Jump to content


This site uses cookies. By using this site, you agree to accept cookies, unless you've opted out. (US government web page with instructions to opt out: http://www.usa.gov/optout-instructions.shtml)

Thursday, May 23


  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,474 posts

Posted 23 May 2013 - 01:01 PM

A review of New York City Ballet by Rhys Loggins for Broadway World.

In A Place for Us, Wheeldon continues to show us exactly what is wrong with most contemporary ballets and what makes his the best. Place is crisp and clean. The costumes are simple and the dancing is demanding. The work is pure and unaffected, quite the opposite of Millepied's ballet. Tiler Peck was stunning in Place. It was nice to see her dancing in a piece in which she could truly shine.



#2 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,474 posts

Posted 23 May 2013 - 01:17 PM

The Eifman Ballet brings "Rodin" to Toronto.

Eifman explains his attraction to the subject as twofold. "Rodin's personality has been always very close to me. First of all, Rodin worked with the human body to express the most complex emotional states and philosophical ideas by means of plastique. He has solved the same creative tasks as a choreographer. The only difference is that if Rodin's sculptures are the frozen marvellous moment, then we disclose this moment in dynamics. We saturate it with dance energy."



#3 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,474 posts

Posted 23 May 2013 - 01:18 PM

A review of Boston Ballet in 'Coppelia' by Mehron Kugler for The Bay State Banner.

This latest production was leaps and bounds ahead of its 2010 debut in bridging the gap between the “high art” world of physical finesse and the audience. No translation was needed for much of the physical dialogue; Boston Ballet’s directors and choreographers have greatly improved their dancers in the art of communication. In some places, the gesturing was too emphatic and the meaning was lost, or lacked backstory, but overall, the audience was very much entertained.



#4 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,474 posts

Posted 23 May 2013 - 01:20 PM

Video clip of Moscow Ballet La Classique rehearsing their Nutcracker.

Moscow Ballet La Classique was founded 23 years ago by director Elik Melikov and is performing in New Zealand until the end of the month as part of their tour of Australasia.



#5 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,474 posts

Posted 23 May 2013 - 01:31 PM

A review of the "Diaghilev and the Ballets Russes" exhibit at the National Gallery by Alastair Macaulay in The New York Times.

Although I’ve watched Diaghilev ballets and visited Diaghilev exhibitions for more than 30 years, this show added to my knowledge, and gave several old thrills new intensity. It bestows equal honor to ballets that have stayed in repertory, from “Petrouchka” to “Prodigal”; it illumines several that did not survive Diaghilev’s death (and the subsequent closing of the company) in 1929, including “The Blue God,” “Ode” and “The Ball.” What’s more, some of its most poetically marvelous designs and costumes belong to productions that even histories of the Ballets Russes often overlook.



#6 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,474 posts

Posted 23 May 2013 - 01:33 PM

Radio station WRTI invites listeners to create videos with "The Rite of Spring" as accompaniment.

One of the centerpieces of our Rite week is an invitation to professional artists and the public alike: Take the last minute of Stravinsky's inimitable score — in an exceptional performance by conductor Valery Gergiev and the Mariinsky Orchestra (see the audio below) — and create a new video to go along with this music.



#7 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,474 posts

Posted 23 May 2013 - 01:35 PM

Saratoga Springs offers various events celebrating Rite.

For dance enthusiasts, there is a new exhibition at the National Museum of Dance titled A Riotous Work: A Centennial Celebration of the Rite of Spring. The show, which runs through November 24, examines the original ballet as well as the numerous and diverse choreographers and companies that have since re-envisioned the work. Companies and choreographers featured in the exhibit include Maurice Bejart, Molissa Fenley, Andonis Foniadakis, Martha Graham Dance Company, Heddy Maalem, Paul Taylor Dance Company, and the The Royal Danish Ballet.



#8 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,474 posts

Posted 23 May 2013 - 01:38 PM

The dissolution of the Metropolitan Opera's ballet troupe is noted by Classicalite.

Most of the Western world's biggest opera companies--London's Royal Opera, Paris Opera, La Scala in Milan--do indeed have in-house ballet troupes. Of course, in addition to dancing for opera, these ballet groups also have their own performance season.



#9 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,474 posts

Posted 24 May 2013 - 10:58 AM

Devon Carney is Kansas City Ballet's new artistic director.

Carney will replace William Whitener, a former dancer with the Joffrey Ballet and the Twyla Tharp Dance Company, who spent 17 years as artistic director in Kansas City. Under Whitener’s leadership, the company built a repertory filled with modern ballets from the likes of Tharp, Paul Taylor, Vicente Nebrada, Bob Fosse and Jessica Lang.


Related.

As ballet master at Boston Ballet, and then ballet master in chief at Cincinnati Ballet, Carney earned a reputation for his clear observations and thoughtful classes. Since 2008, he’s been the associate artistic director of Cincinnati Ballet.



#10 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,474 posts

Posted 24 May 2013 - 11:04 AM

Texas Ballet Theater will perform with the Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra for the first time in years.

In late 2008, the TBT, North Texas’ only resident professional ballet company, suffered a near-fatal fall. It started with an August admission that year that it would need to raise $70,000 in new funds or give up its long-planned fall tour of China. The company fell short, and what ensued were: an admission that the ballet was an estimated $850,000 in debt; that it would have to cancel the use of live music for its performances in Fort Worth and Dallas; and that if it did not gin up $2 million by year’s end, it would likely have to shut its doors. Thanks to the energetic fundraising efforts of the ballet dancers and the last-minute largesse of several private donors, the ballet reached its goal.



#11 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,474 posts

Posted 25 May 2013 - 09:00 PM

A review of Scottish Ballet in "Highland Fling" by Bill Coles for The Huffington Post UK.

There is something utterly hilarious about the combination of this classical music with the in-yer-face loutishness of Scottish street punks. There they all are in the club toilets, just like we've seen them a hundred times before, as the women preen in the mirrors, and the men squeeze their spots and pull wedgies and piss on the guy next to them in the urinal.



#12 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,474 posts

Posted 25 May 2013 - 09:28 PM

An interview with Isabella Boylston. Thanks to Marga for sending in the link!

The biggest change for Boylston this year is the absence of her former mentor and coach, Susan Jaffe, who left ABT to take the position of Dean of Dance at UNC's School of the Arts. Boylston is now working with Irina Kolpakova about whom she said, "I feel really lucky to work with her because she has such a wealth of knowledge and she's also very loving and warm as well as demanding. But it's different. Susan and I were so close. Since she left it's been more up to me to find my own way."....



#13 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,474 posts

Posted 27 May 2013 - 11:34 AM

Q&A with SAB students Isabella LaFreniere and Clara Miller on dancing Walpurgisnacht Ballet in the workshop performance.

Time Out New York: What was the process to learn it?
Isabella LaFreniere: We first watched videos of Suzanne Farrell and Kyra Nichols doing it, and we learned the steps and tried it ourselves and then Susie [Susan Pilarre, who staged the ballet] added our own little touches to it. Clara and I even do different arms with our partners just to make it feel more comfortable and so that we’re not exactly copying. We’re showing our own little interpretation of it.

Clara Miller: I can’t do one step that Isabella does because my arms just get all whacked out of proportion, so today I asked Susie if I could change it, and she was like, “Oh yeah—definitely change it if you can’t do it.” It’s in the variation when you’re going back in the attitudes—instead of doing two back attitudes, I changed the second one to a front attitude. That was in one of the versions I saw; it’s easier for me to stay on balance.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


Help support Ballet Alert! and Ballet Talk for Dancers year round by using this search box for your amazon.com purchases (adblockers may block display):