Jump to content


This site uses cookies. By using this site, you agree to accept cookies, unless you've opted out. (US government web page with instructions to opt out: http://www.usa.gov/optout-instructions.shtml)

Monday, May 6


  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,474 posts

Posted 06 May 2013 - 10:33 AM

An obituary for Frederic Franklin in The Times.

Franklin made his professional debut as a chorus boy in 1931, when he appeared in a Casino de Paris revue that starred Josephine Baker. His final performances were in the small but crucial mime role of Friar Laurence in Kenneth MacMillan’s Romeo and Juliet. That was with American Ballet Theatre at the Metropolitan Opera House in New York during July 2010.


Appreciation by Carrie Seidman in The Sarasota Herald-Tribune.

No, I'm not old enough to have seen Franklin, who danced in everything from "Swan Lake" to "Rodeo" and had a career on the stage as well, perform live. But anyone who saw the 2005 documentary "Ballet Russes," which featured interviews with and footage of the dancers of the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo (Franklin among them) couldn't help but be seduced by his youthful energy, wonderful sense of humor and admirable talents.



#2 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,474 posts

Posted 06 May 2013 - 10:38 AM

Backstage at NYCB costume fittings with Joseph Altuzarra.

“He had done six or seven different sketches for the girl,” said Marc Happel, the company’s costume director. “He immediately put them down in front of me and asked what I thought was the best. He trusted me.”

Mr. Happel said it was satisfying to work with a designer who is “always willing to listen.” He recalled a time when the early sketches of Mr. Fairchild’s costume featured a low neckline that exposed the chest. “In the U.S., more so than Europe, men’s nipples are something we don’t expose, so I advised him to raise the neckline,” he said.



#3 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,474 posts

Posted 06 May 2013 - 10:40 AM

A review of the cinema broadcast of the Royal Ballet in "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" also by Carrie Seidman.

The first act is a little long (at 70 minutes), but Lamb is so accurately adolescent and incorrigible and the "special effects" so dazzling — in particular, Alice's tumble down the rabbit hole in which a marionette is shown on film spirally down a tunnel as cinematic hearts, numbers and leaves fly by — there's not a moment that's less than captivating.



#4 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,474 posts

Posted 06 May 2013 - 10:51 AM

The National Ballet of Canada will present the first-ever "Giselle" at the Saratoga Performing Arts Center.

In recognition of the inaugural presentation of “Giselle” at SPAC, the venue will co-present a series of special events June 23 through 26 to give the public a deeper look at the history, story and choreography of this iconic ballet.

• Sunday, June 23: Film screening, “A Portrait of Giselle.” The Academy Award-nominated documentary film will be presented by SPAC and the Saratoga Film Forum followed by a reception and an informal discussion moderated by local dance critic Jay Rogoff.An important historical document, the film offers an inside look at what is widely considered one of the most important female roles in ballet history.



#5 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,474 posts

Posted 06 May 2013 - 11:05 AM

A preview of "Nikolai and the Others" by Adam Hetrick in Playbill. Photo gallery.

"My hope is to show a world where the creating of art – in this case of a dance – lives side by side, cheek by jowl, with all other essential and necessary functions of human life; such as eating, drinking, dying, sleeping, dreaming, making love, laughing, remembering, disappointing, and attempting to be generous," Nelson said in production notes for Nikolai and the Others.



#6 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,474 posts

Posted 06 May 2013 - 11:16 AM

A currently un-bylined review of the Royal Ballet in 'Mayerling' in The Times.

Among the various Rudolfs on show this season I want to single out Rupert Pennefather, a dancer who has made this role his own. Instead of having his Rudolf chomp at the bit of madness and mayhem from the start, he slowly unravels the loneliness and pain that drive the Prince to abase himself as he seeks respite from his demons. Here is a haunted antihero handsome enough to attract every woman in his wake yet vulnerable enough to be sympathetic, even when confronting his wife on her wedding night with a gun in one hand and a skull in the other. Creepy, yes, but utterly irresistible in Pennefather’s multifaceted and unusually romantic performance.



#7 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,474 posts

Posted 07 May 2013 - 11:22 AM

A National Public Radio obituary for Frederic Franklin, with audio.

But he became a star with the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo and his famed partnership with Russian prima ballerina Alexandra Danilova, who upon meeting him warned him “Young man, if you are going to dance with me, you must learn where my curves are.” As the New York Times in its obituary today put it, he did learn, and they danced together for many years. His charm, grace and good humor were on display at Jacob’s Pillow in 2006 when Here & Now‘s Lynn Menegon sat down with him.



#8 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,474 posts

Posted 07 May 2013 - 11:29 AM

Reviews of San Francisco Ballet's "Cinderella."

SF Weekly

Played in drag in Frederick Ashton's 1948 version of the ballet, Wheeldon's stepsisters -- the haughty Edwina, danced with smirking success by Sarah Van Patten, and spunky, bespectacled Clementine, danced by the endearingly hilarious Frances Chung -- take center stage from their first entrance, whether bickering or sashaying through comically competitive routines. They might be villains, but Cinderella isn't so sweet herself, flinging her new sisters' proffered bouquet disdainfully at stepmother Hortensia's feet.


The Examiner

Maria Kochetkova is captivating as Cinderella. The role allows her to project extreme emotions ranging from deep anguish to heightened senses of joy and fulfillment. Her first scene is reminiscent of Aurora's entrance in Sleeping Beauty—we need to see the effervescence of a budding debutante. Cinderella is radiant and respectful as she lovingly approaches her mother's grave carrying a bouquet of flowers....... A pall comes over the moment as her father enters arm-in-arm with Hortensia and her daughters. Cinderella realizes she is to be at the bottom of this new totem. With a simple downcast glance, Maria Kochetkova can convey profound defeat.


The San Francisco Appeal

And that may be the greatest gift that Wheeldon can give to story ballets. His genius with abstract, story-less ballets in the past has been his ability to find connections and create new ways to see dance. And so surprisingly, this same gift transcends “Cinderella” as he brings to light the flow and earnestness of these relationships through a beautiful ballet that moves you to pieces. Better yet, the choreography itself is interesting, infusing infectious gestures with sweeping legs and curtsy-like steps.


danceviewtimes

Gratefully, Wheeldon took the saccharine out of "Cinderella" but with it went some of the sweetness. Except for the last Pas de Deux, an intensely private moment between two young people deeply in love, the choreography was at its most inventive during its high comedy sections. Some of those were simply brilliant. Trying on the slipper became a race along the lines of Musical Chairs, the sped-up national dances tumbled over each other, and instead of a white dove dropping the dress -- Wheeldon opted for Grimm -- a whole menagerie of fantastical beasts got involved.



#9 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,474 posts

Posted 08 May 2013 - 11:34 AM

A 2010 interview with Frederic Franklin from PRI's "The World."

Correspondent Alex Gallafent profiled Franklin in 2010 when Franklin was 95 years old: he was still performing on stage. Here’s that original piece.



#10 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,474 posts

Posted 08 May 2013 - 05:29 PM

Reviews of "Nikolai and the Others."

Variety

In Richard Nelson’s new play, “Nikolai and the Others,” George Balanchine, Igor Stravinsky, Maria Tallchief and a full complement of other notable Russian emigres spend a Chekhovian weekend together in 1948 at a country house in Westport, Conn. Food is consumed, art is discussed, and secrets are bared — quite stylishly, in fact, under David Croner’s helming. But the essential take on this is that famous people can be just as dull as regular folks on a lazy weekend in the country.


The New York Times

Oops, I almost forgot Nikolai, who is played by Stephen Kunken. Everybody forgets Nikolai, except when somebody needs him, a process of neglect and exploitation that gives the play its somewhat shaky center. Nika, as his friends call him, is Nikolai Nabokov, a once-celebrated composer (and the former husband of Natasha) who now works for Voice of America and has become to the go-to man for Russian artists having problems with American mores and laws.



#11 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,474 posts

Posted 10 May 2013 - 11:45 AM

Q&A with Irina Dvorovenko.

Time Out New York: What was the audition like?
Irina Dvorovenko: We’re at the audition, and I see that Ashley Bouder is exiting. And then Maria Kowroski. [Anguished] Everybody was auditioning. I entered the room, and it was a double table and five people sitting there already; there is a lady with a script, and they introduce me to everybody—I’m shaking like a leaf inside, but staying very calm on the outside. We’re talking, and from nothing basically—it’s like as I am talking to you—it starts. I’m sitting because it starts on the bed and [In character], “No, no, no, no I cannot believe it!” I need to put big drama right away. I’m holding the script, but I already memorized it. I did one scene. I’m keeping myself in character, but inside I am shaking like crazy. My legs! But I was just behaving in the part. I see all of them laughing. They are basically peeing in their pants.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


Help support Ballet Alert! and Ballet Talk for Dancers year round by using this search box for your amazon.com purchases (adblockers may block display):