bart

Let's talk about the 2012-2013 season

113 posts in this topic

The reason I made that distinction is because in the big state academies, they select kids between eight and ten that pass all of the physical tests, for turnout, extension, strong feet and back, and whatever body type they're looking for. (They traditionally check out the family to see what's in the gene pool.)

They are investing is a very specific few, and those few get exceptional stylistic and technical training and a core curriculum from the time that they are very young. If a dancer joins the SAB Professional Division at 13, chances are s/he's just uprooted him or herself at the same time s/he's going through puberty, and she's three-five years behind in that school's training. If as a child s/he's studied with a great teacher who's given him or her great basics and a sense of style, that's fantastic, but that's not always the case. If the dancer wants an education, s/he arranges it independently of SAB, and isn't given a mandatory curriculum integrated into the dance training.

I mentioned Zien, because as a child she and her sister were "Nutcracker" kids, and she was Little Red Riding Hood in Peter Martin's "The Sleeping Beauty," a piece of theatrical brilliance. She was one of the kids who started young in the school and joined the PD later.

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I mentioned Zien, because as a child she and her sister were "Nutcracker" kids, and she was Little Red Riding Hood in Peter Martin's "The Sleeping Beauty," a piece of theatrical brilliance. She was one of the kids who started young in the school and joined the PD later.

I don't know if anyone has mentioned this but Zoe Zion's mother is Suzy Pilarre- former NYCB soloist who danced with the company for 15 or 16 years. Zion lived in NYC and certainly had a lot of guidance.

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Thanks, vipa, for that information. Zien is one of the favorite dancers of several of us on B.A. She has a way of phrasing and making shapes that is subtly (though never obtrusively) different from those of her her fellow dancers. You notice this especially when he is dancing parallel to someone else in one of the lead corps or soloist roles.

For an idea about Lopez's intentions for Morphoses, the NY Times has a review of that project's latest program at the Joyce in NYC. The feature work, "Within (Labyrinth Within)" by dancer Pontus Lidberg, involves both film and a small cast of dancers. Brian Siebert's review is full of interesting details and is generally quite positive. Sounds like a good match for MCB's dancers and budget. I am already starting to think about which dancers to cast for the leads. Isanusi Garcia-Rodriguez, generally underutilized in MCB's standard rep, came immediately in mind for the male protagonist.

http://www.nytimes.c...l?ref=arts&_r=0

When the film’s danced duets come, the gentle push and pull, the elastic power dynamic of Mr. Lidberg’s choreography, is colored by the story’s violent emotions. The story is familiar — and the denouement a little groan-worthy — but the combination is fresh.

Now that Ms. Lopez has become artistic director of Miami City Ballet and has announced her intention to take Morphoses with her, the company will have to manage an even trickier marriage. The unlikely accomplishment of “Within (Labyrinth Within)” is a good sign.

Thanks, vipa, for that information. Zien is one of the favorite dancers of several of us on B.A. She has a way of phrasing and making shapes that is subtly (though never obtrusively) different from those of her her fellow dancers. You notice this especially when he is dancing parallel to someone else in one of the lead corps or soloist roles.

For an idea about Lopez's intentions for Morphoses, the NY Times has a review of that project's latest program at the Joyce in NYC. The feature work, "Within (Labyrinth Whithin)" by dancer Pontus Lidberg, involves both film and a small cast of dancers. Brian Siebert's review is full of interesting details and is generally quite positive. Sounds like a good match for MCB's dancers and budget. I am already starting to think about which dancers to cast for the leads. Isanusi Garcia-Rodriguez, generally underutilized in MCB's standard rep, came immediately in mind for the male protagonist.

http://www.nytimes.c...l?ref=arts&_r=0

When the film’s danced duets come, the gentle push and pull, the elastic power dynamic of Mr. Lidberg’s choreography, is colored by the story’s violent emotions. The story is familiar — and the denouement a little groan-worthy — but the combination is fresh.

Now that Ms. Lopez has become artistic director of Miami City Ballet and has announced her intention to take Morphoses with her, the company will have to manage an even trickier marriage. The unlikely accomplishment of “Within (Labyrinth Within)” is a good sign.

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Agree with bart about Zien. She has a distinctive way of moving...a subtle, restrained elegance and, as bart says, makes herself visible right away onstage. I would love to see her in major roles already, and it seems to me she's somehow overdue for a promotion.

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On Saturday, I caught the second of 3 Open Barre presentations at the MCB studio. The program was entitled "See the Music, Hear the Dance: Neoclassicism: Apollo & Duo Concertant," For me it was a welcome chance to watch Lourdes Lopez interacting with audience and dancers. Gary Sheldon, the very smart director of MCB's orchestra, was co-presenter.

In the musical discussion that opened the performance, Sheldon was very good at demonstrating t the piano the way that Stravinsky changed "classicism" to something new and different. Then Lopez took over with the dancers, asking Kleber Rebello -- and later Tricia Albertson -- to perform a standard classical combination. After each demonstration, she asked them to perform the same steps as Balanchine re-imagined them in Duo Concertant -- jazzier, more driven and off-balance, marvelously altered as to detail. Later, when Albertson and Rebello performed the full Duo Concertant to piano and violin, each of these illustrations seemed to stand out.You could not help but look closely and notice how the details had been altered: flexed (not pointed) feet. Rhythmic ups and downs of the foot in releve. Unexpected shifts in direction and port de bras in chaine turns. For me, this was revelatory.

Following that, Lopez led Mary Carmen Catoya and Reyneris Reyes through a slightly different exercise based on choreography from Apollo pas de deux. The joy here was watching superb dancers from seats less than 20 feet away, without lighting or orchestration. Most striking was the chance to observe a standard classical press lift and then its brilliant reinvention -- the "Swimming Lesson." Catoya, by the way, was completely delightful in the q&a. She an turn on the hauteur on stage, as in Ballet Imperial; but she is also the "youngest" and most spontaneously funny and bewitching Coppelia in the company. A genuine and complex artist.

Apollo Pas de Deux. The pas de deux itself, played to recorded music, was beautifully dance. Reyes mentioned that he had never danced the part before. An injury had prevented him from dancing in the first set of performances. His Apollo has stature, gravitas, and strong technique. After watching the pas de deux, I hope to have the chance to see him in the complete ballet. Catoya was ... superb. Lopez clearly loves her. This was seamless dancing, pure and very clear. She ranks with the best Terpsichores I have seen, while reminding me of no one else.

Duo Concertant. MCB has some remarkable musical resources. Two of them shared the program: Francisco Renno (piano) and the orchestra's new first violinist, Alla Krolevich, who comes to Miami from St. Petersburg. I have strong visual and emotional memories of Peter Martins and Kay Mazzo premiering the ballet during the Stravinsky Festival. It's due to them that I think of this as one of Balanchine's best works (certainly one of the best pas de deux). Martins especially was an experienced performer, who gave weight to the movement and emotional meaning to the situation (two dancers listen to musicians playing, begin to create dances to the music). Kleber Rebello, very young, a dancer of air and light, would not have been my first choice for the man's role. I was wrong. Tricia Albertson, too, surprised me with her delicacy, clarity, and warmth. The woman seated next to me murmered "lovely" at the fade out. I agree. Greater depth will come. For the time being, "lovely" is an excellent start for dancers quite new to these roles.

Meanwhile, Lopez was completely engaged in listening, watching, supporting her dancers, projecting real respect for the art form she grew up with under Balanchine. She has stage presence without pushing herself forward. Unlike Villella, she seems completely comfortable in conversation with her audience, her musician colleagues, and her dancers. This presentation was promising indeed.

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Cristian, I wish you had been there. Being so close to the dancers is a privilege, I think, and makes me appreciate even more how difficult it is for them to make what they do look smooth, seemless, and "easy." Everyone somehow seems relaxed and at home, even though the formalities of performance are not ignored. I will never forget Mary Carmen Catoya in the brief q&a -- breaking into a huge, irresistible smile as she patted herself on her chest and said, "You feel it here. In the HEART" "

There are no assigned seats, so it's possible to get in the first row (at the level of the floor) if you get there early. Maybe next time?

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There are no assigned seats, so it's possible to get in the first row (at the level of the floor) if you get there early. Maybe next time?

Yes...the visuals are completely diferent there at floor level. I wish Reyes would had been able to perform in Apollo. He has the handsome look needed.

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Reyes seemed tentative but his partnering was secure. They did only the pas de deux. Presuming that he has recovered from his injury, he might get a chance to dance the complete ballet in West Palm.

I have been thinking, "MCB has quite a few Muses, but I'm less sure about Apollo." Wouldn't it be nice of if Reyes proved me wrong."

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... I will never forget Mary Carmen Catoya in the brief q&a -- breaking into a huge, irresistible smile as she patted herself on her chest and said, "You feel it here. In the HEART"

I hope that you also remember what "q" provoked that - heartfelt - remark (sorry for the pun, I couldn't resist, the lady's name has levitating associations for my spirits), and that you can share it with us.

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Sorry, Jack, but I don't recall the question. I THINK it was something about what it feels like to dance Balanchine, but I might be misremembering.

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Great news, brokenwing. I note that the grant is for increasing outreach and adding new works, including new commisions.

Related to that, Liam Scarlett -- in town to create his new, ballet, which will be on Program II -- joined the pre-performance talks at all performances in West Palm. He said that it would be a program-closer, a "bigger" work than
Viscera
. The music will be another piano concerto by Lowell Lieberman. No word on the title.

MCB should be proud that
Viscera
, a ballet created for and premiered by them, has now entered the rep of the Royal Ballet.

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