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Saturday, November 3


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#1 dirac

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Posted 03 November 2012 - 09:03 PM

Angelo Civic Ballet photo gallery.

#2 dirac

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Posted 03 November 2012 - 09:05 PM

A review of Alberta Ballet in 'Othello' by Salena Kitteringham in The Edmonton Journal.

The Iago and Othello duets were particularly strong with good chemistry between the two male dancers. Bourzac executed here with far more power. There’s no doubt he has what it takes to dance a compelling Othello – one gets the sense if the production ran a few more performances it would give him time and space to fill out his characterization. Bourzac is a rising dancer to watch for.



#3 dirac

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Posted 03 November 2012 - 09:11 PM

Vincent Chaillet talks about going on pointe for Marie-Agnès Gillot’s new ballet.


Despite the difficulties and pain, Mr. Chaillet said that the experience had been both enjoyable and valuable to him as a dancer and as a partner.

“It has pushed me to be technically more precise and more refined,” he said. “I also understand much better now why sometimes your partner will ask you to move just a centimeter or two, or adjust your grip very slightly. Before, I might have thought to myself, come on! But now I realize that you are balancing on this tiny area, and every subtle shift in weight is vital.”



#4 dirac

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Posted 03 November 2012 - 09:15 PM

An exhibit of paintings of Carolina Ballet opens.

The idea grew out of Kennedy’s friendship with the ballet’s artistic director, Robert Weiss, who opened up the group’s studio for the project.

“In the course of a year, I intermittently went to the studio or the stage to photograph with my own camera and experience the process of the ballet being choreographed, which created a far more interesting connection for me as a painter to be a witness,” she said.



#5 dirac

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Posted 03 November 2012 - 09:18 PM

The Boston International Ballet Competition changes its name and venue.

It appears, however, that there wasn’t enough interest. In late October, Kozlova announced that the contest, following “two successful editions in Boston,” is now called the Valentina Kozlova International Ballet Competition. And it is, as its website trumpeted, “relocating to New York City, the dance capital of the world!” Next year’s competition, Kozlova said in a press release, “will be held at the end of June, in the Lincoln Center area, where New York City Ballet and American Ballet Theatre have their homes.”

Over the past couple of decades, people have lamented that Boston is no longer a tryout town. Apparently in this case it was.



#6 dirac

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Posted 03 November 2012 - 09:20 PM

A review of Ballet West by Kathy Adams in The Salt Lake Tribune.

The premiere work on the program is Caniparoli’s "The Lottery," a ballet narrative that bridges the gap between a full-length story ballet and contemporary works that typically have themes but no plot. It’s tempting to make comparisons stylistically to Jerome Robbins’ "West Side Story" or mention new efforts by such luminaries as Twyla Tharp and her full-length story ballet, "The Princess and the Goblin," this year for The Atlanta Ballet. But "The Lottery" is different from those in that it develops the range of emotions, follows the plot, and has a distinct ending respecting the literary elements of theater and storytelling. It also fulfills dance-lovers’ desire to see good, creative, well-crafted choreography....



#7 dirac

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Posted 03 November 2012 - 09:23 PM

Carlos Acosta's project to refurbish an abandoned ballet school causes some controversy in Cuba.

Enter Acosta, who enlisted British architect Norman Foster to help raise money from private donors for the project. A benefit last month yielded some $320,000 in pledges and enough promising leads that Acosta's people feel confident they can hit their $10 million target.

But the involvement of Foster, whose renown and ties to the global financial world are a huge boon for fundraising, has alarmed some people who fear Garatti's original design could be overwhelmed. Foster is famous for his expressive glass-and-steel re-imaginings of historic structures like the dome of Berlin's parliament building and the courtyard of the British Museum.



#8 dirac

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Posted 03 November 2012 - 09:26 PM

Reviews of Pacific Northwest Ballet

The Seattle Times

There's a sort of stern caprice to the early work of German composer Paul Hindemith. And that paradoxical quality is what Mark Morris zeros in on in his new dance piece.

"Kammermusik No. 3," set to a Hindemith cello concerto of the same name, had its world premiere at Pacific Northwest Ballet on Friday (along with three new pieces by PNB dancer-choreographers) and it's an intricate, shadowy dovetailing of movement and music.


The SunBreak

Kiyon Gaines gives his dancers all the leaping anyone could want in Sum Stravinsky, an altogether accomplished work that takes as its inspiration the choreography, says Gaines in his notes, of Balanchine and Stowell. This is a popular line to take with a PNB crowd, but the proof is there onstage. Everything is bright “Balanchine blue” or shades thereof, Pauline Smith’s trim, perky costumes updating the tutu’d look. Gaines, a PNB dancer himself, has placed his colleagues duos like jewels in dance settings perfectly suited to them: Carrie Imler and Jonathan Poretta, Maria Chapman and Karel Cruz, Lesley Rausch and Batkhurel Bold.



#9 dirac

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Posted 05 November 2012 - 02:06 PM

A review of Birmingham Royal Ballet by Judith Cruickshank for danceviewtimes.

No doubts though about the final work on the programme; Frederick Ashton’s The Dream and congratulations must go to whoever rehearsed it. All too often dancers are unable to resist the temptation to embellish the comedy, which generally means it’s less funny. Here Ashton’s intentions were allowed to shine through clearly and the humour was subtle rather than coarse. Special mention should go to Brandon Lawrence as a faintly pompous Lysander, Feargus Campell as a peppery Demitrius and especially, Jonathan Caguioa; a sweetly rustic Bottom.




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