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Tuesday, July 3


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#1 dirac

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Posted 03 July 2012 - 10:34 AM

A local take on "Breaking Pointe" by Maria Scullo in The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette's blog.

Chartiers Valley grad Allison DeBona and Rex Tilton of Salt Lake City's Ballet West company have had their share. Stars of the CW reality series, "Breaking Pointe," they and their colleagues were filmed for six weeks at all hours of the day, leading up to a final week of performances before the summer break.

The final episode airs Thursday, with hopes high for a second season. So far, the producers have focused a great deal on the two dancers' relationship as friends/maybe more/maybe not, and it's become a popular story line.



#2 dirac

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Posted 03 July 2012 - 10:35 AM

The Imperial Russian Ballet visits South Africa.

The well-known Moscow company of 40 dancers has already been thrilling parts of the country and will go on to Pretoria and Joburg after the Mother City run.

This time, the Imperial Russian Ballet will perform a repertoire that includes Carl Orff’s Carmina Burana, Walpurgis Nacht, the one-act ballet from the opera Faust by Charles Gounod, the grand pas de deux from the ballet Don Quixote by Ludwig Minkus, Adagio from the ballet Scheherazade by Rimsky-Korsakov, and The Can-Can Surprise by Jacques Offenbach.



#3 dirac

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Posted 03 July 2012 - 10:40 AM

A review of Angel Corella's farewell performance by Apollinaire Scherr in The Financial Times.

In recent years, the Spaniard has become a nuanced actor. At this Swan Lakewith Herrera – Corella’s last dance for ABT and final full-length ballet anywhere – I realised for the first time that the prince’s happiness is wedged between burdens: the responsibilities of carrying on the royal line and of freeing Odette from her servitude, and the misery of having betrayed her. The shades of worry and melancholy that now colour his performance bring to mind Corella’s own struggle lately to establish a troupe in a homeland in economic crisis and without deep roots in classical ballet

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#4 dirac

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Posted 03 July 2012 - 10:43 AM

A post on the retirement of Ethan Stiefel - well, sort of -- by Katia Bachko in The New Yorker's blog.

Unlike the masses who first encountered Stiefel in the movie, I was a budding balletomane and had already seen him perform with the A.B.T. a dozen times. I was born in Russia, and ballet was practically my destiny. Like most of my peers, I had the choice of gymnastics, figure skating, or ballet, and since I lacked the derring-do that skating and tumbling required, ballet won. I studied dance in the States, and every spring I went to see A.B.T. at Lincoln Center. The playbills from those shows did not survive a recent purge of childhood memorabilia, but I can safely say that pre-“Center Stage,” Ethan Stiefel barely made an impression on me. Instead, I was smitten with the dark-haired Spaniard Angel Corella, who just retired from the company, at the age of thirty-seven. To see why I swooned, check him out in this flirty Stanton Welch solo, “We Got It Good”—that twinkle in his eye went straight to my heart.



#5 dirac

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Posted 03 July 2012 - 10:52 AM

A review of Isabella Boylston in "Swan Lake" by Andrew Blackmore-Dobbyn in The Huffington Post.

Ironically enough, it isn't easy being an American ballerina at American Ballet Theatre any more. There are few opportunities for the younger dancers to move up with all of the competition from within and from the international guest artists. With the addition of Polina Semionova, who has gone from being a guest artist to joining the stable of great principal dancers of foreign origins, an American girl might feel left out. So many of ABT's current crop of young American dancers are phenomenally talented and are competing for too few performance slots. It's too bad that there's not room for all of them at the top.



#6 dirac

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Posted 03 July 2012 - 10:53 AM

The Royal Conservatoire of Scotland honors Ashley Page.

Ashley Page has been recognised for his decade as artistic director of Scottish Ballet during which they have performed classic shows and won critical awards for their performances.



#7 dirac

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Posted 03 July 2012 - 11:04 AM

Chicago dance news notes by Janet Arvia in the Examiner.

Team player and Joffrey company dancerJeraldine Mendozareceived an award of $50,000 from the prestigious national Leonore Annenberg Fellowship Fund in the Performing and Visual Arts last month. This marks the first time that the Annenberg Fellowship grant has been given to a performing artist in Chicago since the grant’s inception in 2008..................



#8 dirac

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Posted 03 July 2012 - 02:00 PM

A review of American Ballet Theatre in "Le Corsaire" by Mary Cargill for danceviewtimes.

But the audience really wanted to cheer Stiefel, to thank him for so many fine performances. His open-hearted, direct performance style seemed so fresh, and I especially remember his shy sailor in "Fancy Free", with his slightly awkward braggadocio, and his "Apollo", with his brashness tamed by art. He was elegant in abstract roles, as well, and was so effortlessly gracious as the partner in Balanchine's "Allegro Brilliante". There are so many other memories--the unbelievably handsome Solor, his heart breaking in the last act, and the remorseful Albrecht, dancing his heart out, and the poor, deluded Siegfried, so buoyant in the third act. If there is one word to described his dancing, for me it would be honest; there was never anything fussy or finicky about his movement, just clear, unadored dancing; a truly golden performer.



#9 dirac

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Posted 04 July 2012 - 11:37 AM

A review of ABT by Alastair Macaulay in The New York Times.

“Le Corsaire” has as its source Lord Byron’s narrative poem “The Corsair” (1814), which also inspired Verdi to write his opera “Il Corsaro” (1848). My problems with this ballet, and with its immense popularity, may be best illustrated by comparing it with “Il Corsaro.”

That opera is a minor and often conventional work, seldom performed or recorded. Yet I have only to listen to the extraordinary and haunting melody of the heroine Medora’s aria “Non so le tetre immagini” to be plunged deep into the Romantic melancholy that is the essence of Byron’s poem. Beside it, even the very best parts of the ballet’s score are froth.




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