Jump to content


Wednesday, July 4


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,045 posts

Posted 04 July 2012 - 11:34 AM

Reviews of the English National Ballet at St. Paul's.

The Financial Times

The fascination of the event was the staging of Suite en blanc, Serge Lifar’s splendiferous proclamation about French classical dancing as he shaped it, and here admirably adapted to the exigencies of the temporary stage and responding to St Paul’s acoustic. Maina Gielgud (who knows the piece with as much affection as I bring to writing about it) ordered the choreography and the dance forces with grand skill and sensitivity.


The Evening Standard

Ironically, it’s the two new contemporary works that jar. After a month of watching the bonkers, passionate narrative of Pina Bausch, we need a little more insight into the human condition than couples leaping around in pastel-splash body suits. Van Le Ngoc’s choreography is set to Vivaldi (hard to shake the memory of those car adverts) and although the City Chamber Choir gives an exquisite rendition of John Rutter’s Magnificat for Antony Dowson’s new commission, it’s hard to see what dance adds to the orchestral experience. You long for a site-specific piece.



#2 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,045 posts

Posted 04 July 2012 - 11:40 AM

Photos of the backstage crew preparing at the Saratoga Performing Arts Center for New York City Ballet's summer engagement.

Like a fine dance, the process of moving in and setting up stage props and lighting for the the New York City Ballet takes many hours of carefully coordinated plans.



#3 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,045 posts

Posted 04 July 2012 - 11:41 AM

A piece on "Breaking Pointe" by Kimberly Peterson in The Huffington Post.

From the outside, this world of ballet functions largely as a business, and for this reason, you can see how it may make some sense to keep everyone constantly in competition with their fellow dancers - competition could bring about better performances, more willing and pliable dancers, decreasing tempers and egos and preserving the hierarchy. However, this constant competition also completely destroys the idea of mentorship, of collaborative learning, of positivity. In fact, in business, successful businesses that invest in the people they hire long term are often among the most innovative and cutting edge leaders in their industries. It is surprising that an art form so reliant on the contributions of their employees, would fail to recognize the investment they could be making into their dancers in favor of a competitive atmosphere which erodes the ability for innovation and development.



#4 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,045 posts

Posted 04 July 2012 - 11:43 AM

A preview of Scottish Ballet's new triple bill for its fall season. Video.

Drawing the evening to a close is Hans van Manen’s Five Tangos (1977). Performed by Scottish Ballet for the first time, this sizzling work combines classical ballet with the passion and dramatic flourishes of the tango.



#5 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,045 posts

Posted 04 July 2012 - 11:44 AM

A preview of New York City Ballet's Saratoga performances by Jay Rogoff in The Saratogian.

But Balanchine’s ingenious choreography and NYCB’s world-class dancers dazzle most in this signature work to Bizet’s effervescent music. “Symphony in C” combines to-die-for romanticism—watch for Maria Kowroski’s majesty in the swoony adagio—with a finale to top all finales, all 56 dancers pirouetting and leaping like gods.

Four more Balanchine ballets make welcome returns. In “Firebird” (1949), the legendary fowl helps Prince Ivan triumph over the evil sorcerer Kastchei and marries a princess. Lightning-quick Ashley Bouder and regal Kowroski alternate in contrasting interpretations. Jerome Robbins provided witty dances for Kastchei’s monsters, and the finale’s pageantry, including hordes of children, dramatizes Stravinsky’s thrilling music.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


Help support Ballet Alert! and Ballet Talk for Dancers year round by using this search box for your amazon.com purchases (adblockers may block display):