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Balanchine Interpreters Archive/ Gloria Govrin/ in Dance View

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The Winter 2013 issue of Dance View contains another in the series of "George Balanchine Foundation Interpreters Archive and Works and Process."

Leigh Witchel reports on Gloria Govrin's sessions with Teresa Reichlen (Hippolyta, A Midsummer Night's Dream), Georgina Pazoquin (Coffee, The Nutcracker), and Emily Kikta, first movement, Brahms-Schoenberg Quartet).

Every one of the articles in this series has been fascinating and educational, especially as to what the reveal about they way small and not-so-small details have changed inexplicably (and perhaps inevitably) in the years since Balanchine's death. The entire series tends to be made into a book. (And wouldn't it be nice if the Foundation could persuade everyone involved to allow a release of the videos as well.)

Among the revelations here:

-- Balanchine's use of the gliding motion of Georgian folk dancers in Coffee's entry;

-- Govrin's choice of a tempo "that seems at least 20 percent faster throughout" the Coffee variation; [Pianist Nancy] McDill registers her surprise. "that's a lot faster. But then again, a lot of our rep has slowed down over the years. Govrin channels Balanchine channeling Tchaikovsky for her answer. 'He said to me, "That's what Tchaikovsky wanted.'"

-- Pazoquin's admission that she is not about to do the Govrin version on stage. "Sotto voce to McDill, 'Do not tell people!' 'I wouldn't,' McDill assures her."

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The Winter 2013 issue of Dance View contains another in the series of "George Balanchine Foundation Interpreters Archive and Works and Process."

Leigh Witchel reports on Gloria Govrin's sessions with Teresa Reichlen (Hippolyta, A Midsummer Night's Dream), Georgina Pazoquin (Coffee, The Nutcracker), and Emily Kikta, first movement, Brahms-Schoenberg Quartet).

Every one of the articles in this series has been fascinating and educational, especially as to what the reveal about they way small and not-so-small details have changed inexplicably (and perhaps inevitably) in the years since Balanchine's death. The entire series tends to be made into a book. (And wouldn't it be nice if the Foundation could persuade everyone involved to allow a release of the videos as well.)

I was thinking exactly the same thing while I was reading the article yesterday! Well, almost the same thing: I want to compile them all into a tablet app with embedded video clips and the like -- something along the lines of Merce 65.

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