California

Principal vs. Principle

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to add to the list of unintentionally comic misspellings, the National Ballet of Canada posted a photo to their facebook page of a ballerina sowing [sic] her pointe shoes...

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Hmmm. I read it as the same tense - bodies are clamped and then are slid.

Yes, I thought the choreographer slid them apart. They did not slide of their own volition. A subtle comment on Martins' use of dancers? happy.png

I only intended a comment on Gottlieb's quoting - via his copy-editor's sloppy work? - "part" instead of "apart" and now I'm wondering how I got into this...

Ah. I misinterpreted the italicization of "apart" in your original post. I thought that the use of the italic was meant to draw attention to the "a" in "apart" in the original quote, not as an indication that the "a" had been omitted in the quote as printed in Gottlieb's piece.

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kbarber:

the National Ballet of Canada posted a photo to their facebook page of a ballerina sowing [sic] her pointe shoes...

Dancer do sow steps.

I always hesitate at peek and peak. At some point these things are like grammatical odette/odile choices.

Here's a dubious apostrophe in San Francisco. Maybe the o' threw the sign painter off.

(At Tumblr but in the safe section) http://canariesinthe...age/51495304101

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And then we get into the pet peeve department; one of mine happens to be pled/pleaded in news reports....

Just out ofcuriosity and wandering even further off topic, what about pled/pleaded bothers you? Using both forms in the same article? Using one form instead of the other? (In which case, which form don't you like?)

Unless I need to adhere to a style guide that says otherwise, I'm a "pled" girl myself. :)

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I always hesitate at peek and peak.

"Peek" and "see" both have a double "e" -- maybe that will help.

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I always hesitate at peek and peak.

"Peek" and "see" both have a double "e" -- maybe that will help.

and if that doesn't help, so does "leer"smile.png

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And then we get into the pet peeve department; one of mine happens to be pled/pleaded in news reports....

Just out ofcuriosity and wandering even further off topic, what about pled/pleaded bothers you? Using both forms in the same article? Using one form instead of the other? (In which case, which form don't you like?)

Unless I need to adhere to a style guide that says otherwise, I'm a "pled" girl myself. smile.png

interesting. it's one of those US (pled) vs Brit (pleaded) differences

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Oxford does list pled as the North American or Scottish variant, though Merriam-Webster also gives pleaded as its first choice. "Begged and pleaded" does make more sense than "begged and pled," at least from a euphonic standpoint.

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I always hesitate at peek and peak.

"Peek" and "see" both have a double "e" -- maybe that will help.

and if that doesn't help, so does "leer"smile.png

Indeed!

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