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Thursday, May 16


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#1 dirac

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 10:14 AM

The Eifman Ballet brings "Rodin" to Chicago.

“Suffering is not the ideology behind my own art,” said Eifman. “But I am attracted by those artists with tragic biographies — people who live in a special world, who see what we normal people don’t see. They open new worlds for me. They make my fantasy world richer. And they give me new possibilities for my own creativity.”

And in Rodin — whose masterworks include “The Kiss,” The Thinker,” “The Burghers of Calais” and “The Gates of Hell” (that monumental “door” evoking scenes from Dante’s “The Inferno”) — Eifman found a particularly kindred artistic spirit.



#2 dirac

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 10:16 AM

Attila Mosolygo give his last performance this weekend.

Mosolygo, however, isn’t leaving dance or Grand Rapids Ballet. “It’s a bit strange to say I’m retiring,” he said with a laugh. “When people hear I’m retiring, they think I’m packing up my suitcase and going.”

“I’m retiring on Sunday, but I’ll be back on Monday morning,” he said.



#3 dirac

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 10:21 AM

Two reviews of Northern Ballet in "The Great Gatsby."

Londonist

But this aside (and this is easily overcome by a little synopsis reading), Gatsby is a wonderful ballet. Choreography and costume designs by David Nixon are gorgeous. Party scenes and pas de deux in particular are a spectacular mix of feathered headbands, floaty dresses and vibrant, impassioned dancing. Music by Sir Richard Rodney Bennett is also a delight, with a wonderful variety of sounds and moods created and played to perfection by the Northern Ballet Sinfonia.


Metro

The stumbling block with The Great Gatsby is that it’s more what’s not said in F Scott Fitzgerald’s novel than what is that gives the story its power.

Simply not moving isn’t going to work in a dance show. So Nixon fills the stage with flap-happy Charleston dance scenes and athletic ménages à trois – all stylishly dressed and beautifully lit.



#4 dirac

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 10:28 AM

A review of Australian Ballet by Lloyd Bradford Syke for Crikey.

I only wish I could be as enthusiastic about Wayne McGregor’s Dyad 1929, from (confusingly) 2009. At first glance, it’s striking, for its itsy-bitsy, teeny-weeny, yellow polka-dot bikini stage garb. Aurally, too, Steve Reich’s Double Sextet is an awakening departure; ‘though even this becomes a little irritating, as the dance seems to go nowhere discernible: thematically, narratively, dramatically, or emotionally. Worse, given the lucidity, intelligence, wit, innovations (Kylian takes vocabularies from myriad forms of modern dance, boldly reapplying such in anachronistic classical contexts) and aesthetic transcendence of the first two works, it comes across as dense, directionless and, dare I say, a little ugly.



#5 dirac

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 10:40 AM

The Australian Ballet School gets a financial boost from the government.

An extra $610,000 a year for four years will help relieve underfunding of the Melbourne-based academy, says general manager Sandra Ball.

Tuesday's budget has made good on promises in the national cultural policy, delivering first instalments on multi-year programs worth $235m.



#6 dirac

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 09:23 AM

A story on the Trocks.

"It used to be edgy when we started — super edgy — but it's not that way anymore," said artistic director Tory Dobrin, who used to dance under the name Margot Mundeyn (in tribute to English ballerina Dame Margot Fonteyn) before a promotion to Dame Margot Low-Octeyn.

As he explained it, the project that started in the freewheeling 1970s got caught up in the culture wars of the '80s, and its mostly gay roster thinned out during the AIDS crisis. In the '90s, "we started to regroup and stopped caring so much about our acceptance," Dobrin said. "We just decided to do what we were going to do."



#7 dirac

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 09:27 AM

A review of New York City Ballet by Robert Johnson in The Star-Ledger of Newark.

During Martins’ now 30-year tenure, City Ballet audiences have often deserved better ballets. One old ballet, however, deserves a better audience.

George Balanchine’s grim "Ivesiana," to creaking, groaning music by Charles Ives, repels some people. Reviving it after a long absence, management tried to keep viewers comfortable by pillowing it with the upbeat "Who Cares?" (Gershwin); "Tarantella" (Gottschalk); and "Stars and Stripes" (Sousa). Some still walked out.



#8 dirac

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 09:38 AM

Yuri and Zenaida Yanowsky plan to dance together before they end their careers.

As children, Zenaida Yanowsky and brother Yury traveled around Europe together watching their parents, Anatol Yanowsky and Carmen Robles, perform with the Lyon Opera Ballet. But over the past 20 years the two principal dancers have been based in different countries.



#9 dirac

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Posted 21 May 2013 - 05:25 PM

An interview with Wayne McGregor about his new ballet, "Raven Girl."

The novella’s own metamorphosis has been far from instant—almost three years from Mr. McGregor’s first meeting with Ms. Niffenegger to next month’s opening night. "I knew I wanted a fairy tale," Mr. McGregor says. "[Audrey] reminded me recently that I actually said ‘dark’ fairy tale. We met in Chicago where my company, Random, was performing. We talked about what we might do. There are actually three versions: Audrey’s book, my version for the stage and a film—not a film of the ballet but something in its own right."



#10 dirac

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Posted 27 May 2013 - 11:29 AM

Q&A with Jennie Somogyi.

Time Out New York: How are you now?

Jennie Somogyi: The interesting thing about the Achilles—well, nobody tells you when it first happens. I was really upset that night. Mostly because I had a three-year-old at home, and I was thinking, How in the world am I going to take care of a three-year-old without being able to walk?..... But they kept saying to me that night, “This is going to be a piece of cake compared to what happened to you last time. This is going to be nothing.” And now that I talk to others—athletes or people that I know who have had this happen—it’s actually pretty amazing how far and how quickly I’ve come, because it seems that people never really regain their muscle tone in that leg. They always have one skinny leg. I have a little bit of that atrophy still, but not like some people that I’ve seen that are five, six years out of surgery. So I’m really happy with what I’ve accomplished in a short period of time. It’ll keep getting better. Obviously, I’m still, in a sense, compromised. It was a major injury.




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