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Sergei Filin Attacked


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#571 volcanohunter

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Posted 27 May 2013 - 03:22 PM

What's not so nice are statements like this one from press secretary Katerina Novikova:

"In the context of our 237-year history, in two years' time, the acid attack will be a footnote in history but it's still very raw now."

How reassuring it must be to know that your theater regards your plight as a future footnote. What does that make Ms. Novikova?

"Unfortunately, it was a big blow, to the theatre and the country, since the theatre is Russia's calling card to the world. We still can't explain it and we don't know how it will end but the show must go on."


A big blow because it damaged the country's reputation? What about the lives and careers hanging in the balance?


http://www.smh.com.a...l#ixzz2UXPM2VbS



#572 Jayne

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Posted 27 May 2013 - 04:37 PM

No, I think she's correct. The world's attention span is slight, and honestly most stopped paying attention back in February. This will indeed be a footnote in 2 years time in any articles written about the Bolshoi, just as Trotsky's assassination in Mexico is a footnote in Russian history. I don't think she's being trite, I think she's being honest about how dance historians and main stream media will regard the incidents in a few years' time.

#573 Mashinka

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 12:46 AM

ITA with Jayne. It must be around 25 years since Mukhamedov seriously assaulted a female member of the audience inside the theatre, but how many people remember that today?

#574 Buddy

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 01:20 AM

I would think that what Ivan Vasiliev expressed also represents the opinion of many, perhaps most, of the Bolshoi artists as well as most individuals as to why they're in the art form, but this is just my opinion. What I'm trying to say is that it's a love of beauty and the art (and the environment that nurtures and supports it) that supersedes many of the other things that might be happening.

[font=helvetica, arial, sans-serif][size=4](Again, part of the quote: "Personally, I love the Bolshoi theater, it’s our alpha, how I started and part of my soul.”)[/size][/font]

[font=helvetica, arial, sans-serif][size=4][second sentence added later -- and reworded][/size][/font]

#575 Helene

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 08:04 AM

ITA with Jayne. It must be around 25 years since Mukhamedov seriously assaulted a female member of the audience inside the theatre, but how many people remember that today?

I had never heard about this in the first pace. Was it as generally publicized? Remnick wrote a full article about the attack on Filin in "The New Yorker," it was widely publicized in the Western mainstream press, reporting still goes on four months later, the Internet is in full bloom, with discussion boards, search tools, and translators, and a major English-language critic, Ismene Brown, has been following the story diligently providing translation of articles in the Rusian press and keeping readers alert to new ones via Twitter, just to give some examples of the current landscape.

#576 Mashinka

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 08:16 AM


ITA with Jayne. It must be around 25 years since Mukhamedov seriously assaulted a female member of the audience inside the theatre, but how many people remember that today?

I had never heard about this in the first pace. Was it as generally publicized? Remnick wrote a full article about the attack on Filin in "The New Yorker," it was widely publicized in the Western mainstream press, reporting still goes on four months later, the Internet is in full bloom, with discussion boards, search tools, and translators, and a major English-language critic, Ismene Brown, has been following the story diligently providing translation of articles in the Rusian press and keeping readers alert to new ones via Twitter, just to give some examples of the current landscape.


Pre internet so not widely known at the time nor was it reported in the press - the theatre made a good job of suppressing the story. Eventually the UK Bolshoi fans got to hear about it but a long time after the event. There is mention of it in Mukhamedov’s biography but it is glossed over.

#577 Mashinka

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Posted 04 June 2013 - 05:25 AM

The latest from Ismene Brown's coverage of the story

http://www.ismeneb.c...ts_lawyers.html

The important thing here is to get an independent expert to do the examining - not a Russian. The pictures of the original injuries look quite bad but a couple of weeks later when Filin emerges, his skin is remarkably clear.

I'm told by someone who saw them that some (not all) of those infamous pictures of Yanin were photo shopped and it is becoming increasingly likely that the same has happened here. Photographic images are no longer to be trusted.

#578 Helene

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Posted 04 June 2013 - 07:14 AM

There's little basis from this article to conclude that it is "increasingly likely" that photos of Filin are photoshopped: in fact, there's no reference in the article to the defense claiming that photos released of Filin were altered.

The defense has sent the official written given them evidence to their experts, who have by no means proven to be objective, because their identities are being hidden, and they're basing a defense on these experts' conclusion. Of course, this is on the basis of paperwork, not a physical examination of any kind.

The points in the linked articles are:

1. The defense has conflicting claims: Filin was never as injured as claimed or he was injured, but the seriousness of his injuries was caused by an infection he caught in the German hospital, so its really not their fault. I notice here are no claims from he defense that the defendents, including Dmitrichenko, had been set up by the police with false confessions beaten out of them, just that they didn't cause much damage.

2. The defense insists on an examination; they've been told to come to Germany if they want more experts to examine Filin.



#579 Alayna

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Posted 04 June 2013 - 07:48 AM

Those photos of Filin's face accompanied an article that gave a detailed description of how his burns were treated to explain why his skin looked as good as it did when he was released from the hospital in Moscow. But for people who are so determined to believe Filin is faking his injuries I don't think any amount of evidence would ever be enough. If he had appeared right in front of their faces with his burns they would probably still claim the burns weren't real but special effects makeup. As for any further damage his condition suffered from an infection he contracted in the hospital not being his alleged attackers' fault - he wouldn't have been in the hospital in the first place if he hadn't been attacked.

#580 abatt

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Posted 04 June 2013 - 07:53 AM

The defense is obviously going to say anything and do anything to try and bolster their arguments. In my opinion, these preposterous assertions that Filin and his team of doctors are faking it only make the defendants seem even more disgusting.

#581 canbelto

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Posted 04 June 2013 - 07:55 AM

The latest from Ismene Brown's coverage of the story

http://www.ismeneb.c...ts_lawyers.html

The important thing here is to get an independent expert to do the examining - not a Russian. The pictures of the original injuries look quite bad but a couple of weeks later when Filin emerges, his skin is remarkably clear.

I'm told by someone who saw them that some (not all) of those infamous pictures of Yanin were photo shopped and it is becoming increasingly likely that the same has happened here. Photographic images are no longer to be trusted.


Burns take on different "looks." From what I understand Filin was doused in the eyes, not his face. It makes sense actually that his skin looks better than his eyes, which from all accounts are as of now unable to see.

In other news it's disturbing how happy people seem to be that this happened: two wrongs don't make a right. Whatever Filin may or may not have done as AD doesn't justify physical violence.

#582 RUKen

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Posted 04 June 2013 - 07:56 AM

As for any further damage his condition suffered from an infection he contracted in the hospital not being his alleged attackers' fault - he wouldn't have been in the hospital in the first place if he hadn't been attacked.

It should also be considered that people with serious burn injuries are much more susceptible to infections than healthy people.

#583 Helene

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Posted 04 June 2013 - 08:07 AM

As for any further damage his condition suffered from an infection he contracted in the hospital not being his alleged attackers' fault - he wouldn't have been in the hospital in the first place if he hadn't been attacked.

It should also be considered that people with serious burn injuries are much more susceptible to infections than healthy people.

Yes, and infection is the biggest cause of death among severe burn victims. Filin was fully clothed during the attack and wasn't burned over a large surface area, but faces are very susceptible and hospitals are breeding grounds for infection. (Not that he had a choice.)

#584 Mashinka

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Posted 04 June 2013 - 08:15 AM


The latest from Ismene Brown's coverage of the story

http://www.ismeneb.c...ts_lawyers.html

The important thing here is to get an independent expert to do the examining - not a Russian. The pictures of the original injuries look quite bad but a couple of weeks later when Filin emerges, his skin is remarkably clear.

I'm told by someone who saw them that some (not all) of those infamous pictures of Yanin were photo shopped and it is becoming increasingly likely that the same has happened here. Photographic images are no longer to be trusted.


Burns take on different "looks." From what I understand Filin was doused in the eyes, not his face. It makes sense actually that his skin looks better than his eyes, which from all accounts are as of now unable to see.

In other news it's disturbing how happy people seem to be that this happened: two wrongs don't make a right. Whatever Filin may or may not have done as AD doesn't justify physical violence.


Since the initial attack on Filin there have been two high profile attacks on London women, both apprently random that were given a great deal of coverage in the press:

http://www.bbc.co.uk...london-22350772

http://www.huffingto..._n_3263164.html

Neither emerged with a clear face after two weeks. But Filin did

http://www.bing.com/...selectedIndex=7

Is anyone happy? I doubt it, but a lot of people are puzzled.

#585 Helene

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Posted 04 June 2013 - 08:29 AM

The defense is obviously going to say anything and do anything to try and bolster their arguments. In my opinion, these preposterous assertions that Filin and his team of doctors are faking it only make the defendants seem even more disgusting.

It's the defense's job to do what they can to defend their client, and that includes exploiting the current climate in Russia, where beating someone, including to death, is not considered sonething out of the ordinary and where the general public does not believe that anything that happens in the court system or through the police is not a corrupt set-up.


Since the initial attack on Filin there have been two high profile attacks on London women, both apprently random that were given a great deal of coverage in the press:

http://www.bbc.co.uk...london-22350772

http://www.huffingto..._n_3263164.html

Neither emerged with a clear face after two weeks. But Filin did

http://www.bing.com/...selectedIndex=7

Is anyone happy? I doubt it, but a lot of people are puzzled.

These incidents aren't pertinent to Filin's case. Generalizing a situation, particularly a medical one, from a very limited number of superficially related situations isn't meaningful, however ubiquitous.


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