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Thursday, February 28


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11 replies to this topic

#1 dirac

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 11:15 AM

Pennsylvania Ballet celebrates its fiftieth anniversary.

Later in the 2013-14 season, it will premiere new works by important contemporary choreographers Trey McIntyre and Matthew Neenan.

In a nod to its own artistic lineage, the company will bring in pieces old (Balanchine's Serenade) and new, by former artistic directors Christopher d'Amboise and Robert (Ricky) Weiss.


Related.

The company's $17.5 million home is open on North Broad Street, also known as Philadelphia's Avenue of the Arts.

It includes the Pennsylvania Ballet school as well as five rehearsal studios and administrative offices. The company for many years had worked out of rented studios and office buildings in several locations.



#2 dirac

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 11:21 AM

A review of the Birmingham Royal Ballet in 'Aladdin' by Louise Levene in The Telegraph.

Kidnapped maidens, lustful pashas and drugged drinks are standard ballet fare (Sylvia, Scheherazade, Corsaire) but Aladdin’s steps are often equally formulaic. Bintley justifies the cookie-cutter nature of the choreography by arguing that the Japanese troupe had lacked experience and acting skill, but the real trouble lies with the uninspiring music (manfully delivered by Paul Murphy and the Royal Ballet Sinfonia).



#3 dirac

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 11:22 AM

A preview of the 13th International Mariinsky Ballet Festival.

The festival will also show another new performance of the theatre’s ballet company, the ballet The Midsummer Night’s Dream. Its author is legendary 20th century choreographer George Balanchine, a graduate of the St. Petersburg ballet school who became the key figure in the development of classical ballet in the US. Sandra Jennings, once a soloist in Balanchine’s company and now a ballet teacher, prepared this performance with the Mariinsky dancers.



#4 dirac

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 11:32 AM

Dancers of the English National Ballet essay the Harlem Shake. Video.

This one sees footage of the corps du ballet interrupted with members of the company doing the unruly dance move.



#5 dirac

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 11:34 AM

A review of the ENB in "The Sleeping Beauty" by Matt Merritt in The Portsmouth News.

With such faultless performing throughout, it seems unfair to single out any performers at the expense of the rest. But Laurretta Summerscales as the lilac fairy lights up the stage every time she enters the proceedings and Fernanda Oliveira, dancing the role of Aurora, shows a delicate poise and a real technical ability.



#6 dirac

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 11:37 AM

A preview in brief of Dance Theatre of Tennessee.

The program features the music of George Gershwin (“Who Cares?”), restaged by former New York City ballet soloist Stacey Calvert; “Passion, There,” a view on relationships set to scintillating tango music; and an as-yet-untitled piece that experiments with movements and music that evoke classicism with a modern edge



#7 dirac

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 11:29 AM

A review of the National Ballet of China in "Swan Lake" by Janet Smith for Straight.com.

As for Siegfried, it’s always hard to live up to the transfixing female star, and this rendition was no different. Li Jun, of course, had impeccable technical chops, pulling off killer combinations, rising effortlessly en relevé, and circling the stage in unwavering jetés. But in the more emotional scenes—when refusing his mother’s insistence on marriage or desperate after finding out he’s been duped by Odile—he looked more lost than tormented. And chemistry with Wang? Not so much. Even the death scene, with a black fabric wave taking over the couple, seemed rushed and deprived of melodrama.



#8 dirac

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 11:33 AM

A preview of Boston Ballet's "All Kylián " program by Karen Campbell in The Boston Globe.

Kylián suffers from a fear of flying and has never seen Boston Ballet live. For him to entrust the company with his choreography meant he had to send someone to Boston to check it out. After 2005 presentations of Kylián’s “Sarabande” and “Falling Angels,” which apparently met the stagers’ expectations of quality and stylistic authenticity, Boston Ballet became the first besides Nederlands Dans Theater to do the full-evening “Black and White,” in 2009. It was so successful that it was programmed in back-to-back subscription seasons. In 2011, Boston Ballet became the first American company to perform the flamboyant “Bella Figura,” which was another Kylián hit for the company.



#9 dirac

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 11:35 AM

Photos of Ballet Black in "War Letters."

Members of the Ballet Black company perform in War Letters, which opened last night at the Linbury Studio, Royal Opera House. It sets the plight of lonely wartime women and a soldier in turmoil against the thrill of London dance halls and the Blitz spirit. It runs till March 6.



#10 dirac

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 11:55 AM

A list of notable elements in San Francisco Ballet's third program of the season by Becca Klarin for the SF Appeal.

1. Jennifer Stahl's breakout, look-at-me-and-my-luscious-phrasing turn in the premiere of Yuri Possokhov's new "The Rite of Spring": Stahl offers more than just an embodiment of Possokhov's organic, ground-driven movement. She fills her sacrificial role with raw fire and confident technique.



#11 dirac

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 12:01 PM

A review of the New York Philharmonic's "Carousel" by Charles Isherwood in The New York Times.

Paired opposite Robert Fairchild, another terrific principal dancer from the same company, Ms. Peck all but stops the show with her radiant performance in the second-act ballet, choreographed skillfully if somewhat generically by Warren Carlyle. Granted a chance to descend to earth for a single day, Billy watches in astonishment as his teenage daughter sweeps recklessly through her dance, her juvenile high spirits a mirror of his own heedlessness. Ms. Peck dances with such emotional fervor that we can only share his speechless wonder at the beauty, the joy and — oh, if only we could know it at the time! — the folly of youth.


Related.

New York City Ballet principal dancers Robert Fairchild and Tiler Peck perform the "If I Loved You" pas de deux ballet, as the Carnival Boy and Louise, respectively.



#12 dirac

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 09:59 PM

A review of San Francisco Ballet by Janice Berman for San Francisco Classical Voice.

George Balanchine’s Scotch Symphony and Christopher Wheeldon’s In the Golden Hour were terrific, while the much-anticipated world premiere, Alexei Ratmansky’s From Foreign Lands, never quite found its footing — this, notwithstanding its cast’s lively renditions of the European survey, all set to the music of Moritz Moszkowski: Russian, Italian, German, Spanish, Polish, and Hungarian national dance styles.

George Balanchine’s Scotch Symphony and Christopher Wheeldon’s In the Golden Hour were terrific, while the much-anticipated world premiere, Alexei Ratmansky’s From Foreign Lands, never quite found its footing — this, notwithstanding its cast’s lively renditions of the European survey, all set to the music of Moritz Moszkowski: Russian, Italian, German, Spanish, Polish, and Hungarian national dance styles - See more at: http://www.sfcv.org/...h.JvOylyjh.dpuf
George Balanchine’s Scotch Symphony and Christopher Wheeldon’s In the Golden Hour were terrific, while the much-anticipated world premiere, Alexei Ratmansky’s From Foreign Lands, never quite found its footing — this, notwithstanding its cast’s lively renditions of the European survey, all set to the music of Moritz Moszkowski: Russian, Italian, German, Spanish, Polish, and Hungarian national dance styles - See more at: http://www.sfcv.org/...h.JvOylyjh.dpuf


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