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Saturday, September 8


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#1 dirac

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Posted 08 September 2012 - 04:56 PM

Christian Siriano's new collection is inspired by ballet.

He saved the most dramatic gesture for the end: There was an audible gasp when not one but three models came out to show the final look, striding three across with one slightly in front, as if in a ballet sequence.

They wore flowing tulle applique dresses, one in watercolor, one in pink, and one in sea foam. “Those three looks came straight from ‘The Dream,’” he said backstage, explaining that a friend had brought him to examine the ABT costumes firsthand.

#2 dirac

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Posted 08 September 2012 - 04:58 PM

An NPR story on the plans for Cuba's new dance center. Text and audio.

A radical proposal to restore one of Cuba's most important architectural landmarks is rekindling a 50-year-old controversy. At the center is ballet superstar Carlos Acosta, who left the island and went on to a lead role in London's Royal Ballet. Acosta wants to return to the island and restore an abandoned ballet school with help from one of the world's most famous architects.

But the proposal has opened old wounds from the school's past and stirred a debate about the future of Cuba's state-sponsored cultural model.

#3 dirac

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Posted 08 September 2012 - 05:00 PM

Jorma Elo makes a new piece for Boston Ballet's season opener. Story by Karen Campbell in The Boston Globe.

But Elo says he considers Boston Ballet his artistic home. His work with the company has molded his style of choreography, especially with regard to pointe work, he says. In turn, Nissinen asserts, the ballets Elo has created especially for the company’s dancers have transformed the way they approach contemporary work, stretching them technically and artistically. “He has a unique voice,” Nissinen says. “His pieces are very physical and athletic, very difficult. Asking the dancers to master this work has helped the company to be strong.”

But Nissinen also cites the emotional subtlety and commitment Elo’s choreography demands, a particular challenge for many young dancers. “He guides them, helps them mature as artists, to understand a work in many different layers, that you have to come out with an aura of feeling, you have to focus,” Nissinen says.

#4 dirac

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Posted 08 September 2012 - 05:03 PM

An interview with Amy Fote on dancing Madame Butterfly and her forthcoming retirement from Houston Ballet.

"Butterfly is so close to my heart. I don't want to anticipate it, but let it happen," she says. "The role is so heartfelt and moving. It's a role any dancer would hope to do. The emotional arc gets inside you. Cho-Cho-San is so trusting of Pinkerton. She thinks that she is so special, and doesn't see what's coming at all when Pinkerton abandons her."
Over her eight years with the company, Fote has danced Butterfly with Ian Casady, Simon Ball and Nicholas Leschke, enjoying what each dancer has brought to the role of Pinkerton, the dashing ne'er-do-well who leaves Cho-Cho-San.

#5 dirac

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Posted 08 September 2012 - 05:04 PM

Dayton Ballet celebrates its seventy-fifth annual season.

In addition to the organization’s revitalized “Nutcracker,” highlights include artistic director Karen Russo Burke’s world premiere of “Cinderella” and choreographer Amy Seiwert’s world premiere to be seen among season opener “Past and Present,” which will feature the return of Russo Burke’s “Sleepy Hollow.” The highly anticipated climax, aptly titled “Celebration!,” will revive multiple routines created by former Dayton Ballet impresarios as Dermot Burke, Bess Saylor Imber, Jon Rodriguez and Stuart Sebastian.

#6 dirac

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Posted 09 September 2012 - 09:26 PM

A brief note on Divertimento from ‘Le Baiser de la Fée by Joan Acocella in the 17 September issue of The New Yorker.

Now the ballet is all dancing, beautiful and sometimes—as in the hero’s famous solo—very strange. I think Balanchine may have wanted to push the story back down into the steps, so that it might pulse under them, haunt them.




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