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Saturday, February 2


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#1 dirac

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 05:04 PM

Two reviews of the Hamburg Ballet in "Nijinsky."

The Chicago Tribune

True to the aesthetics of its title character, "Nijinsky" doesn't tell a linear story, but plays as a kind of abstract meditation, albeit a sometimes frenzied one, unfolding with dreamlike stream-of-consciousness as figures from real life and fictional ballets emerge, recede, reappear and intermingle. It opens with Nijinsky's final performance in a St. Moritz ballroom and then evolves into a surrealistic dreamscape dotted with scenes of the dancer-choreographer's life as well as key characters from various ballets.


TimeOut Chicago (blog)

There were tears of joy at the conclusion of Hamburg Ballet’s Chicago debut last night, mostly from company director/choreographer John Neumeier. The audience showed its appreciation with a standing ovation. It was a memorable homecoming for the Midwest native who’s been based in Europe for more than 40 years. For it, he brought his much-anticipated story-ballet Nijinsky, playing two nights at the Harris Theater.



#2 dirac

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 05:06 PM

A review of Tulsa Ballet in "Lady of the Camellias" by James D. Watts Jr. for Tulsa World.

It shows that Caniparoli has paid equal attention to details of theatre as well as dance –– there are no anonymous performers in this story, no dance sequence that exists simply to fill space on the stage. Everything is there to tell a relatively simple, yet still very rich, story.

And this story –– perhaps the most famous, and certainly the most adapted, romantic tale after “Romeo and Juliet” –– is superbly told by Tulsa Ballet’s dancers.



#3 dirac

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 05:08 PM

Ballet Kelowna shuts up shop.

Maw said the company is at the point where it will be able to retire its financial obligations responsibly, having maintained balanced budgets over its ten-year history. “Our financial forecasting tells us six months from now, that will no longer be the case. As much as we would love to continue supporting dance in Kelowna, we owe it to the City and to our funders to act with fiduciary responsibility.”

The shutdown coincides with the retirement of artistic director David LaHay, who established the company after moving to Kelowna in 2002.



#4 dirac

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 05:12 PM

Company Ballet School moves into bigger digs.

“Everybody came ready to work,” said parent volunteer Audrey Bramel, who spent the day vacuuming. “Everyone had their job, working together to make this happen for Jonna.”

Crews of volunteers tore down walls, pulled nails, stacked wood from the demolition to be reused later, and removed debris.



#5 dirac

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 05:13 PM

A preview of the Hamburg Ballet in "The Little Mermaid" by Susan Josephs in The Los Angeles Times.

Commissioned in 2005 by the Royal Danish Ballet to celebrate Andersen's 200th birthday, "The Little Mermaid" has subsequently both delighted and shocked audiences worldwide with its adult sophistication and fidelity to the original tale of brutal self-sacrifice and unrequited love. The ballet, which Neumeier revised for his company's repertory in 2007, will receive its Southern California premiere when Hamburg Ballet visits Segerstrom Center for the Arts this week.




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