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Irina Dvorovenko Retiring from ABT


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#1 aurora

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 11:31 AM

Hi, not sure if this is the place for it but Dvorovenko is retiring.
Her May 18th Tatiana is her final performance with the company.

http://artsbeat.blog...ater/?src=twrhp

#2 Amy Reusch

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 12:52 PM

Perhaps they will do a joint farewell?

#3 Dale

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 09:08 AM

From the company:

IRINA DVOROVENKO TO GIVE FINAL PERFORMANCE WITH

AMERICAN BALLET THEATRE


Farewell Performance Scheduled for Saturday evening, May 18

at Metropolitan Opera House



Irina Dvorovenko, a Principal Dancer with American Ballet Theatre since 2000, will give her final performance with the Company on May 18, 2013 at the Metropolitan Opera House in the role of Tatiana in Onegin. Dvorovenko will dance opposite Cory Stearns in the role of Eugene Onegin.
Born in Kiev, Ukraine, Irina Dvorovenko began her ballet training at the age of 10 at the Kiev Ballet School. She joined the National Opera and Ballet Theatre of Kiev in 1990 as a soloist, rising to the rank of principal dancer in 1992. Her repertoire with that company included Gamzatti in La Bayadère, the title roles in Cinderella and Paquita, Kitri, the Queen of the Driads, and Mercedes in Don Quixote, Giselle and Myrta in Giselle, the Sugar Plum Fairy in The Nutcracker, Princess Aurora and Princess Florine in The Sleeping Beauty, Odette-Odile in Swan Lake and the Tchaikovsky Pas de deux. She also danced
the pas de deux Le Corsaire and Diana and Acteon.
Dvorovenko's awards include a Gold Medal and the “Anna Pavlova” Prize at the International Ballet Competition in Moscow (1992), the Grand Prix at the International Ballet Competition Serge Lifar in the Ukraine (1994), a Diploma and the Grand Prix in the Junior Division of the Ukraine Ballet Competition (1987), a Diploma in the Junior Division of the Moscow Ballet Competition (1988), a Silver Medal at the Jackson International Ballet Competition (1990), and a Bronze Medal at the International Ballet Competition in Osaka, Japan (1991).
Dvorovenko joined American Ballet Theatre in August 1996 and was promoted to Soloist in 1997. She was appointed Principal Dancer in August 2000. Her repertoire with the Company includes Terpsichore and Polyhymnia in Apollo, Mathilda Kchessinska
and the Tsarina in Anastasia, Nikiya and Gamzatti in La Bayadère, the second movement in Bruch Violin Concerto No. 1, the title role in Ben Stevenson’s Cinderella, Swanilda in Coppélia, Medora in Le Corsaire, Kitri and Mercedes in Don Quixote, The Dying Swan, Giselle, Myrta and the peasant pas de deux in Giselle, Grand Pas Classique, the Queen of Hearts in Jeu de Cartes, the pas de deux from Known by Heart, Le Grand Pas de Deux, Marguerite in Lady of the Camellias, Hanna Glawari and Valencienne in The Merry Widow, the Sugar Plum Fairy in Kevin McKenzie’s The Nutcracker, the Operetta Star in Offenbach in the Underworld, Tatiana in Onegin, the Paquita pas de deux, Cerrito and Taglioni in
Pas des Déesses, the Siren in Prodigal Son, Raymonda in Raymonda, Juliet in Romeo and Juliet, Princess Aurora in The Sleeping Beauty, Odette-Odile in Swan Lake, the first and second movements in Symphony in C, the Sylvia Pas de Deux, Katherina in The Taming of the Shrew and the Tchaikovsky Pas de Deux. Dvorovenko has performed leading roles in Allegro Brillante, Birthday Offering, Études, In The Upper Room, Petite Mort,
Les Sylphides, Symphonie Concertante and Without Words and a featured role in Push Comes to Shove. She created a leading role in The Brahms/Haydn Variations.
Following her final performance with American Ballet Theatre, Dvorovenko plans to continue performing as a guest artist with companies around the world.
Subscriptions for American Ballet Theatre’s 2013 Spring season at the Metropolitan Opera House are on sale now by phone at 212-362-6000, or online at ABT's website www.abt.org.

#4 ABT Fan

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 10:31 AM

While I'm hesitant to say that I'm happy with this announcement (because that sounds snarky and unkind and I wish only the best for Irina), I'm pleased that this means (hopefully) that there will be room for a soloist to be promoted who has labored for too long in that role (because haven't most of them?). Especially, since for whatever reason, Irina hasn't performed much in recent years.

It would have been nice if Irina and Max could have done a retirement gala together - why couldn't they have waited to announce Max's retirement a little so they could have made a joint announcement at least? Max has performed even less frequently than his wife, so perhaps he's injured/out of shape/already "retired" and so a joint retirement gala wouldn't have been possible for him. A Swan Lake farewell would have been appropriate.

In any case, I wonder if they'll do any teaching/coaching at ABT? I've seen them on teacher's rosters elsewhere (of course now I can't remember where).

#5 AG

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 11:26 AM

Perhaps Max could dance Prince Gremin that evening....

#6 abatt

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 11:47 AM

I'm pleased that this means (hopefully) that there will be room for a soloist to be promoted who has labored for too long in that role (because haven't most of them?).


I think the next female soloist who will be promoted from within ABT will be Boylston, but I doubt that will happen in the near future. She is the only female soloist who repeatedly gets numerous star, principal roles. They are testing her out to see if she has the stamina and ability to handle all these important, difficult roles. While I adore Stella, I think the promotion ship has sailed. I don't think Lane, Kajiya or Copeland are realistic candidates. They get a few leading roles here and there, but not the way Boylston does. I like Messmer very much, but she also has not been tested in numerous, grueling principal roles.

Back to Irina, it's ironic that she is leaving now, since she is still a very strong dancer. I think we all anticipated that some other senior lady principal at ABT might retire this season.

#7 angelica

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 12:02 PM

Yes, Abatt. In fact, I can think of two! I fear that you may be right about the promotion ship for Stella, but I keep hoping against hope that Ratmansky, who seems to like her, will be able to have some influence in that regard. She is the most deserving of all the senior soloists.

#8 Natalia

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 04:53 AM

....Back to Irina, it's ironic that she is leaving now, since she is still a very strong dancer. I think we all anticipated that some other senior lady principal at ABT might retire this season.


Time will tell if, perhaps, Irina's retirement might be due to hubby Max possibly taking-on an artistic directorship of a ballet company? In that case, it may make sense that she wants to keep the family together. Denis Matvienko is the AD of the big troupe in Kyiv, so not there.

#9 Nyankeesy01

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 08:21 AM

Pointe Magazine did a little Q&A with Irina - here's a scan of the article from ABT's Facebook page: https://sphotos-a.xx...730188298_n.jpg
I like her response to the last question!

#10 canbelto

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Posted 08 May 2013 - 12:06 PM

There's a nice long interview with Irina which sheds some insight on her retirement:
http://www.timeout.c...e-poisson-rouge

#11 ksk04

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Posted 08 May 2013 - 12:24 PM

Thanks for posting; she always seem like such an interesting person. Very funny.

Yikes:

Irina Dvorovenko: Yes. In Russia, each ballet dancer was attached to a coach, and it was like having a mother in the ballet pretty much. So you need something more personal. Here, you cannot be attached, because everyone is running from one studio to another. So it’s a different structure. I cannot blame it, because the theater functions in this way. But that’s what people want—everyone from the dance world. Gillian [Murphy] arrived from New Zealand, and she went to take class with [ABT], and then we saw her at class at Steps and we said, “Well, how was it?” And she said, “What’s the matter with ABT? Everybody’s so depressed, everybody’s crying. What’s happening?” So it’s not only me. Everybody’s noticing that. Something strange is going on with this bunch of guest artists who take performances from the dancers who work hard. And nobody develops our dancers. The dancers who come from out [of the company], they have been already nourished by somebody and molded so they have experience to share, but our dancers also need this experience and they cannot, because no one is helping them. And also everybody is working so hard in the studios, but the amount of time is so compressed. It’s hard for everyone.



#12 Plisskin

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Posted 08 May 2013 - 06:45 PM

ABT's priorities are out of whack. Instead of spending their money on Guest Artists they should be investing it in the company eg. Hiring more coaches, teachers, developing their talent etc. I had a feeling Irina and Max left because of this. Her comments come as no surprise. She isn't the first ABT dancer (current or former) whom has recently complained about the excessive Guest Stars, lack of development, and working conditions. It's sad.

#13 bingham

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Posted 09 May 2013 - 04:18 AM

ABT's priorities are out of whack. Instead of spending their money on Guest Artists they should be investing it in the company eg. Hiring more coaches, teachers, developing their talent etc. I had a feeling Irina and Max left because of this. Her comments come as no surprise. She isn't the first ABT dancer (current or former) whom has recently complained about the excessive Guest Stars, lack of development, and working conditions. It's sad.


ABT ,more than anything, needs more coaches. This is their chance to get someone familiar with their repertoire.

#14 ABT Fan

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Posted 09 May 2013 - 11:52 AM

Thanks for posting; she always seem like such an interesting person. Very funny.

Yikes:

Irina Dvorovenko: Yes. In Russia, each ballet dancer was attached to a coach, and it was like having a mother in the ballet pretty much. So you need something more personal. Here, you cannot be attached, because everyone is running from one studio to another. So it’s a different structure. I cannot blame it, because the theater functions in this way. But that’s what people want—everyone from the dance world. Gillian [Murphy] arrived from New Zealand, and she went to take class with [ABT], and then we saw her at class at Steps and we said, “Well, how was it?” And she said, “What’s the matter with ABT? Everybody’s so depressed, everybody’s crying. What’s happening?” So it’s not only me. Everybody’s noticing that. Something strange is going on with this bunch of guest artists who take performances from the dancers who work hard. And nobody develops our dancers. The dancers who come from out [of the company], they have been already nourished by somebody and molded so they have experience to share, but our dancers also need this experience and they cannot, because no one is helping them. And also everybody is working so hard in the studios, but the amount of time is so compressed. It’s hard for everyone.


And double yikes:

"Irina Dvorovenko: And when you know that people are helping you, and that they care about you, you have more strength and security in yourself. In the company [ABT], there are a lot of principals and the big problem that the majority of the dancers [face] is that they feel nobody cares about them. They care about the performance and to push them, go, but artists are very sensitive. Every person needs nourishment. You cannot be pushed constantly, constantly, constantly. At 20 years old, they see a psychiatrist three times a week. It’s not normal. We want to be nourished, cared for; even I sometimes see some person down at the ballet who has a role of soloist. I can talk and explain and [say], “Calm down.” You want to be hugged a little bit and feel that somebody cares about you. Then you feel you are important. Just very sensitive moments. The problem is that they throw you somewhere and then ask you to survive, but without help it’s really difficult."

Great interview - thanks for posting! Irina is indeed quite funny throughout her interview. But her candor regarding ABT is not. I'm frankly quite surprised she said the things she did for a publication, and in her specific mentions of a few dancers. Every company has its problems and critics, but the lack of coaching, support and dancer development at ABT is pretty well known by now and as we see here, dancers aren't being quiet anymore. About a year ago, Sascha Radetsky wrote in DanceMagazine about his wife, Stella Abrera: [font='Times New Roman'][size=4]

"She stretched her sciatic nerve a few years ago and had to relinquish her dream role—a well-deserved opportunity that, inexplicably, has not again materialized.

[/size][/font]
" See full article here: http://www.dancemaga...2/Breaking-Free. I believe he was referring to Stella as Giselle.

TimeOut is a pretty well known magazine, so this is not good publicity for ABT. (I don't mean for the general public, who might not be as concerned with her comments, but the dance world.)

I believe ABT has also suffered with Susan Jaffe leaving as ballet mistress due to her new role in North Carolina. I think she still teaches classes there occassionally, but she was coaching the soloist women quite a bit (Sarah Lane, Isabella Boylston). No doubt a great loss to them.

#15 Jayne

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Posted 09 May 2013 - 01:34 PM

Remember that ABT also lost Georgina Parkinson not so long ago. ABT would do very well to hire Irina and Max to do some coaching. However, I think the negative publicity from the articles will preclude that type of job offer. Such a shame.


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