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Global ballet


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#1 Kerry1968

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 11:49 PM

I'd love to hear other people's opinions on these questions.
  • Does the presence of so many Asian and Brazilian dancers at competitions like YAGP and Prix de Lausanne say anything about where the art is heading?
  • Is it a fair inference to say that the training outside of Europe and America is approaching the standards of European and American schools?
  • Has ballet taken root in Asia (as measured by public interest, and financially secure companies), or is the goal of Asian dancers to win a scholarship at a competition, complete their training in Europe or America, and get a job with a European or American company?
  • Will ballet globalization create a market for a homogenized and commodified style of dance, free of regional flavor?
  • Will globalization necessarily wreck ballet, by flattening style and repertoire, or can it be a source of renewal?
I hope these questions aren't very ignorant. These things have been churning in my brain for many years, and I don't know where to look for answers.:

PS. Did I post this thread in the wrong place?

#2 Jayne

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 03:17 PM

Does the presence of so many Asian and Brazilian dancers at competitions like YAGP and Prix de Lausanne say anything about where the art is heading?

I think it shows that the 'perception' in those regions is that the only way to get a professional position is to compete and build up awards / scholarships that they can put on their resumes.

Is it a fair inference is to say that the training outside of Europe and America is approaching the standards of European and American schools?

The Cubans have benefited from Soviet era access to international coaching of the highest level, and the legacy is being taught today.


Has ballet taken root in Asia (as measured by public interest, and financially secure companies), or is the goal of Asian dancers to win a scholarship at a competition, complete their training in Europe or America, and get a job with a European or American company?

Based on the number of ballet companies in Europe and Canada / US, I'd say that Asia and Latin America are further back in the time line for developing audiences, secure government support and non profit funding. For that reason, dancers travel to "get seen" in competitions, or to finish their educations at schools in North America and Europe.

Will ballet globalization create a market for a homogenized and commodified style of dance, free of regional flavor?
Will globalization necessarily wreck ballet, by flattening style and repertoire, or can it be a source of renewal?

Do you think NYCB, POB, Mariinsky and Bolshoi all use the same style? On the other hand, I think the polyglot nature of most rep companies is hindering additional style developments. If you look at the schedules for PNB, Barcelona and ENB, they share a number of choreographers for mixed reps. Maybe in 20 years they will all look the same? But maybe not....


PS. Did I post this thread in the wrong place?

The mods will tell you soon enough and move the thread if necessary.

#3 cubanmiamiboy

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Posted 03 March 2013 - 01:39 PM

Is it a fair inference is to say that the training outside of Europe and America is approaching the standards of European and American schools?


I can speak only in lieu of my native country to say that training outside Europe and America has been proving highly effective there since the early 60's-(even more than now). The Cuban method was molded after the mixing schooling of the Imperial Russian-(Mikhail/Alexander/Leon Fokine-Alexandra Fedorova) and Italian Ceccetti-(Enrico Zanfretta)- of both Fernando and Alicia Alonso during the late 40's, early 50's. By the time the school was already producing its first golden generation-(Pla, Mendez, Saa sisters, Araujo, Bosch, etc...)-it had definitely also being highly influenced by their American schooling-(which at the time was basically Imperial Russian, but with a distinctive characteristic American speed as AA mentions). The 60's, 70's and 80's were definitely richer than the 90's, 2000's and what we see today.

The Cubans have benefited from Soviet era access to international coaching of the highest level, and the legacy is being taught today.


Let me agree to disagree here, Jayne. The Cuban school method as developed by Fernando Alonso was completely untouched by the Soviet Union. Remember that not Fernando, nor Alicia had access to see the new Vaganova method way after the Revolution in '59, at a time when the Cuban school syllabus was already firmly established. One of the anecdotes that Roca recounts in his book was that after the first visit of a Cuban dancer-(Lazaro Carreno, Jose Manuel's uncle)-to dance in the Soviet Union and take some classes there, he had to be continuously corrected in his return from his new Soviet mannerisms, which both Alicia and Fernando disliked. The real, ideal mold of Alicia's female dancer has always been Markova, and for the men, Mr. Youskevitch.


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