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Monday, April 22


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#1 dirac

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 09:36 AM

Ballet Black will perform at Cambridge.

Every year the company commissions choreographers to create new pieces for them to perform, and is currently touring with four new ballets. “The show is two halves,” Cassa explains. “The first half is three abstract ballets, well, not necessarily abstract but three shorter ballets to all kinds of music. One is a specially composed score by Cambridge local Fabio D’andrea, and another is set to some Hilary Hahn sort of electronic experimental music and some Hawaiian barbershop quartet.”



#2 dirac

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 09:37 AM

The Birmingham Royal Ballet presents 'Coppelia' at the Virginia Arts Festival.

BRB artistic director David Bintley added: “To be the only company to be regularly asked back to the Virginia Arts Festival makes us feel special.

“It’s very important for us to perform abroad, as we want to take the name of Birmingham around the world. We’re an international company, of an international standard, so it’s good for our city to see us playing in New York, Tokyo or Virginia.”



#3 dirac

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 10:17 AM

Reviews of the Royal Ballet in 'Mayerling.'

Financial Times

This, you may say with some feeling for déjà vu phenomena, is to be another ecstatic review for Mayerling (back in the Opera House repertory last Friday night) and for Edward Watson. Of course! How not to salute MacMillan’s masterpiece of still-astounding danced and dramatic sensibilities? How not to praise a dancer who understands every least twitch of Archduke Rudolf’s psyche, and shows us – with a physical and emotional finesse, an inevitability that pierces the heart – a man descending into mania and darkest tragedy? Here is artistry tremendous in expressive force, in intensity and intelligence. Here is a great dancer.


The Independent

Mara Galeazzi, who retires at the end of this season, is a lighter Mary. Her fluttering feet and show the character’s pliability, rather than her own obsessive drive. Sarah Lamb’s Larisch has a delight in power, without losing tenderness for Rudolf. Zenaida Yanowsky is superb as Rudolf’s mother, with flowing, regal lines and conflicting emotions. Laura Morera’s Mitzi Caspar is a tart too sensible to waste time on hearts of gold. As Rudolf’s unhappy wife, Emma Maguire is fearless, despite a slip in the big pas de deux.



#4 dirac

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Posted 23 April 2013 - 09:47 AM

Q&A with Sara Mearns.

Time Out New York: What do you want in a partner?
Sara Mearns: Well, anything that Jared Angle or Jon Stafford has—and sometimes Amar [Ramasar]. I don’t want to make them work so hard and make them do everything. That makes me feel like I’m not strong. I want somebody who is there, but not there. Jared—you know he’s going to catch it, but he’s going to catch it at the last minute, and that’s what I love, because I can be so crazy and so extreme. I’m kind of like Kyra Nichols: I don’t want much, but what I do want is very specific at that moment. She didn’t like the guy touching her a lot. She wanted him to stand away and then be there at the last moment. I learned that from partnering with Chuck Askegard; he was one of my first partners......



#5 dirac

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Posted 23 April 2013 - 09:49 AM

A review of the National Ballet of Canada in "Romeo and Juliet" by Alastair Macaulay in The New York Times.

It’s a sign of Mr. Ratmansky’s eminence and skill that the only versions to which this one need be compared are those by four dead choreographers: Leonid Lavrovsky (1940), Frederick Ashton (1955), John Cranko (1962) and MacMillan (1965). This one has virtues several of those lack, but misses the sheer stylistic authority that any of those have exhibited at their best.

This “Romeo” is a guest choreographer’s production. Though it must have been prepared carefully and at length, and though the Canadian dancers acquit themselves well, you don’t sense the intensity of delivery that comes with a close collaboration between dancers and choreographer over a long period.



#6 dirac

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Posted 23 April 2013 - 09:53 AM

A brief "Ballet 101" Q&A.

What if I want to dance for recreation?
Then, the answer is simple: It's never too late. The benefits of ballet (i.e. strength, flexibility, self-esteem) are not limited by age. In fact, the number of beginning adult classes alone have greatly multiplied over the past five years. The perception of a beginner dance student has evolved making room for dancers of all ages, shapes and sizes who simply have a passion or desire to dance. So, the advice is to just go for it and discover that you are not the only one in the class with no idea how to tell a pas de bouree from a port au bras, flexibility that could use some help, and a love for all things ballet.



#7 dirac

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Posted 25 April 2013 - 11:06 AM

A story on the benefits of ballet class for adults by Charmaine Yabsley in The Sydney Morning Herald.

Academic Resources Coalition found that a weekly dance program could improve physical performance and increase energy levels among adults.

A study by the English National Ballet and University of Roehampton found that dance benefited people with Parkinson's disease by relieving debilitating symptoms, aiding short-term mobility and significantly improving stability, as well as contributing to social inclusion and artistic expression.



#8 dirac

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 05:25 PM

Fabrice Calmels shares his "Othello" workout regimen.


No work out would be complete without sit-ups. Core strength is so important to a dancers, you know my costume doesn't leave much up to the imagination. And for that, I do 4 sets of 50 situps every day.

The last aspect of my workout includes using the Pilates Reformer to counterbalance all the pushing my muscles do while dancing and in the above workout. I find that using this machine to do pulling exercises gives me a good antagonist workout to balance the pushing/pressing I do throughout my day.




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