Jump to content


Tuesday, February 19


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,892 posts

Posted 19 February 2013 - 11:44 AM

A review of the Birmingham Royal Ballet in "Aladdin" by Laura Thompson in The Telegraph.

Undoubtedly the work is a delightful family show, and an ideal first outing to the ballet. A full-blown piece of three-act splendour, originally choreographed by BRB director David Bintley in Japan in 2008, it looks absolutely astonishing; in fact its real star is set designer Dick Bird, who creates scene after scene of retina-ravishing beauty.



#2 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,892 posts

Posted 19 February 2013 - 11:50 AM

A preview of Les Ballets Trockadero de Monte Carlo by Kelly Apter for The List.

Back in Edinburgh as part of a UK tour, this time the programme will feature Les Sylphides, Pas de Deux, La Vivandière and Walpurgis Night. In keeping with the Trocks show trajectory, from wit to wow, the show will close with a piece performed exactly as the choreographer intended.

Walpurgis Night is already so kitschy, that when we tried to add stuff in, it was too much,’ says Dobrin. ‘So I said it’s a beautiful dance, let’s just do it straight -- so that’s our closer.’



#3 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,892 posts

Posted 19 February 2013 - 11:52 AM

Ballet Austin's headquarters will serve as the performance space for the Chaddick Dance Theater.

Upon arriving at the two-story building where Ballet Austin rehearses, holds shows and offers classes, people coming to see “Interior Landscape” will be divided into three groups and led around to six of the different spots before they meet up again in the Armstrong Connelly studio, one of the larger rooms, for the finale showcasing all 10 of the dancers together. The three groups will see the dances at each location, but at different times, Chaddick said.



#4 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,892 posts

Posted 19 February 2013 - 11:55 AM

A review of Pacific Northwest Ballet by Andrew and Ellen Blackmore-Dobbyn/Dobbyn-Blackmore for Broadway World.

Maillot's choreography can be characterized as intense, speedy and precise. At times there is more action in this ballet than the eye can easily take in. While this is a departure from the model of the older classical story ballets it is still very much grounded in classical technique. He avoids clichés in his steps that make the older ballets so familiar to us that we sometimes feel we know them before we see them because they are nearly the same sequences of steps as in every other ballet. This aspect alone makes the ballet feel new again.



#5 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,892 posts

Posted 20 February 2013 - 10:59 AM

Andrew Blackmore-Dobbyn goes backstage at the Pacific Northwest Ballet's "Romeo et Juliette."

The first and most important thing to notice in this rehearsal was that the dancers love this piece. When not on the floor dancing, they were all watching action and paying close attention to Maillot's comments and corrections. The full company spontaneously and enthusiastically applauded after the run-through of Romeo and Juliet's pas de deux. That's rare. They don't have to applaud and it isn't customary. They clearly feel strongly about this intimate and deeply touching pas de deux. They also seemed to enjoy their own dancing. It is extremely physical and requires lots of speed as well as stamina.....



#6 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,892 posts

Posted 20 February 2013 - 11:07 AM

Music notes on the San Francisco Ballet Orchestra's performances of "Nijinsky" by Janos Gereben for San Francisco Classical Voice.

Between Friday evening and Sunday afternoon, the San Francisco Ballet Orchestra and most of the Hamburg Ballet (except for double-cast principal roles) performed John Neumeier's Nijinsky four times. That meant, among other trials and tribulations, performing the entire 67-minute Shostakovich Symphony No. 11 — which serves the ballet's second act — four times in 40 hours.



#7 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,892 posts

Posted 20 February 2013 - 11:10 AM

A review of New York City Ballet by Alastair Macaulay in The New York Times.

If there are any technicians in this company who can exemplify the “less haste, more speed” style needed to bring this staging into full dance focus, they are surely Ashley Bouder and Tiler Peck, dancers of extraordinary lucidity at any tempo. Both, however, fell short of the mark. Ms. Bouder, after dancing many other roles in top form this season, was a pugnacious, swaggering Aurora, insolent in holding balances, strutting her stuff at her wedding with prizefighter merriment.

Ms. Peck, though a far subtler artist, doesn’t yet have the secret of addressing either her colleagues or her audience as if they were part of her world: though she’s stylish and finished, she’s somewhat slick. And neither dances as if the music’s drama were her priority

.

#8 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,892 posts

Posted 20 February 2013 - 11:22 AM

A review of Pacific Northwest Ballet by Carol Pardo for danceviewtimes.

And so anticipation accelerated as one filed in to the auditorium. "Apollo" and "Agon" were on the bill. The music was live, an almost unheard of treat for touring companies and their audiences, under the batons of Emil de Cou, once of American Ballet Theatre and the San Francisco Ballet, and Allan Dameron. "Agon" and "Concerto Barocco" were presented as staged by Francia Russell, former co-director of the company. Here was our chance to compare her versions of these ballets, taken from her dancing days in the 1950’s and ‘60’s with those, more familiar, performed today in New York. The staging of "Apollo" Boal’s own, and less than a year old, is the truncated version from 1979, shorn of its narrative, a chance to compare performances of the same text. There we were ready for liftoff, but the evening remained stubbornly earthbound. Each work had its aha moment, but none shown with the compelling immediacy on view at the last September.



#9 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,892 posts

Posted 21 February 2013 - 10:20 AM

Michael van Baker defends Jean-Christophe Maillot against the criticisms of Alastair Macaulay in The SunBreak. Hat tip to sandik for sending in the link!

Macaulay writes a great many reviews under deadline, and knows a great deal about ballet; but he’s not immune from pernicious habits of mind that warp his critical observations (it’s hard to clearly see something you imagine you don’t care for). He’s scrupulous in his fairness to the dancers of PNB, but it’s unfortunate he couldn’t engage with Maillot’s work on a less trivial level.



#10 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,892 posts

Posted 21 February 2013 - 11:38 AM

Mobile Ballet presents "Winthrop Corey's Snow White."

The new production stars former New York City Ballet dancer Kathryn Morgan as Snow White and Kimberley Sears as the evil queen.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


Help support Ballet Alert! and Ballet Talk for Dancers year round by using this search box for your amazon.com purchases (adblockers may block display):