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Monday, April 8


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#1 dirac

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Posted 08 April 2013 - 11:07 AM

Reviews of the Mikhailovsky Ballet.

The Guardian

During the two years in which Nacho Duato has been artistic director of the Mikhailovsky, he's brought seven of his own works into its repertory. And there's no question that this sustained exposure to new choreography has added a transforming dimension to the Mikhailovsky style. Watching them in Multiplicity. Forms of Emptiness and Silence, they're almost unrecognisable from the company performing Giselle or Don Quixote. These aren't ballet dancers who've been shoehorned into an alien, contemporary aesthetic – they inhabit Duato's earthy, maverick choreography as if it had been bred as deeply in their bones as Petipa.


The Evening Standard

Spanish contemporary choreographer Duato joined the Mikhailovsky in 2011 and leaves next year but in his short tenure has produced a lot of new work. It’s very much in the school of Jirí Kylián: less classical than effortlessly classy, with ballet’s beauty minus the prissiness and pointe shoes, tasteful music, flattering lighting, long legs showing off their splits and the odd choreographic quirk. So maybe it looks a little familiar — but it also looks bloody gorgeous.


The Times

Multiplicity. Forms of Silence and Emptiness is Duato’s ambitious take on the art of Bach. The music — mainly concertos and orchestral suites in Act I, organ music and fragments of The Art of the Fugue in Act II — sounded splendid as played by the company orchestra. My problem, as with all of Duato’s dances, is I don’t necessarily want his imagery in my head as I listen to such glorious sounds.



#2 dirac

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Posted 08 April 2013 - 11:09 AM

A review of the Mikhailovsky by Katie Colombus for The Stage.

Without Words is a simple and stunning show of form and structure set to the music of Schubert. In nude costume, we look at these fine athletes with an anatomical eye, with all other production values vanquished, concentrating on the delicate choreography and lilting movements of the dancers. Although emotionally impassive, the sweep and glide of their movement is effective. Arms outstretched, easy lifts, increasing arabesques and circular motions in spins and traced pathways all pertain to images of flight.



#3 dirac

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Posted 08 April 2013 - 11:13 AM

Natalia Osipova jumps to the Royal Ballet.

The Independent

Her first performance will be the female lead in Kenneth MacMillan’s Romeo and Juliet opposite Carlos Acosta.


The Arts Desk

Kommersant's respected dance critic Tatiana Kuznetsova writes today that under Osipova's ABT contract she has spring commitments scheduled in New York. Her agent told Kuznetsova, "I did managed to discuss the new situation with Kevin McKenzie, and he did not hide his frustration, as the spring season in London coincides with New York, but this is a new reality that will have to be dealt with somehow. It is difficult to say how it will be settled, but the fact remains that there are conflicting interests, and we will hope for the wisdom of the leaders of the two companies to settle it."



#4 dirac

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Posted 08 April 2013 - 11:14 AM

A review of the English National Ballet and the Mikhailovsky Ballet by Louise Levene in The Telegraph.

George Williamson’s stripped-down scenario was strongly danced and played by an attractive cast but the production is blighted by an aproned actress who busybodies about the stage stating the bleeding obvious.



Once upon a time ENB’s family matinees were introduced by Angelina Ballerina, a giant mouse in a tutu, but Williamson has no faith in dance’s ability to tell a story unaided and the result is an insult to any child’s intelligence.



#5 dirac

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Posted 08 April 2013 - 11:17 AM

A gallery of photographs following young Jessica Khvedelidze.

Mr. Nazaryan first met her when he volunteered to photograph at the Brighton Ballet Theater School of Russian-American Ballet in Brooklyn. But the story really started a few weeks earlier when he attended the Eddie Adams workshop last fall.



#6 dirac

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Posted 08 April 2013 - 11:34 AM

Houston Ballet dancers participate in a culinary fundraiser.

Hearty courses followed, including quail yakitori by Haven chef/owner Randy Evans and Japanese demi soloist Charles-Louis Yoshiyama, as well as a non-soupy spin on ramen starring slow-roasted pork belly and crispy noodles by Underbelly’s Chris Shepherd and Houston Ballet soloist Nau Kusuzaki. The evening capped with dessert from Fluff Bake Bar’s Rebecca Masson and British dancer Chris Coomer; the pair created a deconstructed riff on Cadbury’s famous Lion Bar.



#7 dirac

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Posted 08 April 2013 - 11:36 AM

An obituary for Patricia B. Sigurdson, co-founder of Salt Creek Ballet.

Mrs. Sigurdson became passionate about ballet as a girl. After graduating from high school in Denver, she was accepted by the Royal Ballet School in London. After nine months there, she returned to the U.S., studying with Robert Joffrey and Frederic Franklin in New York.

Mrs. Sigurdson eventually joined a forerunner of the American Ballet Theatre and was part of that company's historic, six-week tour behind the Iron Curtain, in Russia and Eastern Europe.



#8 dirac

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Posted 08 April 2013 - 11:42 AM

Reviews of the Royal Ballet in "La Bayadere."

The Financial Times

So far, so admirable, though I still deplore the orchestral flummery imposed on dear old Minkus by John Lanchbery’s florid orchestration. But, as too often with our national ballet, the first night resembled a dress rehearsal. Ensembles looked frayed at the edges, flurried; characterisations went either too far or not far enough (Gary Avis’s High Brahmin is almost too high), and casting had fallen victim to injury. Marianela Núñez appeared – as scheduled – as an admirably understood, splendidly danced Gamzatti, a combination of classic bravura and devious motives, while Roberta Marquez replaced Alina Cojocaru as Nikiya in the arms of Federico Bonnelli’s Solor.


Londonist

Federico Bonelli dances Solor with youthful vigour and impetuosity — now swearing eternal love to Nikiya in a gorgeous, buoyant pas de deux, now captivated by the frosty beauty of his new fiancée. Marianela Núñez dances the complex Gamzatti with fearsome command — at first winsome, almost girlishly thrilled at thought of marriage to the manly Solor; then chilling in her certitude that Nikiya must die. The night belongs to Núñez, who glitters in the role with alternating rosy brightness and flashes of real menace.


The Telegraph

Nor did sparks fly between him and Roberta Marquez, standing in as Nikiya. Admittedly, Marquez has grown considerably as an artist of late: besides letting her show off the luxuriant arch of her back, Act 1 saw her project herself with graveness and nobility, while her physical delicacy lent an ideal vulnerability to the role. In the Kingdom of the Shades, however, that projection rather deserted her and she seemed lost in an overwhelmingly big space.



#9 dirac

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Posted 09 April 2013 - 01:37 PM

Cuban defector Eduardo Gonzalez signs with Sarasota Ballet.

Asked which choreographer's work he would particularly like to dance now that he is in America, Gonzalez seemed stumped.

"He actually doesn't know too many," said Dubrocq.




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