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Friday, June 29


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#1 dirac

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Posted 29 June 2012 - 12:48 PM

Miami City Ballet's executive director resigns abruptly.

Nick Goldsborough, the executive director who was brought in last fall to improve the company’s fundraising and organization, is leaving under circumstances that are still unclear. And staff at the company and the Miami City Ballet school have been told that a cash crisis means they will all receive pay cuts and furloughs.

Goldsborough, reached Friday morning in California, where he had traveled for a family emergency, said he could not comment on his sudden departure.



#2 dirac

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Posted 29 June 2012 - 12:49 PM

A story on the recent visibility of ballet on television and in movies.

But those in the dance world say, give it time — they're simply buoyed by the thought that more people may come to know and appreciate the art of ballet. One of those people is Adam Sklute, a former Joffrey Ballet dancer and now artistic director of Ballet West — the company in "Breaking Pointe."

Sklute notes that ballet had a heyday in the '60s to early '80s. Those were the years of big personalities like Rudolf Nureyev, Margot Fonteyn, and Mikhail Baryshnikov. "But then it calmed down for a few decades," he says. Now, "Black Swan" and the big dancing shows are giving it a new profile.



#3 dirac

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Posted 29 June 2012 - 12:51 PM

Minnesota Ballet sustains damage in a recent flooding.

The Minnesota Ballet was maybe the hardest-hit local arts organization, with an estimated 90 percent of sets and backdrops affected by last week’s flood. On Thursday, the ballet was tending to its most recent original production, “Dracula,” by spreading out warped, molded and otherwise damaged pieces from the set in the lot adjacent to a storage space on Winter Street in Superior.



#4 dirac

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Posted 29 June 2012 - 12:55 PM

A teenaged blogger reviews "Bunheads" for The Huffington Post.

What are the opinions on Bunheads from a Gilmore Girls aficionado, one might inquire? In overall, I enjoyed the premiere episode and will continue to watch the upcoming slew of hourly entertainment. Don't get me wrong here -- I have no interest in any form of dance or ballet in this case, but surprisingly, Sherman-Palladino wove the ballet scenes with such enticing execution that it is difficult not to be bored. For those who cringe with revolting distaste for a "dance-related" show, have no fear; Bunheads is not merely a production revolving around posh pirouettes or sequined tutus, but offers a glimpse into the life of a newly wedded bride as she struggles to decipher her place in the scenic town of Paradise. I was pleasantly surprised at how the premiere episode did not primarily consist of ballet-related scenes, but instead dance shots were often supplemented by Michelle's light-hearted attempts to become a Paradise resident herself.



#5 dirac

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Posted 29 June 2012 - 03:02 PM

A review of Angel Corella's farewell performance by Jocelyn Noveck for Associated Press.

No doubt many in the crowd would have loved to have seen Corella do another Basilio in "Don Quixote" (ABT did not perform that ballet this spring), or another Romeo, or another Ali the Slave in "Le Corsaire." But "Swan Lake" had already been scheduled with one of his favorite longtime partners, Paloma Herrera, and he decided it was the appropriate vehicle for his farewell.

As for Herrera, she seemed emotional all night long in her portrayal of Odette/Odile, as if she was thinking that not only Siegfried but Corella himself would soon be out of her grasp. At the end, she was visibly teary as she became the first of many fellow dancers to proffer her partner a bouquet and a hug.



#6 dirac

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Posted 29 June 2012 - 03:03 PM

How a dancer bamboozled 75 kids into believing they would appear in the closing ceremony of the London Olympics.

The elaborate fraud even duped Earl Spencer, brother of the late Princess Diana - who consented to writing a letter of congratulations to the dancers.

Northampton Crown Court heard yesterday that Moonesamy set up a company The Red, White and Blue Project and approached three dance schools where he signed up the children, aged between nine and 19.



#7 dirac

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Posted 01 July 2012 - 03:44 AM

A report from the Dance Critics Association conference on "Breaking Pointe" by Lindsey and Kathy Adams in The Salt Lake Tribune.

So maybe it shouldn’t come as a surprise that when the annual Dance Critics Association conference convened in New York City last week, the event’s most lively discussion erupted over the drama on "Breaking Pointe." That’s the BBC Worldwide Productions reality show which airs on the CW network and features Ballet West. At a conference panel about dance on television, all eyes were fixed on Adam Sklute, the company’s artistic director.

The refined world of classical ballet has been known to shoot itself in the bunion when it comes to marketing, so it was exciting and shocking to hear Sklute explain why he was willing to risk his company’s reputation at the hands of TV producers. The show "was no different in my mind than producing a brand new ballet, and that’s always a risk," Sklute said. And if the show increases live-performance attendance, "why not use this format?" The statement prompted respected dance critic Robert Johnson of the New Jersey Star-Ledger to break into applause

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#8 dirac

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Posted 01 July 2012 - 03:53 AM

A review of Angel Corella's farewell "Swan Lake" by Mary Cargill in danceviewtimes.

But the evening was really all about memories, and what wonderful ones they were. Corella as the gloriously subservient Ali in "The Corsaire", living only to serve his master, yet tossing off some wonderful corkscrew turns. The first sailor in "Fancy Free", joyful, fun-loving, and so endearing. An innocent Albrecht, swept up by love, who made you think that maybe, just maybe, it would work out this time. And an equally passionate Romeo, eager to love. And of course his comedies--Basilio in "Don Quixote", where his warmth and joy made the final act a love story and not a gyroscope demonstration, and his Colas in Ashton's "La Fille", with his cocky strut. But the memory I think I cherish the most is the Corella of Susan Jaffe's farewell "Giselle", where he played the loyal, honest Wilfred. He was honoring her career and her art, but stayed completely in character, in the background, a thorough professional putting the performance first. But I am glad I got to see his last turns on the Metropolitan stage.




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