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Saturday, May 18


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#1 dirac

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 11:14 PM

Two reviews of the Eifman Ballet in "Rodin."

The Chicago Tribune

It sounds hokey, and might have been, but Eifman, no stranger to going overboard, manages here a series of living allusions to various Rodin works that make for impressive, original dance imagery. His musical selections, meanwhile, are deliciously choice, pieces by Rodin's fellow Frenchmen Camille Saint-Saens, Maurice Ravel, Claude Debussy and Erik Satie. They're mostly chestnuts, sure, but they make for a great score: Where else would you see a choreographed pillow fight, enacted by inhabitants of an asylum, accompanied by Saint-Saens' scrumptious "Danse Macabre"?


The Chicago Sun-Times

There are sequences in this ballet that instantly imprint themselves in memory: The shapeless mass of nearly nude bodies that gradually are prodded into defined shapes as an arm, a foot, a head, and finally full igures emerge; the famous sculpture of "The Kiss" that takes form literally and figuratively as Rodin and Camille embrace; the monumental tableaus of the artist's studio, with silhouetted laborers positioned on scaffolding; the framework for "The Gates of Hell" against which Rodin flings himself; a raucous, deconstructed can-can. The large ensemble sections showcase the power of the corps, but this work is really about a tormented triangle.



#2 dirac

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 11:17 PM

The philanthropist Patsy Tarr tells The New York Times about her Sunday routine.

TO THE BALLET. By 1, everyone is ready for a nap. But if there’s a matinee, I’m back out the door by 2. The American Ballet Theater spring season is always incredible because they import these fabulous Russian ballerinas. I just go alone, sit in my seat and leave when I feel like it.



#3 dirac

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 11:20 PM

A review of Ballet West by Kathy Adams in The Salt Lake Tribune.

If the ultimate goal of BW’s "Innovations" program is to produce an important choreographer from within its ranks, Ruud just might be it. Ruud’s first ballet, fortuitously titled "One," debuted at Ballet West’s first annual Innovations program in 2008. In 2011 he premiered "Trapped," and in 2012 Ruud was awarded a Fellowship Initiative grant from the New York Choreographic Institute to create a new ballet. Last October as the new director of BW II, Ruud showed an impressive work-in-progress for the BW II dancers titled "Without Fall," which I look forward to seeing as a finished ballet.



#4 dirac

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 11:22 PM

A review of the Boston Ballet by Iris Fanger in The Patriot-Ledger.

Jeffrey Cirio, the leading male dancer of the company, was cast as Frantz, matching Kuranaga in size and energy. He brings his amazing musicality and personality to the role, as well as his skills as an actor. We can readily believe he’s not only in love with Swanilda, but equally attracted to Coppélia the doll, set alluringly up on the balcony that hangs over the village square. With a gleam in his eye, Frantz blows kisses to the inanimate creature, just out of reach.



#5 dirac

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Posted 18 May 2013 - 11:27 PM

An interview with Garry Stewart about his unusual new work for Australian Ballet commemorating the 25th anniversary of Parliament House.

The creative director of the Centenary of Canberra celebrations, Robyn Archer, has asked him to choreograph a work about the building itself: a ballet about a famous building that references the politicians who do battle within its walls (hence the spiky choreography). It's a curious concept, one that the AB's publicity department addresses head-on. "Writing about music is like dancing about architecture," reads the first line of the press release. "A seemingly difficult task." It is the first time the contemporary choreographer has worked with a classical Australian ballet company, and the challenge is daunting.



#6 dirac

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Posted 20 May 2013 - 09:41 AM

A review of the Grand Rapids Ballet Company's 'Romeo and Juliet' by Jeffrey KaczmarczykThe Grand Rapids Press for The Grand Rapids Press.

The production Radacovsky created for Grand Rapids Ballet in May 2011 is the same with a vocabulary as much athletic and contemporary as it is classical and refined with women dancing on demi pointe and men wearing slacks, a look that’s more “West Side Story” in New York City than “Romeo and Juliet” in Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre in London.



#7 dirac

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Posted 20 May 2013 - 09:43 AM

A review of Dance Theatre of Harlem by Ellen Dunkel in The Philadelphia Inquirer.

But the piece sometimes looked under-rehearsed, with arms and legs not always synchronized, and couples moving at different times. The subject and the music also begged for far more emotional involvement and larger movements than the dancers delivered.

They did deliver, however, on the next piece, Balanchine's "Agon," set to Stravinsky, a leotard ballet that demands precision....



#8 dirac

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Posted 06 June 2013 - 04:08 AM

A review of Whim W'Him by Michael Upchurch in The Seattle Times.

Set to a Vivaldi score, “L’Effleure” opens with Bartee in gleaming half-silhouette (the title, as the program explains, is a play on the French words for “flower” and “one who has been gently touched, caressed”). The variety, control and detail of his actions, as he unspools himself in response to the music, are truly mesmerizing. There’s a latent violence in his eddying elegance, too, that lends the piece a stinging edge. The crowning touch: he performs the whole thing with a red rose clenched in his mouth (let’s hope someone trimmed the thorns beforehand).




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