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Program II


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#16 Buddy

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 05:19 PM

Glad to read your enthusiastic reviews, bart and Birdsall.

Bart, I'm also very glad to hear Patricia Delgado and Leigh-Ann Esty's names favorably mentioned as their sisters (Jeanette Delgado and Sara Esty) tend to get a great deal of the attention. I've always liked Patricia Delgado for her refined manner and Leigh-Ann Esty remains, lovingly, one of the twins that often knocked me over as the speed of light team in such works as Twyla Tharp's "In The Upper Room" and "Night Spot."

#17 cubanmiamiboy

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 11:13 AM

.

Don Q Pas de Deux. Jeanette Delgado replaced Mary Carmen Catoya on Sunday matinee, dancing with Reyneris Reyes. She has the fire needed for therole, but I was pleasantly surprised by the warmth, plush port de bras, and rather "romantic" approach to the adagio. She had a problem with one of the big balances, but made it up by sustaining the last balance. Just about everything was rock solid, including the fouettes (with doubles and at least one set of triples). A group of students from the Harid Conservatory were in the audience. Their cheers at curtain calls showed how excited and impressed they were. The older folk in the audience, while not so vocal, seemed similarly uplifted.


One little nice accent. Delgado-(whom was the only one i saw in the DQPDD)-didn't used the Russian version of the variation with the gaziillion passes, neither the sequence-(which I believed was used by all the dancers during the full lenght production)-of pirouettes during the final diagonal, but instead danced the whole variation as it's staged by Alonso in Cuba, which she also imported from her NY days, with the jetes at first and the final diagonal of little pas de cheval while fanning herself.

#18 bart

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 11:57 AM

One little nice accent. Delgado-(whom was the only one i saw in the DQPDD)-didn't used the Russian version of the variation with the gaziillion passes, neither the sequence-(which I believed was used by all the dancers during the full lenght production)-of pirouettes during the final diagonal, but instead danced the whole variation as it's staged by Alonso in Cuba, which she also imported from her NY days, with the jetes at first and the final diagonal of little pas de cheval while fanning herself.

That's fascinating. Sounds like she may have been working with Cuban-trained coaches?. I knew there was something different in this performance, certainly as compared to Catoya's the evening before. But -- not knowing the steps as well as you -- I focused not on steps but on style. One thing I did notice were several grands battements, with the leg ascending explosively but descending more slowly, almost gently. Very lovely. There seemed to be a number of these touches, especially with the relatively soft port de bras.

Cristian, maybe you can answer a question I have about Reyneris Reyes' variation. At one point he did multiple, non-travelling tours en l'air -- to the right, then to the left, then right again, then left again. This struck me as being unfamiliar.

#19 Birdsall

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 10:18 AM

I could be wrong, but I think dancers in general love to dance new works. They want to feel like creators instead of always dancing roles that others have danced so well in the past and they are up against a major yardstick (being compared to all the greats). Don't get me wrong.... I think they also enjoy the challenge of dancing a famous role danced by all the greats also, but I actually think we fans actually enjoy that more. I think actual artists always want to do something new that almost feels like their own, and when you have a choreographer creating specifically for you, I bet you feel special and you wonder if the ballet will survive the test of time and you will be in history books as the first to have danced it, for example.

I think we audience members are obsessive and want to see the same things over and over. At least I know I do. I could watch Raymonda or Sleeping Beauty over and over and never tire of them. I am the same way about opera (Bellini's Norma or Wagner's Ring). There are certain works I know and love so much that I want to see them whenever a new person performs the work.

But I suspect dancers are the opposite of me. They long and crave to dance new ballets tailored for them. I bet it is very exciting.

Euphotic was interesting, and I wouldn't mind seeing it again, but I am not sure it is better than most Balanchine, and I am not certain it really breaks much new ground. But it looked like it was probably exciting and fun for the dancers. The dancers have a totally different view of the work than an audience member. They "feel" the dance. We "see" it. So what may look "decent" or "nice" to us might actually feel "exciting and thrilling" to them. Who knows?

#20 Helene

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 10:40 AM

A discussion of Macaulay's review of Miami City Ballet can be found here:

http://balletalert.i...et/#entry314290

#21 Buddy

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 12:03 PM

Birdsall, I tend to agree with your general point of view and it's certainly worth thinking about.

I personally liked Liam Scarlett's first work here, “Viscera,” very much and would have loved to have seen this one.

I'm also one who enjoyed the debut of Twyla Tharp's "Night Spot" very much. I thought that the dancers showed an excitement and proficiency that was different from their norm and worthy of some of the finest references to Broadway. They burned up the stage, hopefully had a lot of fun doing it and were darn good.

On the other hand, I hope that they keep their Balanchine rep as alive and well as is possible because they are great at it.


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