 quartet Red Angels mistook the late Balanchine strain of ballet for posturing. For dessert we were served pseudo-populism – Peter Martins stripping Ray Charles of soul in his endless 1988 A Fool For You. But, for 15 blessed minutes mid-show, we got a break from the awfulness.


danceviewtimes

Richard Tanner's "Sonatas and Interludes", to prepared piano music by John Cage, is similar in feel to the Dove work, though where Dove is red and hot this is white and cool. Sara Mearns and Amar Ramasar twist and turn rather aimlessly and then they stop. Mearns, though, is apparently incapable of making anything look uninteresting, and gave the stop and start choreography unexpected dynamics. Ramasar, while he didn't plumb the depths that Mearns was able to find, was smooth and flowing, making the most of the quirky moves.



#4 dirac

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Posted 30 May 2013 - 05:38 PM

Merrill Ashley coaches the Houston Ballet.

"You must turn out ladies," Ashley says the women of Houston Ballet, while they are furiously dancing through the ballet's super speedy moves. Ashley would be first tell you that this is not an easy ballet. The celebrated ballerina set Ballo della Regina on the company in 2010.



#5 dirac

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Posted 30 May 2013 - 05:40 PM

A story on Devon Carney's appointment as the artistic director of Kansas City Ballet by Chris Waddington in The New Orleans Times-Picayune.

..... Carney, who graduated from De La Salle High School in 1978, began his dance studies in New Orleans under local ballet icon Harvey Hysell. As a teen, he performed with Ballet Hysell and New Orleans Ballet.

In his early career, Carney developed an international reputation as a soloist, while serving as a principal dancer at Boston Ballet. He later became ballet master for the acclaimed Boston troupe.



#6 dirac

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Posted 30 May 2013 - 05:43 PM

An interview with Sergei Polunin.

This apparent need for freedom and recognition above and beyond that afforded by the company cropped up again recently. “In Russia, no one takes any notice of what people without status think, but in London their opinion is valued,” he said, after being run to ground in Moscow by Izvestia.

“The system is built on the fact that they are a team and there are no separate individuals. In human terms that’s good, but in the end it’s not good for art. They often keep a talented artist at the same level as everyone else; they don’t let them show what they can do.”



#7 dirac

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Posted 30 May 2013 - 05:46 PM

A feature on street art by Brian Chidester in The American Prospect.

The NYCB opened its archive to the artists, who transformed vintage depictions of Tanaquil Le Clercq, the ballet company's most celebrated dancer from the 1940s, into a kind of Wonder Woman, her glowing wingspread stenciled with a coterie of neon colors that suggested not superhuman physicality so much as the crushingly unstoppable ascendency of DIY culture. How you feel about that is entirely your choice.



#8 dirac

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Posted 30 May 2013 - 05:46 PM

Astaire Award nominees.

This year, The Astaire Awards will also honor dance legend Marge Champion with its Douglas Watt Lifetime Achievement Award and special presentation by Harry Belafonte. Ted Chapin will be presented with a brand new award, Outstanding Achievement in the Preservation of Musical Theatre. Choreographer Warren Carlyle will present the pas de Deux from The New York Philharmonic’s performance of CAROUSEL with New York City Ballet’s Robert Fairchild and Tiler Peck as part of this tribute.



#9 dirac

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Posted 03 June 2013 - 01:14 PM

Pacific Northwest Ballet dress rehearsal photo gallery.

Dancers practiced during the final dress rehearsal for the Pacific Northwest Ballet’s performance of the upcoming "Director's Choice" at McCaw Hall.



#10 dirac

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 03:27 PM

An interview with Michael Massey, the composer of the score for Madison Ballet's 'Dracula.'

I know that your camaraderie with W. Earle Smith, Madison Ballet's artistic director, was also important. Did he want a rock score from the outset?
It was always a rock score in his vision, but I think the definition of "rock score" evolved as we worked together. Originally there were a couple of ideas. One was using established rock songs, buying their rights and redoing them. Led Zeppelin and the like. I convinced [Smith] to stay local. I sent him some ideas, which turned out to be right up his alley. But the cooperation is what was really integral to Dracula's success.



#11 dirac

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 04:43 PM

An excerpt from James Wolcott's new Kindle single, "Wild in the Seats."

Diaghilev didn’t shy away from controversy. A polished provocateur, an upper-crusty P.T. Barnum (a 2009 exhibition of Ballet Russes memorabilia was titled “Diaghilev’s Theater of Marvels,” very Barnum-esque), he invited it, reveled in it—it was vitalizing. “Etonne-moi!” Diaghilev would instruct Cocteau when he set about to write the scenario for the ballet Parade (designed by Picasso)—“Astonish me!” Astonishment begins in the eyes, with a pop of wonder, but The Rite of Spring went for the solar plexus, leaving much of the opening night audience not so much astonished as aghast.



#12 dirac

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Posted 16 June 2013 - 11:35 AM

Q&A with Alexandre Hammoudi.
 

 

Time Out New York: Did you start training at the Paris Opera?

Alexandre Hammoudi: No, no, not at all. I actually never went there. All of my teachers did. Max Bozzoni was a big principal; he did all the [Serge] Lifar ballets in the Paris Opera, and he is the teacher who made Patrick Dupond, basically; if we have a mentor, somebody we learn from, I pretty much learned from him. And it wasn’t that much about technique. It was a very old-school way of going about ballet and steps and movement, because I had zero discipline at that age. I was wild and full of energy and he was like, “Dance, dance, dance.”

 

 




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