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Where did the word "fouetté" come from?


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#1 kbarber

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Posted 22 August 2012 - 07:01 AM

Second post in my "etymology of ballet terms" series: http://toursenlair.b...rd-fouette.html

#2 bart

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Posted 22 August 2012 - 04:06 PM

Fascinating. Didn't know about the beech saplings (fouets). I did know that fouette is connected with "whipped," but have to confess that I associate this with a non-ballet mental image of Julia Child maniacally beating up a meringue or a souffle in a metal bowl cradled in her arm. Posted Image Posted Image

I don't recall seeing anything like way Valdes places her 3 sets of multiple pirouettes. She interrupts them with simple but strong single fouettes. Each of the pirouette sequences reflects (or is reflected by) a change in music. This is rather an austere combination, which makes it even more exciting.

Some Odiles may be flashier, but this is the only one I would actually be afraid of, if I came across her whipping down a dark street late at night.

#3 Moonlily

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Posted 23 August 2012 - 10:12 AM

Some Odiles may be flashier, but this is the only one I would actually be afraid of, if I came across her whipping down a dark street late at night.


What a nice...eh, frightening image! :) But it is exactly that kind of feeling.

Thank you again, kbarber, for the very insightful explanation!


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