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Monday, March 25


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#1 dirac

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Posted 25 March 2013 - 11:32 AM

A compare-and-contrast of two Mikhailovsky Giselles via video clips by Judith Mackrell in The Guardian.

The Mikhailovsky Ballet opens its London season this week with the most perfect of all romantic ballets, Giselle. With its title role pivoted between peasant girl and moonlit ghost, this 1841 work also offers ballerinas one of the most testing challenges of the repertory. And one of the tantalising attractions of the Mikhailovsky programme is the chance to see Olesya Novikova and Natalia Osipova dancing their two very different interpretations of the role.


Photo gallery.

#2 dirac

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Posted 25 March 2013 - 11:36 AM

Reviews of the Boston Ballet in "The Sleeping Beauty."

The Boston Globe

But in this production, the magic extends further. It uses Ninette de Valois’s staging from 1977 of Marius Petipa’s original choreography — which premiered in Russia in 1890 — with additional choreography by Frederick Ashton, and Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky’s glorious, melodic score. In so doing, Boston Ballet’s “Beauty” embodies the transformative power of art itself: the ballet awakens us to how music truly matched with dancing — from pristine solos to group manipulations that etch architectural wonders in the air — can create illusions that imprint in our minds and make our hearts soar.


The Patriot-Ledger

Of course, the focus is on the ballerina cast as Aurora, to watch her emerge from a teen-ager discovering the love of Prince Desiree after 100 years have passed. At opening night, Misa Kuranaga, was as perfect a Princess as one could imagine. In the legendary balances of the “Rose” adagio at her 16th birthday party, she was rock-steady on her pointes – a tiny girl on the cusp of womanhood, in contrast to the four tall and handsome Princes who came to woo her. Braintree’s Sabi Varga portrayed the French Prince, who was also her chief partner in Act I.



#3 dirac

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Posted 25 March 2013 - 11:38 AM

TV news item on St. Louis Ballet. Video.

Christopher D’Amboise is a former principal of the New York City Ballet. He is in town for the Saint Louis Ballet’s Contemporary Series in May.



#4 dirac

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Posted 25 March 2013 - 11:39 AM

A review of Ballet Frontier of Texas by Cheryl Callon for TheaterJones.

Some days you’re up, some days you’re down. Ballet Frontier of Texas’ An Evening of Ballet and Pinocchio at the W.E. Scott Theatre in Fort Worth is a roller-coaster ride of moments—good, bad and everything in between. As usual, the company brings in guests artists from Texas Ballet Theater. Paul Adams, Robin Bangert, Shane Howell, Paige Nyman, and Philip Slocki appear for this year’s offering.



#5 dirac

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Posted 25 March 2013 - 11:41 AM

Social notes on a benefit for Ballet Philippines.

Many enthusiastically complied with the Filipiniana dress code. Designer Lulu Tan Gan’s indigenous couture, consisting of handwoven piña but interpreted in modern lines was a popular choice. Dita Sandico Ong’s abaca wrap was another favorite, worn as a panuelo top.




#6 dirac

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Posted 25 March 2013 - 11:44 AM

A review of the National Ballet of Canada by Denise Sum for danceviewtimes.

"The Four Seasons" has been a signature piece of the NBoC since it's premiere in 1997. The ballet follows a proverbial everyman through the four seasons, literally and metaphorically, as he is visited by different women and eventually, a death figure. Antonio Vivaldi familiar music (aptly played by violinist Stephen Sitarski and the NBoC orchestra) is set against a backdrop of shifting coloured screens and silky costumes that move beautifully in muted neutral hues, designed by Carmen Alie and Denis Lavoie. The full cycle of life is represented: the freshness and naïveté of spring, passion and sensuality of summer, humility and groundedness of fall, and reflection and closure of winter.



#7 dirac

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 10:44 AM

The Bolshoi carries on, in every sense.

Despite the turmoil following the attack in mid-January on Bolshoi ballet artistic director Sergei Filin, the theater has continued without hesitation to follow the age-old precept "the show must go on." And this week it promises to do so with still greater intensity when it opens a four-week-long festival, "Century of 'The Rite of Spring' — Century of Modernism," dedicated to the 100th anniversary of the first performance of the ballet by Igor Stravinsky known in Russia as "Vesna Svashchennaya" (Holy Spring).



#8 dirac

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Posted 26 March 2013 - 10:45 AM

A review of New York Theatre Ballet by Alastair Macaulay in The New York Times.

New York Theater Ballet, however, dances “Dark Elegies” without scenery — and to taped music. (Usually the baritone performing the songs is onstage, dressed the same way as the male dancers.) Though this is a loss, and though the company’s dancers are on the young and polite side, the ballet still makes a complex impact. With mature performers, the work’s suffering can become ritualized; these innocent performers seem touchingly to be discovering their own emotion.



#9 dirac

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Posted 27 March 2013 - 11:48 AM

A review of the Stanislavsky Ballet in 'Mayerling' by Natalie Wheen for The Arts Desk.

So I’ll begin with Polunin: though it will be impossible to do justice to what he showed us on stage. He started his journey as a troubled young man from the very beginning: after the arrogance of the wedding proceedings, his Rudolf emerged from the crowd and started his first solo with such fluidity that the change was imperceptible. In and out of the balletic gestures as he moved around the crowd, gradually revealing the reality of his circumstances: contempt for the courtiers, chilly distance from his father, his expectation still to have the pick of the women (married or not) and his terrible ache for his unresponsive mother.




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