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Mariinsky Live 3D Cine-cast of Swan Lake, June 6Rescheduled from Feb. 14


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#106 Natalia

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Posted 08 June 2013 - 06:10 AM

Thanks, chiapuris. Between your report and those of others on another thread, I don't feel so bad about having missed it due to prior commitments. The technical bloopers and poor filming are particularly puzzling given that Russia has such a fine cinematic history, e.g., the Land of Sergei Eisenstein, Bondarchuk's War and Peace, Mosfilm, etc.

Kondaurova deserved better.

#107 Amy Reusch

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 09:24 PM

This clip made its way to youtube... At least Vodianova's dress was easy on the eyes...



#108 Amy Reusch

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 09:30 PM

This clip as well... The video could have been much worse than this. It's not wonderful but we've all seen much worse, unfortunately.



#109 Amy Reusch

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 09:48 PM

The pas de trois is lovely!


#110 Tiara

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 02:29 AM

The pas de trois is lovely!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pp43iDQkfhU&feature=youtube_gdata_player

Agree! Lovely style from all three. Xander Parish has good jumps and elegant presence - looking more and more promising, and Nadia Batoeva's turns in particular are just a joy to see!

#111 Drew

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 04:46 AM

This clip made its way to youtube... At least Vodianova's dress was easy on the eyes...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7hYYfDmQUOs&feature=youtube_gdata_player


I was actually sitting in the box next to the one in which the interviews were conducted--not the one you see in background but the one on the other side. The people immediately next to the interview box had to wait to sit down until the end of intermission so it was a bit of musical chairs for a few minutes and, since the boxes are already overcrowded, it was quite a crush as we all stood waiting to get into our proper seats. However, it was fun to be right next to the filming and especially enjoyable to see the artists that close up (and likewise Gergiev during the next intermission). Now that my stage door days are over I almost never see them that way.

During the interviews we could only hear Vodianova not the artists being interviewed. I think she looked quite a bit prettier in real life, as indeed did her dress as well. I can see here that the interviews were fairly lame, especially for a balletomane, but as best I could tell everyone in our box (a mix of Americans and Russians) seemed to find it somewhat exciting to be right next to the filming and we all applauded Vodianova as she left her box and she gave us a charming smile. So...uh...I had a great time with it.

#112 Birdsall

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 06:05 AM

You will have a really cool memory of that performance, Drew!!!!

#113 Amy Reusch

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 07:01 AM

I wonder if it wasn't a practice run for the what they might do for the Olympics. Not sure why they all were having trouble. Was it because they were speaking in English and had memorized their lines and were trying to work off teleprompters? She seemed to have cards in her lap but in the interview before the show they seemed to following something near the camera, perhaps above it. I want to say it wasn't a teleprompter because of the strange pauses in the middle of the sentences, unless the operator wasn't very practiced... As if the prompter operator didn't know enough English to follow along and was waiting to hear that finishing pause before feeding them the next line.

I can't seem to access the Black Swan odd footage anymore, It seemed as if there was a crane shot that was very beautiful and I wished they had used more of these. Other shots were not bad, but seemed a little too wide and thereby losing some strength. There were some poor timing choices for cutting wide, diminishing the height of lifts or the energy of the moment. I feel like they had planned to use more crane shots but were warned off of it, but I have no idea really what was happening. It is just that they seemed to have someone beautifully sensitive to framing on a camera not used very often.

But still, faming could have been like this... (though I am still hoping something was off with the transfer to youtube and that they didn't really cut off the dancer's head. )


#114 volcanohunter

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 09:05 AM

I wish they would use the production team that does Britain's Royal Ballet productions as these seem generally well thought out and sensitively shot, but perhaps there are diplomatic issues that would block this?


To answer your question and mine, the film was directed by Ross MacGibbon, who has oodles of experience shooting the Royal Ballet, and he had an English crew. http://londondance.c...3d-live-screen/ So my best guess is that the crane made him temporarily take leave of his senses. At one point, I think at the beginning of the csardas, he even had his "boom mic in the shot" moment where the moving crane was visible at the top of the frame.

#115 Amy Reusch

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 09:26 AM

Good lord! I wonder if communications were on the fritz. Something seemed to be putting everyone off their game.

Somewhere in the Ballet Videos etc. forum, perhaps we should put up a list of current dance movie directors and their credits. It might be enlightening to see. There is such an art to presenting ballet on screen. Some do it so very well. I sometimes strongly encourage people to come to the Ballet in Cinema screenings because in my locale this is the only chance they will have to see some of the great productions... but I was burned on the Osipova-Saravanov Giselle and now really hesitate to talk the films up. On the other hand, I regretted not getting everyone out to see the Coppelia. Hard to know in advance, but a list of credits could be a helpful predictor.

Look... Ross MacGibbon even directed a 1996 Mariinsky Swan Lake: http://www.fandango....ography/p278672. And in the article you linked, he says "It will be the sixth production of Swan Lake that I will have directed and I love filming it each and every time.".

I don't know if this is the same production but the same dancers are listed. I don't know.. Ideally, I would have had the camera on the fouettés gradually come in closer and keep her dead center even if she started to drift, but there aren't major gaffes. I wonder if he had the same crew, even if it were an English crew. Is there somewhere to see the full credits? (apologies if I'm not hunting them down effectively). Here's a list of dancer credits, but no camera credits. http://www.mariinsky...et-portrait.pdf Speaking of which, no one has said anything about John Hurt's narration... did it not happen?

#116 sandik

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 10:07 AM

Amy, I like your idea about a credits page, but I wish it would be extended to all genres of dance on film -- I was writing about music videos earlier in the year, and had a miserable time trying to track down simple information (choreographer, performers, director) about some very main stream videos. I know this is a tangential query, but if anyone here knows where I should be looking for those kind of credits, please let me know.

Now, back to the main topic.

#117 b1

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 12:46 PM

I agree with all the previous posts, but I as most surprised at the bobbles between Kondaurova and Askerov. Nerves? Not sure what happened there. I much more enjoyed her as Odile. She was wonderful there.

I was not impressed with the hostess/narrator. Blech. I also found it VERY long. I understand that this is a 'live' performance, but when it is taped live, cut out the intermissions. We just stood around the movie theater (which was sadly almost empty) waiting, and then waited longer through the 'interviews'.

This is the second ballet movie I have taken my students to and I find the intermissions too long for them. They would do better with the 'electricity' of a full audience during the intermissions, but this was ploddingly long.

#118 Helene

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 12:53 PM

I may be wrong about this, but I don't think they edit the live stream when they broadcast with a tape delay. That's been my experience with the Met in HD "Encores." These are generally edited when they are later shown on PBS, with most, if not all of the interviews at the end or cut.

#119 Helene

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 12:53 PM

I may be wrong about this, but I don't think they edit the live stream when they broadcast with a tape delay. That's been my experience with the Bolshoi "live" ballets -- we're on tape delay in Pacific Time -- and the Met in HD "Encores." The latter are generally edited when they are later shown on PBS, with most, if not all of the interviews at the end or cut.

#120 abatt

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 01:16 PM

The length of these intermissions reminded me of a documentary I saw called Bringing Back Balanchine, relating to NYCB's visit to the Mariinsky Theater a few years ago. During that visit, Gergiev conducted the orchestra, and the intermission was extremely long. I recall Peter Martins making some kind of joke about the fact that he would love to have Gergiev conduct at a NYCB performance in NY, but the intermissions at NYCB are only 20 minutes. So it appears that interminable intermissions are part of the Gergiev modus operandi.


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