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Sergei Filin Attacked


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#616 bart

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Posted 02 August 2013 - 11:38 AM

Thanks naomikage for the links, especially for the Chicago Tribune article, which is actually from Reuters.

 

I was especially interested in the last paragraph:


Last month, Russia dismissed the long-serving head of the Bolshoi, Anatoly Iksanov, and entrusted Vladimir Urin with rebuilding the theatre's reputation following the scandal.

 

It sounds like a good sign,  when the Powers That Be at the Bolshoi (whoever they are) becomes concerned about what the rest of the world thinks about them..  I hope the article is correct about the motive of "rebuilding reputation."  I also hope that Urin is given the authority to do what's necessary to do what is necessary to rebuild public confidence in the institution.



#617 Helene

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Posted 08 August 2013 - 04:11 PM

The latest, in translation on Ismene Brown's blog:

 

Dmitrichenko: ‘I ask Filin’s pardon, his health is priority now’

 

I think to summarize:

 

1.  He never had any hostility towards Filin

2.  The media distorted his case

3.  His former lawyer, Violetta Volkova, made "unauthorized statements"

4.  He has no plans to discuss financial issues at the Bolshoi, because he was never involved in them [despite being a union representative]

5.  "Also, I never did consider, and I do not consider now, that I had no involvement at all in the Zarutsky attack on Sergei." [which I think means he denies having denied participation?]

6.  He never wanted an examination of Filin to confirm that the injuries are as bad as his Russian and German doctors said.  (That was his [first] lawyer's idea.)

7.  He's willing to pay compensation to Filin.

8.  He has moral responsibility for the attack.

 

Of course, if he had no hostility toward Filin, there would have never been a reason for any attack -- beating or acid -- in the first place, but it's quite a turn-around.  Maybe they'll argue that he can never pay Filin compensation if he's jailed, especially since he's not trained to do much after he gets out of prison and depending on the length of the sentence, he might no longer be able to dance.



#618 Jayne

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Posted 08 August 2013 - 05:06 PM

I believe this is what is called "throwing yourself on the mercy of the court" in the US - trying for contrition in order to get a lesser sentence.  Not sure if it will work in Russia, as I don't really understand the judicial system there (what works or does not work).  But clearly he thinks his first attorney's legal defense was not working out well for him.  

 

I think the best he can hope for is to plead to lesser charges, based on boastful talk that the "hitman" regarded as more sincere than intended.  We haven't seen reports of the presentation of the police evidence.  I am very curious to see what the phone call history really looks like (not just the summaries we've read so far).  They will either be damning or exonerating.  



#619 Alayna

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Posted 08 August 2013 - 05:25 PM

It's very noble of Zarutsky to take full responsibility for the attack on Filin. I'm sure it has nothing to do with him getting a lesser sentence if he's convicted of acting alone instead of being part of a conspiracy. 



#620 Helene

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Posted 08 August 2013 - 07:37 PM

If true, there's still the matter of the colleague who was in the car with Dmitrichenko watching movies until he overheard Dmitrichenko let Zarutsky and accomplice know when Filin left the gala before the attack.



#621 Alayna

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Posted 09 August 2013 - 03:06 AM

There's also news footage of Dmitrichenko showing police how he followed Filin before the attack.  And he had Ruslan Pronin ask Filin where he was going to be the night of the attack. 



#622 volcanohunter

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Posted 10 August 2013 - 05:01 AM

There is actually little new in what Dmitrichenko and Zarutsky had to say. According to information leaked from police interrogations back in March, Dmitrichenko said that he was sorry for what had happened, never authorized the use of acid and was willing to pay Filin compensation. It's in the last paragraph of this story posted on March 8.

http://lifenews.ru/news/111507

 

Zarutsky assumed complete responsibility for the attack from the beginning, which was immediately suspected to be an attempt to get rid of conspiracy charges. This story is from March 12.

http://izvestia.ru/news/546475

 

And because Dmitrichenko had asked Pronin about Filin's whereabouts, Pronin did fall under police scrutiny for a while, but was quickly dropped from the list of possible suspects. I could ask a co-worker where our boss was at the moment, and then, upon finding out from said co-worker that she was out, could go into her office and hack into her computer or steal something from a file cabinet, but that wouldn't mean that the person who provided me with information would have had any idea of what I intended to do with it. 



#623 Alayna

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Posted 10 August 2013 - 06:26 AM

I would have thought that Dmitrichenko asking Pronin about Filin's whereabouts on the night of the attack might have raised some doubts in Pronin's mind about Dmitrichenko's innocence. But I guess not given Pronin's show of support for him after his arrest.

#624 volcanohunter

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Posted 10 August 2013 - 09:40 AM

Not necessarily. As company manager Pronin was Filin's right-hand man. It probably wasn't at all unusual for dancers to ask Pronin about Filin's schedule. I say that as someone who used to be gatekeeper for my boss.

#625 Helene

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Posted 10 August 2013 - 09:52 AM

I think there are several big differences: I haven't seen anything before where Dmitrichenko has been contrite -- he told a judge that he had nothing for which to apologize, since he had not agreed specifically to the acid attack -- and offered to assume financial responsibility for the outcome. (He also claimed earlier to have wanted the entire idea to have been forgotten, but then actively participated in the stakeout, which may have kept him from retribution by Zarutsky, involving a friend without the friend's knowledge of what he was up to, which was cowardly and selfish.) His attitude at any point in time may have been due to his first lawyer's strategy, because I don't see anywhere until now that he blamed her, or it may be his new lawyer's strategy, all of which is to expected when legal teams change. (His original attorney got to add another high-profile client to her list, with the subsequent publicity.) Last he claims never to have had any hostility towards Filin, which is still laughable, considering he involved a thug and killer in a different kind of attack, but I would not be surprised if he believes this, because by also accounts from the dancers who've defended him, that he blows up and all is forgotten.

As far as asking Pronin Filin's whereabouts, there was nothing that would cause Pronin to be suspicious of anything, since it was not unusual for a dancer to need to speak to the AD.

#626 Alayna

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Posted 10 August 2013 - 11:48 AM

I wouldn't have expected Pronin to be suspicious of Dmitrichenko's request to find out where Filin was going to be that night.  But LATER, after the attack and Dmitrichenko's arrest for it, I wonder if the possibility that Dmitrichenko's request for Filin's schedule on that particular night might mean he was involved ever crossed Pronin's mind. 



#627 Helene

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Posted 10 August 2013 - 12:06 PM

If he was one of the many who didn't believe Dmitrichenko had anything to do with it and had a false confession beaten out of him by the police, Pronin would have no reason to believe he was involved, however unknowingly or tangentially. 

 

It's also not as if he had secret information, and he was the only one from whom Dmitrichenko could have gotten it, had Pronin told him "I don't know."



#628 Drew

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Posted 11 August 2013 - 10:59 AM

I think there are several big differences: I haven't seen anything before where Dmitrichenko has been contrite -- he told a judge that he had nothing for which to apologize, since he had not agreed specifically to the acid attack -- and offered to assume financial responsibility for the outcome. (He also claimed earlier to have wanted the entire idea to have been forgotten, but then actively participated in the stakeout, which may have kept him from retribution by Zarutsky, involving a friend without the friend's knowledge of what he was up to, which was cowardly and selfish.) His attitude at any point in time may have been due to his first lawyer's strategy, because I don't see anywhere until now that he blamed her, or it may be his new lawyer's strategy, all of which is to expected when legal teams change. (His original attorney got to add another high-profile client to her list, with the subsequent publicity.) Last he claims never to have had any hostility towards Filin, which is still laughable, considering he involved a thug and killer in a different kind of attack, but I would not be surprised if he believes this, because by also accounts from the dancers who've defended him, that he blows up and all is forgotten.
 

 

 

At the very least Dimitrichenko seems to be getting better advice than he was before; I admit I feel sort of relieved to see this kind of language coming from his 'camp.'

 

(Obviously, at this stage, I don't believe his confession--however obtained--was just some hysterical fiction concocted by police.)



#629 Alayna

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Posted 12 August 2013 - 01:23 PM

Sergei Filin has left the building! (And gone to London.)




http://www.france24....let-tour-report

#630 innopac

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Posted 14 August 2013 - 01:24 PM

I was surprised to read the following --

"But in a society where 30 per cent of Muscovites thought that the acid-in-the-face attack on Sergey Filin ordered by a Bolshoi enemy was a legitimate punishment for a rival" . . . .

 

From:

Opinion: When artists could speak out:  Pressure mounts on Russian musicians who supported Putin campaign to repudiate anti-gay laws

by David Nice, The Arts Desk, 12 August 2013

http://www.theartsde...could-speak-out




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