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Sergei Filin Attacked


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#406 elena

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 02:49 PM

Personally I have thought that Dmitrichenko seems like a pawn (not to say he has no fault or guilt) - mainly because of what Filin has said himself in believing there is more behind this, and what was posted above about him perhaps not wanting to return if this is not solved to the end; not to mention the doubts that seem to be bubbling just beneath the surface of those that work there.

Filin has said he doesn't believe Tsiskaridze is involved, so if we eliminate him from the equation, to me it leaves one person that does wield a lot of power, a person that others may fear because of his influence, a person who has those who are very loyal to him - a source of conflict when it comes to leadership within the troupe. However I may be completely misreading and misunderstanding what was posted and if so I will edit this...

It may be my own bias because I have questioned in my own mind why he has barely been brought up, when clearly the power struggles seem to revolve around him in many ways.

#407 volcanohunter

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 03:09 PM

Dmitrichenko may not even know who is pulling the strings. Judging by what he said in court and by what he allegedly said in police custody, each time it was Yuri Zarutsky who offered to inflict violence on Filin. Dmitrichenko complains to Zarutsky about his problems at work, Zarutsky offers to do something about it. Dmitrichenko supposedly said that he rejected outright at least two offers by Zarutsky to kill Filin. (Unless it was said in jest, if someone offered to help me solve my problems by knocking off my boss, I'd subsequently avoid that person like the plague.) In court Dmitrichenko said he did accept Zarutsky's offer to beat Filin. It is possible that someone had paid Zarutsky to goad Dmitrichenko into ordering an attack.

#408 Drew

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 03:36 PM

Dmitrichenko may not even know who is pulling the strings. Judging by what he said in court and by what he allegedly said in police custody, each time it was Yuri Zarutsky who offered to inflict violence on Filin. Dmitrichenko complains to Zarutsky about his problems at work, Zarutsky offers to do something about it. Dmitrichenko supposedly said that he rejected outright at least two offers by Zarutsky to kill Filin. (Unless it was said in jest, if someone offered to help me solve my problems by knocking off my boss, I'd subsequently avoid that person like the plague.) In court Dmitrichenko said he did accept Zarutsky's offer to beat Filin. It is possible that someone had paid Zarutsky to goad Dmitrichenko into ordering an attack.


It's a very generous reading (and assumes Dmitrichenko is not lying about anything)--but he had already hired Zarutsky for help with "muscle" at the Dacha complex (I too will assume he is telling the truth) and, in that context, he then starts telling Zarutsky about problems at work with Filin...In Dmitrichenko's version, as reported at least, this doesn't exactly seem like a kind of quasi-entrapment. I should have thought that if Dmitrichenko's strings were/are being pulled then they were/are being pulled in more direct psychological fashion. Either way, if Dmitrichenko is a pawn (not, I underline, without responsibility) what's depressing is that the Bolshoi is a theater where this kind of plot could even be thinkable let alone succeed--and I think that speaks to exactly the issues Remnick addresses in his article. It would be less depressing if the "plot" were relatively contained with or without Dimitrichenko at the center or it.

What Remnick reports on Filin's eyesight does not sound very positive.

#409 volcanohunter

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 03:53 PM

...what's depressing is that the Bolshoi is a theater where this kind of plot could even be thinkable let alone succeed


That a large number of Bolshoi employees refuse to believe in Dmitrichenko's involvement suggests that for them such a thing is unthinkable.

#410 Drew

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 04:17 PM


...what's depressing is that the Bolshoi is a theater where this kind of plot could even be thinkable let alone succeed


That a large number of Bolshoi employees refuse to believe in Dmitrichenko's involvement suggests that for them such a thing is unthinkable.


Yes, that's true. I guess I would be more cheered up by that fact if some of the ones quoted didn't also seem to think it was entirely thinkable that Dmitrichenko would hack Filin's email and have Filin's tires slashed...

#411 Natalia

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 05:12 PM

......to me it leaves one person that does wield a lot of power, a person that others may fear because of his influence, a person who has those who are very loyal to him - a source of conflict when it comes to leadership within the troupe. .....


Yes, the person for whom a very important ballet competition in Sochi is named (which he happens to chair), whose top winners rise up fairly quickly through the Bolshoi ranks, after winning said competition. The person who casts his ballets, which happen to constitute at least 50% of the repertoire of full-evening-length works. Of course, we cannot actually name him because we're all scarred stiff that our friends, family, former students, etc. now employed by the company may be hurt, so he remains "Mr. X."

#412 elena

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 06:02 PM


......to me it leaves one person that does wield a lot of power, a person that others may fear because of his influence, a person who has those who are very loyal to him - a source of conflict when it comes to leadership within the troupe. .....


Yes, the person for whom a very important ballet competition in Sochi is named (which he happens to chair), whose top winners rise up fairly quickly through the Bolshoi ranks, after winning said competition. The person who casts his ballets, which happen to constitute at least 50% of the repertoire of full-evening-length works. Of course, we cannot actually name him because we're all scarred stiff that our friends, family, former students, etc. now employed by the company may be hurt, so he remains "Mr. X."



Indeed.

I can't say whether he was or wasn't involved of course, but I can't say I haven't wondered about the fact he seems to be a common denominator in a lot of this. (Also, combined with what FIlin has said about there being more behind this). Perhaps I am being unfair in my assessment, time may tell.

#413 Drew

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 06:34 PM

That Grigorovich continues to be an "issue" for the Bolshoi, sure--it's obvious; that his presence is behind a great deal of the factionalism and general ugliness of Bolshoi politics--yes, that too. That what Iksanov said of Tsiskaridze could probably just as well be said of Grigorivich--well, I could easily believe it.

The rest? Not so obvious and not even so easy to believe. Bluntly: Why would Grigorovich be interested in going after Filin in so much more vicious a way than he (or anyone else) has gone after any of Filin's predecessors -- many of whom arguably posed a bigger threat to the Grigorovich legacy than Filin did (e.g. Ratmansky and Burlaka whose work as choreographers and stagers of classics was in more obvious competition with that legacy)?

I'm not saying there isn't an answer to that question, just that it is far from being something one can make out "between the lines" and insinuating Grigorovich's involvement in this crime seems to me very problematic without more to go on than the fact a member of his "faction" has confessed. Indeed given Grigorovich's continued hold on the company it hardly seems necessary for him to have taken such extreme actions--if he is so very feared, then he obviously has less over-the-top ways to exercise his influence--unless indeed we are supposed to think that looming mortality has wrecked his judgment.

It just seems to me that without something more than general paranoia to go on, it's too big a leap ....

#414 Jayne

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 06:45 PM

there was evidence having to do with cell phone purchases, usage etc.: the kind of evidence that police departments all over the world use all the time. It's also not irrelevant in determining to what degree he is being "victimized" and to what degree he should shoulder his own share of responsibility however secondary. (Put a little differently: a pawn in this situation is not quite the same as a victim.)

That said, it's obviously crucial for the future of the theater that all the persons involved, especially those most powerful who are "behind" this crime, be exposed and, one hopes, tried for their crimes. I confess, though, that the answer is not obvious to me. I would be curious what you are thinking and why.

If the mastermind is an older person, will they be able to track back to this person using technology? I ask because many times older people are not using email, facebook or cell phones at all. I think Mr Dmitrichenko will be 'leaned' on heavily to reveal the mastermind.

That said, it's also possible that there was no further mastermind beyond Mr Dmitrichenko. The refrain "I can't believe he'd do such a thing" is pretty common after crimes as well. Sometimes people have dark sides (just read the confession section of Reddit to slip down the rabbit hole of bizarre behavior).

#415 Mashinka

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 02:00 AM

How old is Grigorovich now? 86? and slowing down from what I've heard. As Filin allowed him to oversee his productions, wildly popular with the Russian public in spite of what westerners think, I don't actually see a motive.

Filin himself thinks there is more than just fall-guy Pavel D. involved in this so there may yet be more revelations to come.

#416 canbelto

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 02:54 AM

My theory:

This person has had a long history of antagonizing Bolshoi management. But in this case, he is aging, and Filin has staged his works but also made it clear he wants to aggressively expand the Bolshoi repertoire. For this person, it's about knowing which buttons to push (in tis case, seeking out a disgruntled dancer) and letting the rest play itself out.

#417 Alayna

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 08:22 AM

Iksanov is now saying that if Dmitrichenko is acquitted he will be able to keep his job at the Bolshoi. He also says that he believes Dmitrichenko when he says that he "only" intended for Filin to be beaten up. So if a judge believes that as well, does that mean Dmitrichenko will be acquitted? I don't care if Dmitrichenko is a pawn or not, he was the one who set the attack in motion. He's still guilty and deserves a harsh sentence. I find it very disturbing that the director of the Bolshoi is willing to keep someone like him on the payroll - a man who thought it okay to use violence as a way to deal with his disgruntlement with his artistic director. A man who has shown no remorse or regret or taken any responsibility for the immense suffering that has been inflicted on Filin because of his own involvement in this crime. Why isn't this enough to get him fired? Imagine you're Sergei Filin, finally coming back to work after months of surgeries and treatments, only to have to continue working with the man who paid an ex-con to have you beaten up.

#418 Mme. Hermine

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 08:41 AM

Not sure if this rather lengthy report has anything new to add:



#419 Mme. Hermine

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 09:07 AM

http://ruvr.co.uk/20...t-Filin-attack/

In the latest twist to the story, one of the men charged with an acid attack on the theatre’s artistic director claimed today that a dancer also arrested for the attack is innocent.

Yury Zarutsky, who is charged with carrying out the attack, said that the dancer accused of organising the assault, Pavel Dmitrichenko, knew nothing of his plans to use acid.

Zarutsky said the dancer had expressed a desire to have Sergei Filin beaten up, but that was all. He admitted it was his idea to ‘spoil Filin’s face,’ and that he was not paid any money for this.

The trial for all three suspects in the case is expected to start in April.



#420 volcanohunter

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 10:16 AM

This is a translation of an open letter by employees of the Bolshoi Theater demanding a fair investigation and trial of Pavel Dmitrichenko. It is said to have been signed by more than 300 employees. It's my own translation, so I apologize in advance for its imperfections.

To the President of the Russian Federation
To the Government of the Russian Federation
To the Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Bolshoi Theatre of Russia A.D. Zhukov
To members of the media
To admirers of ballet and theater in Russia and abroad
To the theater community


An Open Letter


The creative and administrative teams of the Bolshoi Theatre of Russia consider it their duty to express their position on the tragic situation of the attack on the artistic director of the ballet S. Yu. Filin and the accusation of committing the crime made against ballet soloist P. Dmitrichenko.

In recent weeks and days in connection with the situation at the Bolshoi Theater, numerous statements in the media have been made discrediting the reputation of the theater, with more than two hundred years of history behind it, and those who work in it. We think the time has come for the people who have worked directly and continue to work with two outstanding artists, who meet daily with them in rehearsals and performances, and who have long-standing creative and friendly ties with them, to speak. The matter concerns the fate of two men, whose formation and career are inextricably linked with the walls of the Bolshoi; for the colleagues of Sergei Filin and Pavel Dmitrichenko to state their civic and moral position is important and fundamental.

For all those who know Pavel Dmitrichenko, even the notion that he could be inspiration and instigator of a crime committed so brutally is absurd. Knowing Pavel personally for many years, we are certain that despite the known features of his personality–vivid temperament, brusqueness and directness–he is a deeply decent man, responsive and always willing to lend a hand. His active work in the community organizations of the Bolshoi Theater is the most eloquent proof of this, and his creative achievements are also evident and cannot be doubted. It is our firm conviction that fundamental differences with Sergei Filin about his artistic and personnel policy could not go outside the bounds of the law. The conclusions of the investigation seem to us premature, the evidence – inconclusive, and the confession of Pavel himself, later changed, to be the result of brutal pressure.

Unfortunately, the history of our country and our society knows many examples where results "needed" by investigators were achieved by unfair and sometimes illegal methods, and the evidence and proof often proved to be fictitious.

We ask for a fair and impartial investigation into the tragedy that occurred to Sergei Filin, a scrupulous examination of all the circumstances and possible motives for the crime, and that all legal and judicial norms be maintained. It is not just the fate of well-known artists that are at stake, but ultimately the reputation of one of the best theaters in the world and Russian culture in general, and any verdict in this case will play a fateful role for the country.

The pitting of two artists—the artistic director and a leading soloist of the Bolshoi Ballet—against each other is in itself flawed, since until a verdict against Pavel Dmitrichenko is reached, the presumption of innocence stands; the hasty conclusions of some media, who describe him as a criminal, violates not only legal, but also moral and ethical standards.

Our support for Pavel Dmitrichenko is not a sign of indifference toward Sergei Filin, who is living through the most difficult period in his life; we wish him a speedy recovery. We hope that the real causes and circumstances of the crime will be established, and that the opinion of the staff of the Bolshoi Theatre, where the tragedy occurred, will help the public to see the situation in a much more objective light, without a media prone to sensationalism and possible pressure from judicial and executive authorities who want to put a quick end to this matter.

We appeal to the government to set up an independent commission to determine the causes that led to this tragedy.

http://www.mk.ru/cul...itrichenko.html


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