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Tuesday, October 23


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#1 dirac

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Posted 23 October 2012 - 11:21 AM

A review of American Ballet Theatre by Jocelyn Noveck for AP (via The Huffington Post).

The cast reviewed here featured the undeniably handsome couple of Roberto Bolle, with his matinee-idol looks, and the striking Veronika Part, a wonderfully theatrical dancer. You could often hear Part gasping or breathing hard as she experienced the fear and sense of danger the work demanded of her.

It begins in fiercely quick fashion, with strenuous and muscular dancing, only to slow a bit for a dramatic pas de deux (on Saturday, for Bolle and Part.) The athletic fireworks come back with a part for one virtuoso male dancer – on Saturday, Jared Matthews, and on the first night the wonderful Herman Cornejo.



#2 dirac

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Posted 23 October 2012 - 11:32 AM

An interview with Justin Peck by Gretchen Schmid in The Columbia Daily Spectator.

Peck, who was briefly a part-time student at GS a few years ago, said he took advantage of the professional dancers who were just then forming the Columbia Ballet Collaborative, a campus ballet company, to explore the world of choreography. “It was a big learning experience for me because you can’t really study to be a choreographer,” Peck said. “You just have to try it. It was about figuring out if I was interested, and then also what sort of choreographer I wanted to be and what I wanted to accomplish through movement.”



#3 dirac

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Posted 24 October 2012 - 05:00 PM

A preview of Washington Ballet in "Dracula" by Rebecca Ritzel in The Washington Post.

The secret, Pink said, speaking from Wisconsin recently, was to remain faithful to the novel. “We knew from the very beginning [that we had to] maintain the integrity of the book. . . . It has captured the imagination of generation after generation. We wanted to stay with it, otherwise we would veer off into the silliness of B movies, with fangs and heaving breasts.”

Pink wanted his “Dracula” to be serious theater. There are other vampire-themed ballets floating around, slinking onto stages each October. Some feature a corps of scantily clad vampire brides. Pink is fond of Mark Godden’s version for the Royal Winnipeg Ballet but thinks the others are rather schlocky.



#4 dirac

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Posted 24 October 2012 - 05:01 PM

A review of American Ballet Theatre by Robert Greskovic in The Wall Street Journal.

Shostakovich's Symphony No. 9, completed in 1945 and the shortest of his 15 symphonies, is the capstone of what have become known as his three "war" symphonies, Nos. 7, 8 and 9. Official reaction toward Shostakovich's Ninth was mainly negative, finding it a frivolous attempt to mark the Soviet Union's defeat of fascism. Mr. Ratmansky's reading for ABT's dancers, with the women sporting the braided hairstyles favored in Russia, takes to both the music's ebullient energy and its subdominant, dark-toned aspects without reservation.



#5 dirac

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Posted 24 October 2012 - 05:04 PM

A review of Miami City Ballet by Raul Vidal for VOXXI.

The third ballet of the night was Piazzola Caldera, choreographed by Paul Taylor, music by Astor Piazzola and Jerry Peterburshsky. This ballet describes the predatory dance that originated in the brothels of Buenos Aires at the turn of the 20th Century. The music of Tango with Spanish, Italian, Indian, African and Jewish influences was taken to new heights by Astor Piazzola. Without a single Tango step, Paul Taylor captures the essence of Tango Culture. Miami City Ballet was the first dance company outside of the Paul Taylor Dance Company to be licensed to perform the work. All three ballets were executed with the precision and elegance that the company has become famous for.




#6 dirac

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Posted 24 October 2012 - 05:11 PM

A review of New York City Ballet MOVES by Rob Hubbard for The Pioneer Press.

That's when the company opened a two-night stand at Minneapolis' Orpheum Theatre -- and this year's Northrop Dance Season -- with a program firmly rooted in its history, yet keeping one en pointe foot in the classical tradition and the other in modern dance. The touring troupe of 16 dancers (called New York City Ballet Moves) featured several of the company's soloists and principals. And they collaborated on an exquisitely executed program that gave a strong sense of the company's legacy and current cultural identity.



#7 dirac

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Posted 24 October 2012 - 05:21 PM

A review of American Ballet Theatre by Robert Gottlieb in The New York Observer.

The company managed to cram six ballets into its seven performances, most of them worth looking at and a few of them exceptional. I myself had no need to see, ever again, Agnes de Mille’s Rodeo, which premiered in 1942 and which I was taken to see a few years later. It was this ballet that won de Mille the chance to take on Oklahoma!,and it was an A.B.T. calling card for decades, trotted out when management felt it’d better pay a little homage to the very difficult Aggie. Also, it’s fun. But you don’t want to be exposed to its cutenesses very often.



#8 dirac

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Posted 25 October 2012 - 02:46 PM

A review of American Ballet Theatre by Deborah Jowitt in her blog, "DanceBeat."

Ratmansky is brilliant at producing complexity and taming it down just when your eyes need a rest. A skitter of activity in the background, a passing through of some dancers, a foreground spectacle—these resolve into tidy unison before they explode again into orderly dishevelment. The beginning of Symphony #9 is playful. Six men take turns helping each other jump. Craig Salstein races onstage, launches himself into the air, and, whup! he’s reclining on a raft of guys’ arms, eyeing us saucily. The women join, prancing and flying in sideways leaps. Simone Messmer, her boyish haircut not concealed as usual, is their leader. Who has the fastest feet? She and Salstein are made for each other. I’ve always loved his ease onstage and the way he seems able to shrug himself into any style and look as if he owned it. Ratmansky must feel the same way.




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