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WHO first said that Sleeping Beauty epitomized the classical ballet?several of my dance-scholar friends are asking this right now.


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#16 bart

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Posted 14 August 2012 - 04:59 AM

Will be checking our excellent and relatively well-funded county library system today- Thanks for the suggestion, Birdsall.

#17 lmspear

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Posted 14 August 2012 - 06:21 AM

Will be checking our excellent and relatively well-funded county library system today- Thanks for the suggestion, Birdsall.

You may also be eligible log into your alma mater's library system with alumni privileges.

#18 puppytreats

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Posted 14 August 2012 - 06:32 AM





I recommend you read the article I posted about as she addresses all these questions.

Alas, the price on jstor is $22.00 (U.S.) for a PDF file.


You might check to see if your local library has databases that you can access on their computers for full text articles. Many libraries have subscriptions. Of course, you might not care enough to do this. Just wanted to throw an idea out if you did really, really want to access it.


Yes, Birdsall, great suggestion. That's how I access it, through Toronto Public Library. It's fantastic to have this free resource to in-depth scholarly discussions.



People forget about libraries and think they are dying, but they are busier than ever! And, yes, one of the great things is access to databases with full text articles to journals past and present.


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#19 puppytreats

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Posted 14 August 2012 - 06:44 AM

Thanks for the links to discussions past, Bart. I liked this contrast that Alexandra gave:


Or [the use] could be descriptive, to denote that she was a classical rather than a romantic ballerina. The classical ballerina's arabesque implies a circle; the romantic ballerina's an oval. This has to do with body proportions, and also with the fact that classical shoulders are squared, romantic shoulders droop.


I watched "Balanchine Essay: Arabesque" yesterday, which featured Suki Shorer and Merrill Ashley. They seemed to imply that an arabesque formed a V, which seemed to me to be the counterpart of the Willis arms. I think of when a director uses a clipboard and clips it, in a cutting action, to mark the scene. The effect of this is emphasized in the sissone. Although, the arabesque in "4 Ts" (I think) sometimes looks like doors or gates being pushed to swing open.


Suki and Merrill also emphasized standing straight on the supporting hip, vertically, with the other hip open. Does this differ from classical arabesque? I thought the hips were square, facing front, even with the chest pushed forward in a classical pose.


In the extra scenes to "Sylphide", Aurelie Dupont talks about being coached to lean forward in her Romantic arabesque, which was different from her normal training.


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