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Tuesday, April 2

10 posts in this topic

The Friends of Sarasota Ballet hold a fundraiser for the company.

The black tie optional event includes cocktails, a gourmet dinner and a performance by students from the Sarasota Ballet School and the Margaret Barbieri Conservatory of Dance. There will also be music for dancing and entertainment....

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A story on fitness classes featuring barre work by Chris Zdeb in The Edmonton Journal.

Megan Clark, instructor and owner of the Barre Body Studio, the first barre studio in Edmonton that opened in January, explains the technique.

“We’ll isolate one specific part of the hamstrings and work that to exhaustion, and then stretch it to lengthen it, and then we’ll work another part of the hamstrings and take that to exhaustion. We’re developing those secondary, accessory muscles that give you that longer, leaner look,” Clark says

.

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A review of San Francisco Ballet in 'Onegin' by Toba Singer for the California Literary Review.

San Francisco Ballet’s choice to present John Cranko’s Onegin for the past two seasons was an inspired one. One wonders what Cranko, who was much admired by his dance colleagues for his precocious insight and sensitivity to the vicissitudes of the human personality, might have had to say about this year’s production, and its consequences for those cast to dance it. Due to injuries and a spate of heroics in casting changes and fractious reactions within the company to them, roles were shuffled, with one of the results being that Cory Stearns, a dancer from American Ballet Theatre was brought in two days before opening night to dance the title role, and partner Yuan Yuan Tan, the second-cast Tatiana. In the opening night cast, Joan Boada was put in for an injured Gennadi Nedvigin as Lensky. Given the rash of uncertainties, harsh decisions and tensions, the surviving cast, under the stouthearted tutelage of choreologist Jane Bourne, soldiered through with a show that had its ups and downs, but mostly ups.

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San Francisco Ballet announces the lineup for its 2014 season.

Perhaps most exciting is a world premiere by British choreographer Liam Scarlett in Program 7. Not yet 30, Scarlett has won numerous awards and is artist in residence for the Royal Ballet in London. A flexible artist, his style ranges from psychologically dramatic, Kenneth MacMillan-like narratives to post-Balanchine classicism.

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Royal Ballet photo gallery.

Dancers, by Andrej Upenski, who is a Royal Ballet dancer himself, follows the process from first rehearsal to final performance.

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Mike Piazza will make a cameo appearance in Miami City Ballet's production of "Slaughter on Tenth Avenue."

So how'd he score this gig? Piazza's six-year-old daughter Nicoletta is a student at the Miami City Ballet School and conspired with the ballet's artistic director Lourdes Lopez to get him involved.

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Q&A with Dana Benton of Colorado Ballet.

How long have you been doing Fancy Footwork? What’s the backstory behind it?

This is Fancy Footwork’s 3rd year. Formerly, as part of our regular season a “Patron Show” was performed by the dancers. When the recession hit, Colorado Ballet had to make some tough decisions, and putting the “Patron Show” on the backburner was one of them. After a couple of years the dancers still wanted to do something for our patrons and for the company as a thank you for the support throughout the years. We decided to bring back the “Patron Show” and evolve into something new with a different flare; that is how Fancy Footwork was born.

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Aimee Tsao reviews San Francisco Ballet in "Onegin" for DanceTabs. Many thanks to phrank for the heads up!

John Cranko’s Onegin has become the Swan Lake of the past quarter century. The 48-year-old ballet has now been performed by most of the major ballet companies in the world as well as by some lesser-known ones. Based on Alexander Pushkin’s verse nove, Eugene Onegin, the dramatic narrative provides some of the most emotionally complex characters in the ballet repertoire. They challenge the dancers to draw on all their artistic powers in bringing them to life. All five principal roles – Onegin, Lensky, Tatiana, Olga and Gremin – ideally need to be worked on collaboratively to ensure that each one’s interpretation fits in with all the others’ portrayals. On the other hand the music is a patchwork-quilt compilation of Tchaikovsky piano pieces (including parts of The Seasons) and portions of larger orchestral works – Francesca da Rimini, Romeo and Juliet and Symphonic Fantasy. Despite the fine orchestration by Kurt-Heinz Stolze and exceptional conducting by Charles Barker, the score still lacks the grand melodic and emotional sweep of his ballets – Swan Lake, Sleeping Beauty and Nutcracker.

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Patricia and Jeanette Delgado are profiled by Lizette Alvarez in The New York Times.

“I closed my eyes and opened them, and overnight said: ‘Oh, my God. My sister is amazing,’ ” Patricia said. “I knew she would have opportunities I wouldn’t get, and that was the first time I was dealing with that.”

The turnaround forced the sisters to recalibrate their relationship; Jeanette felt awkward about her swift rise from the corps de ballet and the gushing reviews. And Patricia had to adjust to the sudden shift of the limelight. Their mother simply reminded them of the rule: Talk it out.

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Audrey Niffenegger talks about writing the libretto of a new piece for the Royal Ballet.

Ballet turned up in Niffenegger's life when David Drew, once Principal dancer at the Royal Ballet, was given a copy of her illustrated book, The Three Incestuous Sisters. Light on words but heavy on imagery and melancholy gothic drama, Drew thought the book was a ballet waiting to take the stage. He rapidly realised Niffenegger knew nothing about dance itself so took her around workshops, rehearsals and to shows whenever she was in London. By seeing how the shows come together in this world of rosin and gruelling rehearsals, Niffenegger found an identifiable hook in what is a fairly alien world to a writer and illustrator:

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