leonid17

Sergei Polunin Appearances

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Premiere performances of the ballet “Coppelia” by Roland Petit will take place on July 8, 9 and 27. Staging by Luigi Bonino (Italy), Set Designer – Ezio Frigerio, Costume Designer – Franca Squarciapino, Lighting Designer – Jean-Michel Desire.

http://www.stanmus.com/performance.html?id=80#people

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http://www.tvc.ru/Sh...date=13.02.2008Sergei Polunin in rehearsal of "Coppelia."

for Google translation of text, go to http://translate.goo...te%3D13.02.2008

It is interesting that there is an implied criticism of the coaching at Royal Ballet, as being a restrictive element in what he saw as his personal development as a performing artist.

For photographic essay

http://visualrian.ru...%BD%D0%B8%D0%BD

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Possibly off topic but I believe worthy of note, that article contains a blurb by Kristina Shapran, who's listed as dancing Swanhilda, correct?i can't quite cipher the machine translation, but it's good to see she's getting roles at the Stanislavsky!

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Indeed, Trieste -- that is the lovely Kristina Shapran dancing Swanilda opposite Polunin's Frantz and Bonini's Dr. Coppelius. Did you see the little TV filmclip? (First link that Leonid posted, above.)

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http://www.tvc.ru/Sh...date=13.02.2008Sergei Polunin in rehearsal of "Coppelia."

for Google translation of text, go to http://translate.goo...te%3D13.02.2008

It is interesting that there is an implied criticism of the coaching at Royal Ballet, as being a restrictive element in what he saw as his personal development as a performing artist.

For photographic essay

http://visualrian.ru...%BD%D0%B8%D0%BD

Again in an earlier interview, Polunin refers to a lack of freedom at the Royal Ballet. http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p00r2cqb

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I just listened to the old interview for the first time--I don't at all begrudge Polunin his search for freedom, self-realization etc.--I'm a lot older than he is and often have the same yearnings -- but listening to his ruminations I'm not convinced one can put much blame on the Royal's "lack of freedom" for his departure; he sounds like a very restless young man...If he had started at the Stanislavsky, then he might now be at the Royal...(I was mostly struck by his joke about changing countries--which is just what he has now done.)

As for the more recent interview: he describes Roland Petit giving him more choices dancing Petit's Coppelia than the Royal coaches gave him with the choreography he danced at the Royal. Well, the original choreographer is still there to guide him and tell him if he (the choreographer) doesn't like something Polunin tries out, so it's easier to grant the freedom in the first place. One hears similar stories re Balanchine telling dancers to do what they want w. their arms etc. But if I were a Royal coach guiding someone in the work of Petit or Balanchine or Ashton (!!!) -- well, of course I would be unlikely to let even a very talented 21 year old do what he wants with his hands as he says Petit did.

Anyway, will there really be "more freedom" at the Stanislavsky generally (not just when the choreographer is right there leading rehearsal) and would that even be a good thing? Maybe yes and maybe no; I couldn't venture a guess.

[Edited later to say that the translation confused me about Polunin working w. Petit--he did not. Annamicro made the correction below...]

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As for the more recent interview: he describes Roland Petit giving him more choices dancing Petit's Coppelia than the Royal coaches gave him with the choreography he danced at the Royal. Well, the original choreographer is still there to guide him and tell him if he (the choreographer) doesn't like something Polunin tries out, so it's easier to grant the freedom in the first place.

Roland Petit died one year ago (July 10, 2011) and I don't remember that Sergei has ever worked with him, has anybody a different information? Maybe there is something wrong with the translation.

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I just listened to the old interview for the first time--I don't at all begrudge Polunin his search for freedom, self-realization etc.--I'm a lot older than he is and often have the same yearnings -- but listening to his ruminations I'm not convinced one can put much blame on the Royal's "lack of freedom" for his departure; he sounds like a very restless young man...If he had started at the Stanislavsky, then he might now be at the Royal...(I was mostly struck by his joke about changing countries--which is just what he has now done.)

As for the more recent interview: he describes Roland Petit giving him more choices dancing Petit's Coppelia than the Royal coaches gave him with the choreography he danced at the Royal. Well, the original choreographer is still there to guide him and tell him if he (the choreographer) doesn't like something Polunin tries out, so it's easier to grant the freedom in the first place. One hears similar stories re Balanchine telling dancers to do what they want w. their arms etc. But if I were a Royal coach guiding someone in the work of Petit or Balanchine or Ashton (!!!) -- well, of course I would be unlikely to let even a very talented 21 year old do what he wants with his hands as he says Petit did.

Anyway, will there really be "more freedom" at the Stanislavsky generally (not just when the choreographer is right there leading rehearsal) and would that even be a good thing? Maybe yes and maybe no; I couldn't venture a guess.

A coach is a coach is a coach, especially if the ballet is “Cinderella” in which Sergei Polunin played the role for at least five performances.

Over two years ago he was every inch a Prince in “Nutcracker” followed weeks later by his extraordinarily stylish Prince in “The Sleeping Beauty.” The following month he was the Prince in “Cinderella” where he gave a most stylish performance in a marvellous partnership with Yuhui Choe.

Mr.Polunin successfully essayed the role of Aminta in “Sylvia” followed by the Prince in “Cinderella” on several occasions and a further performance of Aminta in “Sylvia”

In the January of 2011 he danced “Albrecht” twice and in April there was a dream of a performance of “Cinderella” with Alina Cojocaru.

This was followed by four more performances of “Cinderella.”

In the Royal Ballet’s summer tour to the Far East he danced Albrecht with Marinella Nunez.

Back in London he was a marvel in “Marguerite and Armand” with Tamara Rojo and again with Rojo and Lauren Cuthbertson.

In the run up to Christmas 2011 he partnered Cuthbertson as Aurora on two or three occasions was the Prince to the Sugar Plum Fairy on several occasions and remained the choice of the Prince into January this year.

That he had become a Prince of choice by Dame Monica Mason there is no doubt and with that responsibility and his confidence

arising from his undoubted successes with audiences and critics,

I see no fault in his choice of aesthetics as to the manner in which he wished to present himself on stage.

Perhaps he even felt he deserved to be trusted?

Mr. Polunin is undoubtedly a refined artist of the ballet, who it would appear, saw his career developing through his abilities to develop characterisations that both suited his physicality and his

interpretations of the roles he performed

I feel he had nothing to prove to anyone, repetiteur or coach. Such

exceptions in performance had been allowed to other dancers in the past.

The inner conflict was real, as Dame Monica Mason when asked about Mr Polunin sensitively explained in her talk given at Ivy House during the recent Pavlova celebrations. She described Mr Polunin as being something of an outsider in the school and the company.

Thank goodness this never showed on stage and in over fifty years of watching ballet, all I can say, is thank goodness for the outsiders I have witnessed who were exceptional performers.

As to your,” Anyway, will there really be "more freedom" at the Stanislavsky.” Generally speaking it’s a possibility. Individual highly talented young dancers in Russia have frequently been given their head to allow personally found inner confidence to grow and often with a coach of either a paternal or maternal concern for their success.

On reflection it was his first performance as the Bronze Idol in "La Bayadere" back in 2007. that a hurried discussion took place among a group of older ballet goers in that we had all been struck as to the potentially significant dancer of the future, that the teenage Mr Polunin might become.

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As for the more recent interview: he describes Roland Petit giving him more choices dancing Petit's Coppelia than the Royal coaches gave him with the choreography he danced at the Royal. Well, the original choreographer is still there to guide him and tell him if he (the choreographer) doesn't like something Polunin tries out, so it's easier to grant the freedom in the first place.

Roland Petit died one year ago (July 10, 2011) and I don't remember that Sergei has ever worked with him, has anybody a different information? Maybe there is something wrong with the translation.

You are exactly right--the translation misled me -- the English makes it sound as if Polunin is literally referring to Petit -- and my brain did not kick in to remind of the latter's death (though, when I read it, I was mildly surprised he was 'still alive!')...so my point about that is...uh...pretty null.

Leonid -- Polunin sounds quite extraordinary and perhaps his talent will indeed find a more comfortable home at the Stanislavsky...

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The inner conflict was real, as Dame Monica Mason when asked about Mr Polunin sensitively explained in her talk given at Ivy House during the recent Pavlova celebrations. She described Mr Polunin as being something of an outsider in the school and the company.

Thank goodness this never showed on stage and in over fifty years of watching ballet, all I can say, is thank goodness for the outsiders I have witnessed who were exceptional performers.

There is a long list of outsiders on Mason book (to make just an example, the past year she denied Aurora to Cojocaru because, in her opinion, she didn't suite her Sleeping Beauty production...). One of her most famous outsider forced to leave, Sylvie Guillem, is giving here an answer and an advice to Polunin (at 23'10"). The interview is extremely interesting and also entertaining, but she is speaking (excellently) in Italian...

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You are exactly right--the translation misled me -- the English makes it sound as if Polunin is literally referring to Petit -- and my brain did not kick in to remind of the latter's death (though, when I read it, I was mildly surprised he was 'still alive!')...so my point about that is...uh...pretty null.

I suppose I had the same translation as you smile.png , let's hope it is just Google fault and not in the original text!

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During Mason's tenure as director of the RB hasn't been memorable for her treatment of personnel, the loss of Putrov and Polunin has harmed the company immeasurably and both these losses could have been averted. As for Sylvie Guillem, what logic or lack of it caused Mason to let go the biggest star in the world of ballet?

This thread is not about Monica Mason, but thank God she's retiring.

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During Mason's tenure as director of the RB hasn't been memorable for her treatment of personnel, the loss of Putrov and Polunin has harmed the company immeasurably and both these losses could have been averted. As for Sylvie Guillem, what logic or lack of it caused Mason to let go the biggest star in the world of ballet?

This thread is not about Monica Mason, but thank God she's retiring.

I have a strong feeling that Putrov was fired by a long list of female colleagues more than from Mason. Anyway, as you said, thank God she is going (not competely), even if several years too late. Anyway many are already missing her: "she served the Company" they say. dunno.gif

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During Mason's tenure as director of the RB hasn't been memorable for her treatment of personnel, the loss of Putrov and Polunin has harmed the company immeasurably and both these losses could have been averted. As for Sylvie Guillem, what logic or lack of it caused Mason to let go the biggest star in the world of ballet?

This thread is not about Monica Mason, but thank God she's retiring.

No lack of logic, like many other ballet goers I blame Sylvie Guillem along with several other dancers as having over time, a negative effect upon genuine aesthetic of Academic Classical Ballet, turning a high art into an entertainment in which certain members of the audience are thrilled by vulgarity.

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... negative effect upon genuine aesthetic of Academic Classical Ballet, turning a high art into an entertainment in which certain members of the audience are thrilled by vulgarity.

Loved that..! happy.png

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Although I personally have some sympathy for your assessment of Ms Guillem the fact remains that she was a megastar and filled the house whenever she appeared and I can assure you the bunch of nonentities Ms Mason has assembled for our delectation in a succession of scintillating works by her favourite choreographer, Wayne McGregor don't have the same pulling power by a long chalk.

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‘'...... I can assure you the bunch of nonentities Ms Mason has assembled for our delectation in a succession of scintillating works by her favourite choreographer, Wayne McGregor don't have the same pulling power by a long chalk. ''

The argument of getting young people into the Opera House through Mr McGregor's works was a fallacy and it goes to show how incompetent the Board of the Royal Opera House has become since the days when Sir John Tooley's or Sir David Webster were a beneficial influence.

The rot set in at the Royal Ballet despite some major creations, with Sir Kenneth MacMillan's directorship. When that most distinguished dancer Sir Anthony Dowell followed, sadly he proved to be a less than able Director and it was in his era, the Royal has lost its way.

What were the pressures put upon Dame Monica and where from. The Arts Council England? Trendy aging left wing dance critics influencing the board through their reviews? Where did this idea of getting younger student types given seats in the orchestra stalls to boost a response to MacGregors works come from?

Of course living in an era of dumbing down, where what is new is to be seen as ''good'' and what is old is seen as ''bad,'' or, Academic Classical Ballet is not what young people want to see and brain washing style multi-media dance events are. Really? I think not.

Anyone can do a random age check at the Royal Opera House and see who attends and in what numbers whether for the older or the newer repertoire. There has been no impact on the attendance of the older audience by a younger audience

.

‘’And what of the future?’’ I hear is the cry. ‘’We need to get a younger audience in to replace the ageing patrons.’’

The employment of ‘’off the wall’’ dance works will not get audiences coming again and again to the same productions, as they have always done with the major classical corpus of the Royal Ballet repertoire.

For me the revival of ''Sylvia'' was the best step that Dame Monica took as Director and led the way in the revival of better performances. On looking back on her tenure, it would seem that there are various pressures put on the Royal's repertoire that have little to do with straightforward ''High Art'' presentations such as befits the status of the premier UK opera house and its premier ballet company.

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A video of Sergei Polunin and Kristina Shapran in Coppelia has appeared on Youtube:

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Here's a video that was just posted from a show on Rossiya K (Kultur?):

There's a date (18 Nov) under the video post date (28 Nov), which might be when the 14-minute segment aired. Interspersed throughout are clips of Polunin in the Roland Petit "Coppelia" -- interesting distribution of music on Petit's part -- and in "Don Q," as well as in the studio and at a trendy photo shoot. There's also a bit towards the end of him with Zelensky backstage. (IZ's hair might be thinning, but it brings out the planes of his face, and he looks to be in perfect shape.)

I'm afraid the only words I understood were "teatr," "ABT," and "New York," but Polunin has beautiful eyes, and no language skills are necessary for that.

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The feelings experienced by these two "outsider" dancers had

already happened to other exclusive wonderfulltalented dancers who joinwd the Royal Ballet. In fact no other than Ruddi Nureyev, although he was worshiped by the audience he was basically a very lonely young man. His partnership with Margo was more than just dance involved, she supported him, looked after him, loved him and was refreshed by his youth, both on stage and off.

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Polunin’s Crown Prince Rudolf in Mayerling reviewed. Ismene Brown Blog. 25 March 2013.

"The former Royal Ballet star, who quit London just a year ago, is said to have sent half the audience into ecstasies

at the Stanislavsky and Nemirovich-Danchenko theatre (known as the “Stasik”), and the run is apparently sold out."

theartsdesk in Moscow: Sergei Polunin triumphs in Mayerling. Natalie Wheen. 25 March 2013.

"So I’ll begin with Polunin: though it will be impossible to do justice to what he showed us on stage."

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On Bolshoi's website there is a performance of Giselle scheduled on June 10, 2013, in which the dancers are

Giselle, the peasant girl ...... Svetlana Zakharova

Count Albrecht ................... Sergei Polunin

Hans, the gamekeeper ...... Andrew Merkuriev

I remember that in one of his interviews Polunin said: I don't like dance Giselle. I just don't get it. A Noble man pretend to be a peasant? ……

It may be very interesting to see how this show goes on Bolshoi's stage. With Svetlana Zakharova as Giselle and Andrew Merkuriev as Hans, they could certainly help a lot, Polunin wouldn't get better support than this!

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Oh, wow.

Merkuriev and Polunin on the same stage together? My poor heart!

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Polunin is scheduled to dance in at the Vail International Dance Festival in "International Evening of Dance I and II" on

2 August

3 August

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