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Thursday, June 28


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#1 dirac

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Posted 28 June 2012 - 11:24 AM

A preview of the Paris Opera Ballet in "Giselle" by Sarah Kaufman in The Washington Post.

What resulted is one of the romantic era’s most poignant expressions, the tale of a peasant girl who dies of a broken heart, then returns in spirit form to rescue and forgive her unfaithful lover. Its charms are well known. But let’s look at it from a new perspective. This ballet is more than a show of delicacy, death and tulle. “Giselle” is 19th-century eco-art.



#2 dirac

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Posted 28 June 2012 - 11:26 AM

A Q&A with Frederick Wiseman on his film "La Danse: Le Ballet de l’Opéra de Paris."

IT: After your experience with the Paris Opera Ballet and previously with the American Ballet Theatre for Ballet, do any significant differences stand out to you between ballet in America and ballet in Europe, either in the rehearsal/production process, or the technique itself?

FW: The rehearsal process was quite similar. The major difference is that the Paris Opera Ballet has always received a large annual subsidy from the state while the American Ballet Theatre needs to constantly solicit funds. They are never sure of their annual budget, which is a major obstacle to long term planning.



#3 dirac

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Posted 28 June 2012 - 11:29 AM

A review of the Birmingham Royal Ballet in a mixed bill by Ismene Brown in The Arts Desk.

Faster fields dancers very fetchingly clothed in skin-tight sports outfits by the new young designer Becs Andrews, attractive takes on gymwear, swimwear, cycling bodysuits, basketball sweats and track athletes’ two-pieces, with a lot of long beautiful legs and washboard stomachs on view. It opens as the opening ceremony, athletes in ranks making the ancient salute to the crowds and the gods, while peremptory fanfares arrest our attention, and then Bintley breaks them into an intricate and richly woven carpet of top-speed movement. It has echoes of the multi-screen effects of American modern dance of Twyla Tharp and Merce Cunningham as your eye switches between groups of "athletes", but you keep spotting discreet motifs, the archer girls’ lovely bow-drawn ports de bras, the tae-kwondo’s kick becoming a swift ballet développé.



#4 dirac

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Posted 28 June 2012 - 11:37 AM

American Ballet Theatre's fall season will feature a new work from Alexei Ratmansky.

Set to Symphony No. 9 by Dmitri Shostakovich, the ballet, which will have its world premiere on Oct. 18, will be the first of three new one-act ballets by Mr. Ratmansky to Shostakovich. All three will be presented as an evening-length program during the company’s 2013 spring season at the Metropolitan Opera House. The three works will feature scenery by George Tsypin and costumes by Keso Dekker.



#5 dirac

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Posted 28 June 2012 - 11:44 AM

A review of the Gotham Dance Festival by Carol Pardo for danceviewtimes.

Neither choreographer is unknown to local audiences. Quanz created “Kaleidoscope” for American Ballet Theatre in 2005. Gates danced with the Joffrey Ballet before it became the Joffrey Ballet Chicago. She also danced with the Frankfurt and Pennsylvania Ballets. Now based in Irvine, California she is not as well-known as a choreographer in her old stomping grounds. Yet both were treated with scrupulous equality on the program. Quanz’ works, “In Tandem” and” Luminous,” opened each half, with Gates’ “Delicate Balance” and ”Embellish” following. Each lasted about twenty minutes. Casts ranged from six to twelve dancers, with Gates using the greater number, due to predilection or opportunity. All the music was taped. “Kaleidoscope” indicated that Quanz could dig into a score and knit music and movement into a symbiotic whole, but expectations exist to be upended.



#6 dirac

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Posted 29 June 2012 - 12:53 PM

A story on the retirement of Angel Corella and Ethan Stiefel from American Ballet Theatre by Susan Reiter in The Los Angeles Times.


With Stiefel’s retirement, there remain two Americans (David Hallberg and Cory Stearns) among ABT’s current, highly international roster of 11 male principal dancers. He recently returned from his first season in New Zealand, where he began to expand the repertory, adding ballets by Balanchine, Benjamin Millepied and Larry Keigwin. In November, Stiefel and Johan Kobborg are jointly staging a new Giselle for RNZB, in which Murphy, who divides her time between New York and New Zealand, will appear as the heroine -- her first time taking on that role.



#7 dirac

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Posted 29 June 2012 - 02:57 PM

A review of American Ballet Theatre and New York City Ballet by Deborah Jowitt in her blog.

Balanchine's Rustics come on with props prepared to rehearse the play-within-a-play we never see, while Ashton creates a short, rambunctious dance for his, at the end of which Puck turns Bottom into as ass and sprinkles the sleeping Titania's eyes with the flower juice so she'll love the first living thing she lays eyes on. Both these duets are delicious. ABT's Bottom (Alexei Agoudine—excellent) trots about on black pointe shoes, a fine simulacrum of hooves. NYCB's (Adrian Danchig-Waring—also excellent) has a much better donkey head. The lovely Titanias (NYCB's Maria Kowroski and ABT's Xiomara Reyes) adore their puzzled but happy suitor, supply him with fodder, ride him, or stroke his soft ears before bedding down with him. Instead of the seductive melody Ashton uses, Balanchine sets his comic duet to Mendelssohn's heart-swelling Nocturne.



#8 dirac

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Posted 05 July 2012 - 09:52 AM

A new international treaty extends "economic and moral rights" to performers related to audiovisual performances. Thanks to innopac for sending in the link!


The Beijing Treaty on Audiovisual Performances (13-page / 49KB PDF) was agreed at a World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO) conference in China and provides performers with the exclusive right to control the direct or indirect reproduction of audiovisual works of their performances as well as the "making available to the public of the original and copies of their performances fixed in audiovisual fixations through sale or other transfer of ownership."




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