Jump to content


What have we seen live onstage?-(XIX Cent. Ballet Poll)


  • Please log in to reply
55 replies to this topic

Poll: Which of this ballets have we seen live? (43 member(s) have cast votes)

What have we seen live...?

  1. Giselle (42 votes [23.46%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 23.46%

  2. La Sylphide-(Bournonville) (31 votes [17.32%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 17.32%

  3. La Sylphide-(Taglioni/Lacotte's recreation) (6 votes [3.35%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 3.35%

  4. Grand Pas de Quatre-(Dolin's recreation) (19 votes [10.61%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 10.61%

  5. La Fille Mal Gardee-(Nijinska/Balachova or any "after Gorsky/Petipa") (5 votes [2.79%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 2.79%

  6. La Fille Mal Gardee-(Ashton's recreation) (32 votes [17.88%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 17.88%

  7. Le Conservatoire-(Bournonville) (10 votes [5.59%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 5.59%

  8. Nappoli-(Bournonville) (21 votes [11.73%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 11.73%

  9. A Folk Tale-(Bournonville) (11 votes [6.15%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 6.15%

  10. The Awakening of Flora-(Vikharev's recreation) (2 votes [1.12%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 1.12%

What have we seen live...?

  1. Don Quixote (40 votes [12.62%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 12.62%

  2. La Bayadere (36 votes [11.36%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 11.36%

  3. Raymonda (23 votes [7.26%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 7.26%

  4. Coppelia (37 votes [11.67%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 11.67%

  5. Le Corsaire (29 votes [9.15%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 9.15%

  6. Sylvia-(Ashton's recreation) (20 votes [6.31%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 6.31%

  7. The Nutcracker (42 votes [13.25%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 13.25%

  8. Sleeping Beauty (41 votes [12.93%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 12.93%

  9. Swan Lake-(Full Lenght) (42 votes [13.25%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 13.25%

  10. Paquita-(Lacotte's Full Lenght recreation) (7 votes [2.21%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 2.21%

What have we seen live...?

  1. La Esmeralda-(Burlaka's or any other full lenght recreation) (2 votes [3.17%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 3.17%

  2. Le Talisman-(Paul Chalmer's recreation) (1 votes [1.59%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 1.59%

  3. The Pharaoh's daughter-(Lacotte's recreation) (10 votes [15.87%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 15.87%

  4. Ondine-(Lacotte's recreation) (2 votes [3.17%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 3.17%

  5. La Source-(Bart's recreation) (1 votes [1.59%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 1.59%

  6. La Peri-(Malakhov's recreation) (1 votes [1.59%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 1.59%

  7. The Magic Flute-(Peter Martins or Alonso's recreation) (13 votes [20.63%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 20.63%

  8. La Kermesse in Bruges(Bournonville) (8 votes [12.70%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 12.70%

  9. Les Millions d'Arlequin-(Alonso's/Lopukhov's/Balanchine's recreations) (3 votes [4.76%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 4.76%

  10. None of these (22 votes [34.92%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 34.92%

Vote Guests cannot vote

#46 cubanmiamiboy

cubanmiamiboy

    Diamonds Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,217 posts

Posted 10 February 2013 - 09:58 AM

ok, I voted but had to fudge the first category by selecting a ballet (see post above), although I haven't actually seen any ballets in cat 1 live. I chose Giselle because I WILL see it live this summer...


Aawww..your first Giselle..! Posted Image ("If I could turn back time..." Cher)

BTW...happy to report that Giselle, Swan Lake and Nutcracker have been thightly even in votes for a while now. Sleeping Beauty always falls one vote less than the rest.

#47 sandik

sandik

    Rubies Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,348 posts

Posted 10 February 2013 - 12:31 PM

Oh, how I agree. Privately, I still call it the better name! IMO, a truly cultured philanthropist would have insisted on no name change.


I know this is a tangent, so I'll be brief. We've discussed the use of power by philanthropists in other threads, but I just wanted to raise a hand here -- I understand the desire for recognition, and don't really mind it when new projects are named for the donors that fund them, but it is hard when a well-known title is discarded after years of use for a new name that reflects a substantial gift. Here in Seattle we've had an ironical experience in the last few years. Our opera house, which was opened using public money in the first half of the 20th c as the Civic Auditorium, and was translated into the Opera House in the 1960s, was remodeled extensively in the 90s and renamed in honor of the main donors' mother (it is officially Marion Oliver McCaw Hall -- I was lobbying for the familiar name to be Mom Hall, but it's McCaw Hall in all our listings). At around the same time a group of local donors helped to fund a new project for the local art museum -- an outdoor sculpture park. They insisted that it be named after the mountain range you see from the part, so it is the Olympic Sculpture Park. One of the donors, who was the most insistent on not using donor names, died recently -- Mary Shirley was a major participant in the local art world, gave money thoughtfully and generously, and whenever I see the park mentioned in the press, I'm always grateful for the relative anonymity of the gift.

Not so brief after all, and I apologize, but I wanted to say something about her in public and this seemed like the appropriate place.

#48 sandik

sandik

    Rubies Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,348 posts

Posted 10 February 2013 - 12:40 PM

Perhaps I wrongly assumed that "Giselle" was the secure choice for everybody.


At one point in our history I think this would have been a safe bet, but repertories have shifted and the Romantic works (both originals and their descendents) are performed far less often than in the past. Although my local company did add Giselle to their rep a couple years ago (they've done Swan Lake and Sleeping Beauty for several years now) it has been ages since I've seen Les Sylphides performed by a fully-professional company, either in a home season or on tour. I think there are a multitude of reasons for this, not the least of them the development of neoclassical ballet. You may want this to spin out to a separate thread, but I'll ask here since I'm already here -- is the distinction between classical and romantic ballet a viable one today (not just as a divider between chunks of the historical rep)? Do people think of Giselle differently than they do the Petipa classics (never mind that most of the material we know of Giselle was restaged and revamped by Petipa...) or do they just think of it all as generically old?

#49 bart

bart

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,320 posts

Posted 10 February 2013 - 04:34 PM

At one point in our history I think this would have been a safe bet, but repertories have shifted and the Romantic works (both originals and their descendents) are performed far less often than in the past. Although my local company did add Giselle to their rep a couple years ago (they've done Swan Lake and Sleeping Beauty for several years now) it has been ages since I've seen Les Sylphides performed by a fully-professional company, either in a home season or on tour. I think there are a multitude of reasons for this, not the least of them the development of neoclassical ballet. You may want this to spin out to a separate thread, but I'll ask here since I'm already here -- is the distinction between classical and romantic ballet a viable one today (not just as a divider between chunks of the historical rep)? Do people think of Giselle differently than they do the Petipa classics (never mind that most of the material we know of Giselle was restaged and revamped by Petipa...) or do they just think of it all as generically old?


An interesting question, which definitely deserves its own thread. I'll start one , in the AESTHETIC ISSUES forum, unless others would prefer to it to be in Everything Else Ballet.

Here is its: http://balletalert.i...al-distinction/

#50 AlbanyGirl

AlbanyGirl

    Senior Member

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 233 posts

Posted 10 February 2013 - 06:51 PM


Oh, how I agree. Privately, I still call it the better name! IMO, a truly cultured philanthropist would have insisted on no name change.


I know this is a tangent, so I'll be brief. We've discussed the use of power by philanthropists in other threads, but I just wanted to raise a hand here -- I understand the desire for recognition, and don't really mind it when new projects are named for the donors that fund them, but it is hard when a well-known title is discarded after years of use for a new name that reflects a substantial gift. Here in Seattle we've had an ironical experience in the last few years. Our opera house, which was opened using public money in the first half of the 20th c as the Civic Auditorium, and was translated into the Opera House in the 1960s, was remodeled extensively in the 90s and renamed in honor of the main donors' mother (it is officially Marion Oliver McCaw Hall -- I was lobbying for the familiar name to be Mom Hall, but it's McCaw Hall in all our listings). At around the same time a group of local donors helped to fund a new project for the local art museum -- an outdoor sculpture park. They insisted that it be named after the mountain range you see from the part, so it is the Olympic Sculpture Park. One of the donors, who was the most insistent on not using donor names, died recently -- Mary Shirley was a major participant in the local art world, gave money thoughtfully and generously, and whenever I see the park mentioned in the press, I'm always grateful for the relative anonymity of the gift.

Not so brief after all, and I apologize, but I wanted to say something about her in public and this seemed like the appropriate place.


Sandik, thank you for your post and responding. I agree and and it infuriates me that this particular theater and the spirit in which it was built, had to be renamed.

#51 Birdsall

Birdsall

    Platinum Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,294 posts

Posted 10 February 2013 - 08:29 PM

I was going to click on Grand pas de quatre, but Cristian told me Les Trockaderos does not count! LOL LOL

#52 cubanmiamiboy

cubanmiamiboy

    Diamonds Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,217 posts

Posted 10 February 2013 - 08:33 PM

I was going to click on Grand pas de quatre, but Cristian told me Les Trockaderos does not count! LOL LOL


Well, it is just that their choreo, even as a tribute to Dolin's, certainly ommits a great deal of it, so I don't know...it doesn't sound as a good fit-(although i could be wrong...)

#53 sandik

sandik

    Rubies Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,348 posts

Posted 10 February 2013 - 09:14 PM

I was going to click on Grand pas de quatre, but Cristian told me Les Trockaderos does not count! LOL LOL


Sometimes the Trocks do a very straight performance of a landmark work, the humor coming strictly from the gender substitution, but I haven't seen their PdQ in a long time, so I'm not sure what they're up to right now. They'll be in Seattle later this spring, though, and I'm looking forward to seeing them.

#54 cubanmiamiboy

cubanmiamiboy

    Diamonds Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,217 posts

Posted 07 March 2013 - 10:50 AM

A few words to thank you all for your contribution to this thread and your voting. My intention was to evaluate the degree of familiarity of BT'rs, whom I believe are pretty much representative of the most knowledge side of the audience, to the cornerstones of the art form. I had a few surprises, as which how few votes works like "Grand Pas de Quatre" or Nijinska's derivative of "Fille" got. Other works, like Bournonville's-(with the exception of "La Sylphide")-seem to be even less known for a majority-(me included...Sylphide is the only one I know, and the usual excerpts from Flower Festival), and some recreations, like "Ondine", "La Peri", "Le Talisman" or "La Source" seem to be even more tucked in in their urns. Then, I know there is a vast number of ballet lovers whom, as bart once wrote, basically see ballet as what Balanchine made of it, which I have come to realize is a whole world of its own, with a vast repertoire and a specific pathos and language.

Still, I'm happy to report "Giselle" ended up hand in hand with "The Nutcracker" and "Swan Lake"-(38 votes each)-closely followed by "Sleeping Beauty"-(37)-, "Coppelia"-(33)-and "La Bayadere"-(32).

Again, thank you all and Happy Ballet Viewing, and here are the winners! Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image






#55 Kerry1968

Kerry1968

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 74 posts

Posted 08 March 2013 - 02:46 AM

Cristian what about Don Q?

#56 cubanmiamiboy

cubanmiamiboy

    Diamonds Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,217 posts

Posted 11 March 2013 - 07:11 PM

Cristian what about Don Q?


Third place with 40 votes! Posted Image



0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


Help support Ballet Alert! and Ballet Talk for Dancers year round by using this search box for your amazon.com purchases (adblockers may block display):