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Thursday, May 2


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11 replies to this topic

#1 dirac

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 01:13 PM

An interview with Mike Piazza on his debut with Miami City Ballet. Text and audio.

Working with Piazza on staging and coaching for his cameo is Philip Neal.

“We want to make ballet fans out of sports fans,” he said. “And I think the athleticism that’s there is a natural fit.”



#2 dirac

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 01:15 PM

A memorial ceremony for Maria Tallchief open to the public will be held on Sunday.

Among those speaking at the memorial Sunday include Elise Paschen, her daughter and award-winning poet; Jacques d'Amboise, legendary dancer, choreographer and longtime colleague; William Mason, director emeritus of Lyric Opera of Chicago; Kenneth von Heidecke, founder of the Von Heidecke Chicago Festival Ballet; Peter Bensinger Sr., a family friend, and Bill Kurtis, television journalist. George Lepauw, founder of the International Beethoven Project, will offer a music tribute. The program will conclude with a celebratory film tribute by Donna LaPietra.



#3 dirac

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 01:17 PM

The Joyce Theater announces its 2013-14 season schedule.

.....several making their Joyce debuts - and loaded with highly anticipated premieres, including The Royal Ballet's production of Kafka's The Metamorphosis, choreographed by Arthur Pita especially for Royal Ballet Principal Edward Watson.



#4 dirac

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 01:19 PM

A review of New York City Ballet's spring gala by Mary Cargill for danceviewtimes.

Ashley Bouder, with Andrew Veyette, stayed just this side of coy as Liberty Bell, though she veered dangerously close to caricature. Her dancing was a marvel of classical purity, powerful and clean, but she doesn't need to insist that the audience get the joke; her masterful performance was enough. Veyette's springy jumps were unbelievably juicy, but he tried a bit too hard to make his melange of turns look Soviet. But the audience loved the ballet, and so did I.



#5 dirac

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Posted 03 May 2013 - 05:26 AM

More previews of the Mariinsky's new theater.

The Globe and Mail

The opening of the Mariinsky Theatre II, a $700-million venue designed by Toronto architects that is easily among the largest ballet and opera houses in the world, was celebrated with showcase spectacle on Thursday, including a performance by tenor Placido Domingo. Two more days of opening programs are scheduled before some of the first official performances begin later this month.


Euronews (with video)

Members of staff and war veterans were among those in the first audience on May 1, for a preview performance ahead of the theatre’s official opening.


The Guardian

To some it is a modern monstrosity, to others it is rather too bland. Yet to nearly all in Russia's second city, the new theatre, known as the Mariinsky II, comes imbued with the hope that Saint Petersburg – and Russia – can reclaim a role as a global cultural capital.



#6 dirac

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Posted 03 May 2013 - 05:32 AM

Patrons of the Houston Ballet have a party. Photo gallery.

Among those grazing through the buffet dinner spread by from Elegant Events and Catering by Michael were dancers Linnar Looris, Connor Walsh and Jessica Collado.



#7 dirac

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Posted 03 May 2013 - 05:34 AM

Christopher Wheeldon's "Cinderella" has its San Francisco premiere this weekend.

"This Cinderella is different from other ballet versions of the story," explained Wheeldon to The Huffington Post. "We've combined elements of the Grimm and Perrault versions of the tale and added some of our own. The production is comical, romantic and theatrical. We want to take audiences on a magical journey."



#8 dirac

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Posted 04 May 2013 - 04:58 PM

A review of San Francisco Ballet by Toba Singer in the California Literary Review.

Symphony in Three Movements coincided with a special evening for San Francisco Ballet’s principal dancer Pierre François Vilanoba: his sudden retirement from the company. Villanoba, who is French, is a 15-year company veteran, and while his retirement was expected, that plan was fast-tracked by an injury during a performance a week earlier, and news of this, his last performance, spread mostly by word of mouth. Nonetheless, a shank of retired SFB dancers, as well as stalwart company members not scheduled to dance in this matinee, mobilized to offer support and participate in the moving if silent farewell at the close of the program.



#9 dirac

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Posted 06 May 2013 - 11:03 AM

Two previews of Richard Nelson's new play, "Nikolai and the Others."

The New York Times

The play unfolds during an imaginary weekend in the spring of 1948, when Balanchine, Stravinsky and other high-profile Russian artists living in the United States were becoming implicated in cold war cultural politics. They long for the old world while plunging into the new. The parallels with the Greek myth — in which Orpheus must avoid looking back at his beloved to keep her alive — are clear.


The Hour

Nelson, a prolific, award-winning playwright, talked by phone about his project. "I chose Westport because, in 1948, it had a certain cachet as a place that attracted artists. What interested me was this Russian émigré community isolated from society. Putting them in the woods in Connecticut was a way of making them safe, where they could speak Russian, where they could remember their pasts without intrusion."

Actually, work on "Orpheus" took place mainly in New York. The result of an enduring collaboration between Balanchine and Stravinsky, two of the 20th century's greatest artistic figures.........



#10 dirac

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Posted 06 May 2013 - 11:21 AM

A review of the Australian Ballet by Deborah Jones in The Australian.

The first performance of The Four Temperaments in this season happened to fall on the 30th anniversary of Balanchine's death and confirms his genius. The 4Ts (1946) is astringent, precise, sophisticated, cerebral and incredibly exposing. It was thrilling to see it again, even if the ballet's magisterial command and patrician wit and elegance were insufficiently projected. The exceptions on Tuesday were Lana Jones's force-of-nature Choleric and Leanne Stojmenov's Sanguinic, springy and elastic when needed but with a lovely plush quality in the circle of low lifts, abetted by newly minted principal artist Ty King-Wall.



#11 dirac

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Posted 08 May 2013 - 05:18 PM

A list of ten classic books that were turned into ballets.

William Styron’s 600-page novel has appeared in many forms, including a four-hour opera, but the most puzzling adaptation is Cathy Marston’s 40-minute ballet Sophie, which ran at the Royal Opera House in London in 2003. The truncation of the name is apt, since Marston removed Sophie’s famous choice from her presentation of Sophie’s Choice.....



#12 dirac

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Posted 10 May 2013 - 01:31 PM

Merrill Brockway has died at age 90. Obituary by Craig Smith in The Santa Fe New Mexican.

In fact, Dance in America came along at a pivotal moment in American arts funding — and in Brockway’s life. As he recalled in another New Mexican interview, “It was 1975, the height of the dance boom,” and money poured in from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, and Exxon. Brockway dryly noted in his 2010 memoir Surprise Was My Teacher (Sunstone Press), “NEA wanted quality; CPB wanted quantity; Exxon wanted tutus.”




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