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Diaghilev Exhibition in DC (May 12-Sep 2, 2013)reports on exhib, special programs


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#16 sandik

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Posted 03 June 2013 - 10:01 AM

"Dionysian excesses cede place to Apollonian restraint" is beautifully put, but did Scholl really liken Apollo's strumming to, er, auto-stimulation? That doesn't make sense to me at all, especially in the context of the music.


This idea is making me smile, in part because Stanko Milov's performance of the solo at Pacific Northwest Ballet a few years ago reminded me very powerfully of Elvis, and all that implies!

#17 Helene

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Posted 03 June 2013 - 10:30 AM

Maybe it's the really fast arm circles that inspired the association.

#18 kfw

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Posted 03 June 2013 - 11:45 AM

Maybe it's the really fast arm circles that inspired the association.


That's what I assume. However, I thought he took those from Pete Townsend. Posted Image

#19 sandik

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Posted 03 June 2013 - 11:50 AM


Maybe it's the really fast arm circles that inspired the association.


That's what I assume. However, I thought he took those from Pete Townsend. Posted Image


Other way round, I think, since Townsend was born in 1945! But I do love the idea that they're related! Adds a whole new level to Pinball Wizard.

#20 cinnamonswirl

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Posted 04 June 2013 - 06:43 AM

[font=arial, helvetica, sans-serif][size=5]A final round-table discussion with all panelists and the exhibition's curators seemed to focus on differences among the installations of this exhibit in London vs the US. They are not the same due to size and configuration of exhibition space, interests of the respective museums and interests of the different publics....maybe the reason why items from the famous 1921 Bakst-designed Sleeping Beauty/Sleeping Princess did not travel to America? On the other hand, some items belonging to North American museums are being seen only here - such as the NGA's Portrait of Bakst by Modigliani. Also, the leading curator, Jane Prichard, mentioned that the US version is more focused on audio-visuals, something that the US museum requested. (My own thought: So the exhibit has been 'dumbed down' for America? Sad, if so.)[/size][/font]


Having seen both installations, I prefer the National Gallery's. I think for most people costumes have more interest when you can see them in context, rather that static and hanging on a mannequin. The V&A exhibit was a bit dead, IMO. I'm glad the NGA requested more videos; to me it is an improvement and not a dumbing-down.

#21 kfw

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Posted 04 June 2013 - 08:37 AM



Maybe it's the really fast arm circles that inspired the association.


That's what I assume. However, I thought he took those from Pete Townsend. Posted Image


Other way round, I think, since Townsend was born in 1945! But I do love the idea that they're related! Adds a whole new level to Pinball Wizard.


Yes, it does! I was joking of course, but I wonder if by any chance Townsend had seen Apollo. That seems unlikely, and I can't find a history of performances in England. But he was, after all, an art student.

#22 fadedhour

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Posted 27 June 2013 - 02:35 PM

I went to this and loved it so much I snuck back a few days later to revisit some of the things.  The first time, I went with my parents and my sister (who have no interest in ballet, but were humoring me) and my grandmother (who is interested and loved it).  There was a great moment a few minutes in: my father stood watching the clip of Petrushka for a few minutes and went, "Wow!  I didn't realize ballet could be like this!" smile.png

 

For me, the best parts were the Nijinsky-related items.  After reading so much about him and seeing the various ballets &c., it was surreal to have the costumes just there existing in front of me.  Obviously ones like Spectre de la Rose I was familiar with, but seeing things like his costume for Le Dieu bleu was very strange - I've seen the pictures of that one in black and white loads of times and never imagined the costume to have the colors it did, or the intricate details.  And I loved seeing the beautiful costume from Giselle.

 

I also was really pleased to find costumes from Rite of Spring and L'après-midi d'un faune.  For the latter, they had three of the nymphs' dresses, and they were so delicate and beautiful.  I love this ballet so seeing those was special.  I was amazed to find the Rite of Spring costumes in very good shape, bright and colorful - but then they did only perform the ballet a few times.  I feel like I've read so many accounts of the premiere that it seems more like a legend than something that happened, so again, the physical presence of these things was a strange feeling.

 

I love Valentine Gross's drawings and the Petrushka ones they had here were great.  I also loved this costume from The Ball, and of course the one from Les Sylphides.  And the various tickets/programs they had, too.

 

My only problem with it was that it referred to Romola as as "aspiring ballerina," as I've read elsewhere too many times lately.  

 

All in all, absolutely wonderful, and I'm sure I'd return again if I had the chance.  Please do go if you're at all interested in the subject.



#23 kfw

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Posted 27 June 2013 - 03:53 PM

Thanks for posting, fadedhour. I'm going Sunday, and I expect to return at least once. Has anyone here eaten at the Garden Cafe Ballets Russes?



#24 Ballet Foot

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 12:44 PM

I have only gone to Exhibit four times! I did an overview twice, & have been focusing on different aspects on subsequent visits...the latest being in conjunction with the lecture on specifics of the BRusse costumes  The focus was on the fabrics & the influences of Diaghilev's stage costumes on Parisian high couture of the era, & visa versa. It is amazing what the eye sees when once made aware; patterns etc. I never thought to look at back of costumes. There was no skimping during that era ; even the insides of the costumes were interestingly made. Also, curator pointed out blue makeup around collar of one of Nijinsky's costumes (on exhibit), which was a result of his putting blue make-up all over his body for "Dieu Bleu". The detail on this costume is exquisite.  There are some avant garde costumes as well by Coco Chanel & others.  Picasso even signed one of the backdrops, being especially impressed.  One of the corps costumes was flammable....rather hazardous for dancers, since they were using pyrotechnics. Many were made of flannel. Much of the collection is from Sotheby's auction in 1980's of Serge Lifar's artifacts. I imagine there are many more items still out there in vintage dancers estates. 

 

 

 



#25 California

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Posted 01 August 2013 - 06:56 AM

I just got an e-mail that the Diaghilev exhibit has been extended through October 6:

 

http://www.nga.gov/c...mpaign=25960250

 

I don't know if this is new, but the film has been posted on-line, so that's some small consolation for those of us unable to see the exhibit:

http://www.nga.gov/c...mpaign=25960252



#26 kfw

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Posted 25 August 2013 - 08:50 AM

There have been several free performances on the mezzanine level of the museum In conjunction with the exhibition. That flat space open to any passersby, and in front of large, only partially blocked windows that let the sun shine into the audiences' eyes, is absolutely the most uncongenial space I've ever seen dance in, but the two performances of two ballets by Kirov Academy students (most of them just summer students at that) were a treat well worth a long drive anyhow. Artistic Director Martin Fredman, who told us this was his last day on the job, was a gracious and funny and slightly naughty  host. 

 
Here is Afternoon of a Faun with, naturally, a slightly toned down ending.
 
And here is the Firebird PDD.
 
For anyone not familiar with these dances, the background noise is not part of the scores!


#27 California

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Posted 25 August 2013 - 09:33 AM

 

. . . Artistic Director Martin Fredman, who told us this was his last day on the job, was a gracious and funny and slightly naughty  host.  . . .

 
 

 

Just curious: at the public presentation, did Freedman himself say anything about what he's doing next? (I'm not asking for gossip or speculation - just whether he himself said anything to the public audience at this event.)



#28 kfw

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Posted 25 August 2013 - 10:08 AM

 

 

. . . Artistic Director Martin Fredman, who told us this was his last day on the job, was a gracious and funny and slightly naughty  host.  . . .

 
 

 

Just curious: at the public presentation, did Freedman himself say anything about what he's doing next? (I'm not asking for gossip or speculation - just whether he himself said anything to the public audience at this event.)

 

 

No, not a word.



#29 sandik

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Posted 25 August 2013 - 01:52 PM

I'd be curious to know who staged and/or coached the Faun.



#30 Alexandra

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 07:24 AM

Sandi, it was Nikoloz Makhateli, who's now the boys' teacher at KAB.  (The dancer in the youtube video is Emerson Moose. The Firebird is Riho Sakamoto, who's only 15.)

 

The ending is from a tape of Lifar dancing the role, I was told.




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