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Tuesday, July 17


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#1 dirac

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Posted 17 July 2012 - 12:45 PM

A summary of the pointing fingers mess at Miami City Ballet by Mallika Rao for The Huffington Post.

Point: The board's choice of successor was spiteful.

Back in January, Villella supporter Henry Pownall predicted the board would ignore Villella's choice of successor, with the statement: "I have a horrible feeling that the company will be destroyed. I also fear they will be petty and purposely not let Edward pick someone.” Indeed, the vote was 9-2 in favor of Lourdes Lopez -- opposed only by Villella and a dancer.

Counterpoint: The board's choice of successor was near-perfect.

In January, Harriet Pownall's primary worry was that the board would disregard the Balanchine tradition in their choice of successor. Lopez, however, is a Balanchine disciple, a fact that caused the The New York Times to assert "it seems hard to imagine someone with a better resume for the job."



#2 dirac

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Posted 17 July 2012 - 12:47 PM

A review of the Paris Opera Ballet in "Giselle" by Robert Johnson in The Star-Ledger.

Although this staging represents the usual layered accretions—not the 1841 original—it contains a typically French emphasis on aerial "batterie," sometimes including steps of spine-tingling historicity. An acquaintance pointed out that in the Peasant Pas de Deux, on Friday, Fabien Révillion performed the rarely seen "brisé Télémaque," a brilliant combination of beats introduced in 1790. Lucky ticket-holders may see it again tonight.

Three sets of Paris Opera Ballet stars illumine the leading roles in different ways. Aurélie Dupont was the most technically assured Giselle on Friday, while on Saturday afternoon dramatic Isabelle Ciaravola lent the role a wistful perfume, partnered by Karl Paquette’s athletic Albrecht. On Saturday evening, Clairemarie Osta and Nicolas Le Riche were intimately matched in a performance of wild and mystic dimensions. Osta and Le Riche will make their farewells on Thursday; and the Paris Opera engagement concludes this weekend.



#3 dirac

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Posted 17 July 2012 - 12:50 PM

Montgomery Ballet is in financial trouble. Video.

Darren McIntyre is the ballet's new artistic director. A professional dancer himself, he knows the level of talent the Montgomery ballet brings to the area. "It's after working in New York and Chicago and Milwaukee, I realized, wow, this is amazing that these dancers are here in Montgomery."

But like many arts organizations, donations are down and funding has taken a hit. "Always, the arts is the first thing to suffer."



#4 dirac

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Posted 17 July 2012 - 12:52 PM

Stephen Moonesamy, the ballet dancer who duped 75 children into believing they would perform at the Olympics closing ceremony, is sentenced.

Moonesamy, from Northampton, admitted he charged the three schools fees of £625 claiming he was authorised to select and recruit dancers for the closing ceremony.

Moonesamy, who pleaded guilty to eight fraud charges in total, was sentenced to two years in prison.



#5 dirac

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Posted 17 July 2012 - 12:54 PM

New York City Ballet photo gallery.

On the spur of the moment, the Times Union’s Social Scene photographer Joe Putrock snapped some incredible pictures at Saturday evening’s NYCB Gala Night performance. The evening featured two SPAC premieres – “Millepied Sp. 2012″ and “Les Carillons” - as well as dancer Justin Peck’s world premieres “New Peck.”



#6 dirac

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Posted 18 July 2012 - 04:28 PM

A review of New York City Ballet by Alastair Macaulay in The New York Times.

Despite the pun, “In Creases” is not a funny ballet. Its title is a comment on its score, Philip Glass’s “Four Movements for Two Pianos,” in both the way this music falls into a series of sections and how its sections build in momentum and power. The two pianos are onstage, at the back, facing each other. There are eight dancers — four male, four female. Women wear blue-gray leotards; men wear black socks and dance slippers beneath pale two-tone overall tights (white and grayish blue). Costumes are by Mr. Peck and Marc Happel. Though it’s possible the male attire may grow on me, I wouldn’t bank on it.

Yet that doesn’t distract. This is choreography whose forms immediately seize attention. There’s no moment, as so often occurs with young ballet choreographers, when we spot Mr. Peck’s sources. Doubtless he’s steeped in Balanchine, Robbins and others, but he isn’t wearing them on his sleeve. His ensemble keeps giving way to brief but quasi-climactic images to individuals. The way lone dramas or dances keep being absorbed by the group is what gives the dance its particular flavor. Gestures, images, sequences leap out and pass as if in a dream or in a changing cloud.



#7 dirac

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Posted 18 July 2012 - 04:31 PM

The Saratoga city council casts a vote in favor of keeping New York City Ballet's summer season.

Reached by phone Tuesday, SPAC President and CEO Marcia White said she, too, supports the NYC Ballet but said the financial structure of the organizations’ relationship is unsustainable.


“The NYC Ballet and SPAC are in the same position and want the same thing,” she said. “The question is about the economics.”



#8 dirac

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Posted 18 July 2012 - 04:43 PM

A review of the Paris Opera Ballet by Robert Greskovic in The Wall Street Journal.

The current Paris version, staged by Patrice Bart and Eugène Polyakov, breathes with the distinct schooling of the company's namesake affiliate academy. The weakest aspects of the presentation are the settings and costumes, which reduce Alexandre Benois's 1924 designs to mostly pale and thin renderings. Peach hues wash over the village setting like a slightly saccharine mist; overly inky darkness makes the nighttime atmosphere of forest look pervasively flat.

With, however, its consistently detailed dancing and extensive pantomime, much of which is ignored in current stagings elsewhere in the world, the ballet rides to rewarding and distinctly Parisian heights. Striking effects reveal themselves, but these remain an integral part of the ballet's marvelously arranged fabric: Think finely woven tapestry rather than a highlight-heavy patchwork sampler. Of course, the leading roles of Giselle and Albrecht (her duplicitous, noble lover), as well as Myrtha, queen of the ghostly Wili sisters, demand stellar performances, which not every cast during the run was able to deliver.




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