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Skorik


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#241 cubanmiamiboy

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Posted 31 December 2012 - 04:27 PM

For some reason I've always though of ABT as the most exciting company to look at. Being such a melting pot of schooling and stars, it has always had in rooster dancers that will always please you. Now Vasiliev, Osipova, Part, Semionova and Gomes are keeping the game that Markova, Alonso, Youskevitch, Misha, Naggy, Bujones, Kirkland , Makarova and many others initiated. As I always say...you lucky New Yorkers...

#242 Drew

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Posted 31 December 2012 - 04:31 PM

Leonid: I would dispute the term "higher" as applied to the aesthetic of the Mariinsky versus that of New York City Ballet...and do so not on relativist grounds...but perfectly traditional, even conservative, aesthetic ones. I consider the great Balanchine modernist works to be as "high" as it gets in the dance art and ditto for his distillations of classical dance in Theme and Variations or Serenade or Concerto Barocco. And I think these works are at their greatest when danced with the qualities that Balanchine cultivated in his company.

I'm delighted the Mariinsky dances Balanchine and have no problem with the Balanchine Trust's letting them do so. I dispute that the case for the Mariinsky as the world's best company can be made on the basis of the way they dance it. And however much one may like the way they dance it, I also think it's dubious to claim that they dance it better than NYCB. I would go further and say that the "different" way they dance it, often misses (or messes) crucial aspects of the work. I spelled out some of my reasons in my earlier post and won't repeat them.

I think of myself as rather a strong defender of the Mariinsky. The first ballet I ever saw was a film of Sizova and Soloviev in Sleeping Beauty. I was smitten and those dancers hold a privileged place in my life and being. But one can think highly of the Mariinsky of the 60's and even of the Mariinsky of today without thinking that the way the company currently dances Balanchine captures all (or most) of the key elements of his work. From what I've seen it doesn't.

#243 angelica

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Posted 31 December 2012 - 04:34 PM

Regarding


It used to be said, in the 60s and 70s if I remember correctly, that if you took only the corps de ballet of the Kirov (now Mariinsky), you would have the best ballet company in the world.


I never heard that said anywhere in Europe. The superiority of the Kirov in terms principal dancers in the 60's and 70's has not been equalled since those decades.

Find me the equal of Alla Sizova, Alla Osipenko, Irina Kolpakhova (generally considered among the greatest classicist of the 20th century) that alone Gabriella Komleva, Inna Zubkovskaya, and Xenia Ter-Stepanova.

Find me a more stylish prince than Vladilen Semyenov, or more perfectly trained dancer than Yuri Soloviev and what about the character dancers of that era etc.etc.


That's exactly the point. What people were saying in the 60s and 70s, at least here, perhaps not in Europe, was that however magnificent were the principal dancers at the Kirov, the corps de ballet was also absolutely astonishing.

#244 Quiggin

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 03:38 PM

I agree with much of what Drew and Helene have posted above.

I saw the Mariinsky do Jewels about 10 years ago on tour in Berkeley and I thought they did an excellent account. Diamonds was especially fine because of the great partnership of Daria Pavlenko and Danila Korsutnev. They danced it neutrally, you might say agnostically, and it was very lovely.

The video of the recent of Mariinsky performance seems much less good, more mannered. The overly loving and too-knowing Paris Opera Ballet account might have influenced them.

It isn't so much speed with Balanchine as it is a certain directness and wit – and underlying melancholy. And without the right tone, there's no Balanchine, just the brand. (Ashton is another problematic choreographer where the right tone is very important to catch.)

Balanchine comes down to us as a small, alternative stream of Russian Imperial School style – antithetical to Vaganova – that joined up with the topsy turvy acrobatics of early twenties avant garde in Russia (of which Diaghilev's La Chatte is an example). So for Vaganova-trained dancers to do Balanchine might be difficult from the start due to contradictory styles and philosophies.

And undulating arms in Balanchine (and everywhere outside Swan Lake) are like too much vibrato in a violin or an opera singer.

#245 cubanmiamiboy

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 04:51 PM

And undulating arms in Balanchine (and everywhere outside Swan Lake) are like too much vibrato in a violin or an opera singer.


...and THOSE never-ending ondulations get on my nerves like craaaaaaaazy!! Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image

#246 Helene

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Posted 08 May 2013 - 03:28 PM

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#247 fififi

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Posted 08 May 2013 - 07:46 PM

[Admin beanie on]

The only promotion info that is valid for discussion must come from official news sources: the company itself (onstage announcements, websites, press releases, rosters), from the dancer's public Facebook, Twitter, blog, websites, and interviews with the mainstream media, or from the mainstream media.

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Helene, thank you for the warning. I understand that you incur rules based on what you believe is right. There is a strong reason to express whatever I think is right.

I was brought up with the belief that a prima ballerina has everything, a beautiful face, beautiful body, solid technique, virtuosity, stage presence, charisma, gracefulness, and so on.

I have spent so much time and money to see ballet performances hoping to see such a prima ballerina in the last 20 years. Some might say that I am sill not to be qualified to commnet on dancers' performances simply because I am not an expert (whatever this means). Of couse, no ballerina is perfect, however, most dancers performing leading roles kept inspiring me except for a few. Skorik is one, and, she belongs to the Mariinsky.

Empirically speaking, it seems obvious that Skorik is on her way to the top, that is, imho, wrong. I have looked for the reason why Fateyev gives Skorik so many principal roles. I only found this and put a partial translation using google:

http://vppress.ru/st...-ne-verte-16311

"- Actually, Oksana scold ...
- And who scold? Oksana, like any dancer can like and do not like it. But it has a unique texture, and do not use it would be a crime. These legs like hers, it is difficult to find. In addition, it has depth, there is an inner peace. She just needs time to open up. She is a born Odetta - not going anywhere."

There are so many female dancers with great feet/legs like Skorik's and also, her face is not really pretty. Consequently, I cannot help concluding that the reason why Fateyev gives Skorik principal roles must lie else where.

I strongly feel that Skorik should never be a principal dancer and would be willing to help to avoid this at all cost.

#248 Helene

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Posted 08 May 2013 - 08:55 PM


[Admin beanie on]

The only promotion info that is valid for discussion must come from official news sources: the company itself (onstage announcements, websites, press releases, rosters), from the dancer's public Facebook, Twitter, blog, websites, and interviews with the mainstream media, or from the mainstream media.

Other message boards or video sites are not official news. Please do not post unofficial news.

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Helene, thank you for the warning. I understand that you incur rules based on what you believe is right. There is a strong reason to express whatever I think is right.


The board rules are not negotiable. We're a private board, although we are visible to all, and we get to establish our own rules and guidelines and moderate as we see fit. Your choices are to follow them and post information and express your opinions within our rules and guidelines or decide that we're not a good fit for you and to post elsewhere.

The only people who can post information without a link to official sources are the few that are in the group "Editorial Advisors." Everyone else, including the Moderators and Administrators, are limited to posting news from official sources with citations. That includes me.

#249 Paul Parish

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Posted 08 May 2013 - 09:58 PM

I'm with Quiggin.

#250 Birdsall

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Posted 09 May 2013 - 08:28 AM

fififi,
Thanks for posting the link to that interview. I do not understand Fateyev at all. He loves Skorik and protects her no matter if she cancels that dance show (and left Yermakov in the lurch) and stumbles and falls many times. Everyone deserves second chances, but she seems to get 10 chances while others do not get a second chance. She is being treated like the best that Mariinsky has to offer, and that is strange. She has definitely improved, but there are so many ready for Prime Time.
The other thing is that Fateyev seems to think a main event of the past festival was Forsythe ballets. For me these Forsythe ballets are like giving opera singers some punk rock music to sing. Actually, Renee Fleming did release a cd of edgy/alternative pop songs a couple of years ago, so I guess I am a fuddy duddy. I need to chill out, I guess. But I really don't think many people on this planet want to go to the Mariinsky and see the Mariinsky Ballet do Forsythe.
Fateyev is the culprit. The entire ballet company should do a walk out asking for him to be removed.

#251 Fosca

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Posted 09 May 2013 - 08:51 AM

Fateyev gave an interview to the German dance magazine "tanz" in December 2012 (only in print, not online), permit me to cite one of his answers, just to contradict the impression that he forces his dancers to do Forsythe:

"Question: Are you afraid that your dancers might lose their pure, academic style when they dance Forsythe or other modern works?
Fateyev: No. The balance is important. When we first staged our Forsythe ballets in 2004, it was like fresh air for the dancers. It was good for them to control their own bodies in a totally different way. Everybody absolutely wanted to dance it. It's not a coincidence that we will put that evening back on the programme. I also think it's interesting what Forsythe is doing today, that's why his own company will guest at the Mariinsky festival in March. Thus we can show the contrast in his oeuvre until today - here his classical pieces, there his recent performance art."

And by the way: I loved the Mariinsky dancers in Forsythe, they did it in a very different, special style. Sorry, I'm European, I know we think different.

#252 Birdsall

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Posted 09 May 2013 - 08:59 AM

Yes, I lived in Germany, and so tradition has been rammed down Europeans' throats, so most Europeans do love new and modern things. I guess Americans have mostly modern art/pop culture, so many of us like to finally get some traditional stuff sometimes! LOL

I am also half Japanese, and for some reason classical arts appeal to us a lot.

#253 Helene

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Posted 09 May 2013 - 09:11 AM

Many thanks for the interview quote, Fosca!

Many dancers like to do things out of their fach or at least appreciate the challenge. What they like isn't always of the greatest quality -- something that feels good isn't necessarily something that looks good -- but it mixes things up for them, both in terms of vocabulary and movement styles and getting to work with choreographers and stagers outside their daily experience and sometimes out of their comfort zones. For neoclassically trained dancers, at least, I've often seen how their experience in works that I don't think highly of informs and energizes the works I do think highly of.

#254 Catherine

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Posted 13 May 2013 - 04:15 AM

I only found this and put a partial translation using google:

http://vppress.ru/st...-ne-verte-16311

"- Actually, Oksana scold ...
- And who scold? Oksana, like any dancer can like and do not like it. But it has a unique texture, and do not use it would be a crime. These legs like hers, it is difficult to find. In addition, it has depth, there is an inner peace. She just needs time to open up. She is a born Odetta - not going anywhere."


I just wanted to offer a more accurate translation of that here bc (as a professional translator) I cannot stand Google Translate, and also I think the actual words will be more easy to understand:
"Actually people criticize Oksana..."
-"Who criticizes her? You may or may not like Oksana, just like any ballerina. But her appearance is unique, and to not use her would be a crime. Legs like hers are hard to find. In addition, she has depth, she has an internal world. We have to just give her time to develop. She is a born Odette - you can't escape that."

#255 fififi

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Posted 13 May 2013 - 04:28 AM

Catherine, thanks very much. It is very interesting. I did not know that Skorik has been criticised in Russia to the extent that a news paper journalist mentioned in an interview.


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