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Wednesday, June 27


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#1 dirac

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 11:22 AM

A review of the Paris Opera Ballet in 'Giselle' by Sid Smith in The Chicago Tribune.

But Ciaravola is utterly transfixing in Act II, especially when enacting the series of slow-motion arabesques Bart and Polyakov employ to distinguish their Giselle. Sustaining uncanny poise, Ciaravola is lifted and held horizontal by her partner, her arched, overhead and almost grotesquely frozen arm carriage never surrendering an ounce of control or beauty.

Mathieu Ganio, as Albrecht, is striking from the outset, boasting sharp edges, crisply on view with every shift and turn, as if in a movie with his form outlined in glowing magic marker. His long face doesn't make for a natural matinee hero--it monkeys with the plot a bit when the peasant lad Giselle scorns is more of a hottie. But Ganio combines statuesque height with swiftness and buoyancy, culminating in a breathtaking round of hops and entrechats in Act II, soaring toward the ceiling with the propulsion of a NASA rocket and the grace of a gazelle.



#2 dirac

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 11:29 AM

A story on the genesis of Washington Ballet and Imagination Stage's collaborative production of "The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe."

Stanford, who directed the show, said her interpretation draws on the spirituality of the book, which she felt was lacking from the musical theater version. Using two performers to portray each of the four main characters allowed her to “open the main characters up and show the literal journey and the spiritual journey at the same time,” she said. “It’s sort of like how we all live two lives, our walking-through-every-day life and our spiritual life.”

The actor and dancer duos also allow for a greater range of emotion and deeper insight into each character’s thoughts.



#3 dirac

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 11:33 AM

The World Dance Stars Festival commences in Korea this week.

The four-day festival begins this Thursday and features six Korean artists from diverse dance companies based in various locations throughout the world.

Now soloist at the Royal Swedish Ballet, Jun Eun-sun joined the company back in 2002, as its first Asian ballerina.



#4 dirac

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 11:35 AM

A review of the Birmingham Royal Ballet in "Far from the Madding Crowd" by David Bellan in The Oxford Times.

And, of course, Bathsheba Everdene is the catalyst that precipitates the events in this powerful story. It’s important that we feel her sexual power and the strength of her personality. Elisha Willis dances beautifully, but these qualities are lacking in an otherwise well judged performance.

Troy’s jilted fiancé Fanny Robin — Jenna Roberts — who dies with her baby, is very touching in choreography that shows her lovely line as well as her acting ability. This is a long piece — there are two intervals — but Bintley manages to hold our interest most of the time. Perhaps the country dance element should be shortened a little; perhaps Paul Reade’s music is a little heavy at times, but overall this is an admirable work.



#5 dirac

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 11:37 AM

A review of New York City Ballet in "A Midsummer Night's Dream" by Michael Popkin for danceviewtimes.

On opening night, De Luz’s Oberon was also effortless and his character clear. Although he’s light for the Villella scherzo (you’d swear that de Luz’s heels never touched the floor once), he danced with the clearest lines, broke his brisé jumps elegantly at the waist, and finished his turns with ease. Beats were tossed off as grace notes and nothing was forced. His interchanges with Ulbricht’s Puck were good-natured; with Titania, benevolence and mischief underlay his resolve to teach her a lesson. Ulbricht - a natural ham and a powerhouse dancer – also maintained a light touch. The practical jokes never seemed malicious.

In contrast, Veyette’s Oberon on Friday was dramatically blank. Though he finished the elements of his choreography, the dance picture was muddy. He’s relaxed considerably over the past few years and opened in his upper body, but still gave the impression of fighting himself. He’d finish a pair of beats in the air but the landing and transition to the next jump would look like martial arts. The change in the role’s physical tone changed the emotional tone of the whole performance; Suozzi’s Puck was then also largely slapstick.....



#6 dirac

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Posted 28 June 2012 - 11:28 AM

Associated Press story via CBS News on the retirement of Angel Corella from American Ballet Theatre.

Generosity is crucial in a partnership, and Corella says he's most proud of the relationships he formed with his ballerinas. And there were so many, besides Kent: Paloma Herrera, who will be his Odette/Odile on Thursday. Ananiashvili. Alessandra Ferri. Alina Cojocaru, with whom he performed an exquisite "Giselle" last month.

"I would have loved to dance more with Alina," he says of the delicate Romanian phenom. "But whenever I dance with a girl, people say, 'You guys are great together.' I think that's because I try to make it always about HER."



#7 dirac

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Posted 28 June 2012 - 11:31 AM

An interview with Mark Hough, the new executive director of Orlando Ballet.

"We like to say he went into the studio and I went into the office," Hough jokes. But he has serious words of praise for [Robert] Hill's style. "He has come up with a unique signature way of doing the works," Hough says. "He's respectful of the art form of ballet but makes it relevant for the 21st century."

Of course, they're both aware of the traditional checks and balances between an executive director and an artistic director. "He and I sit and talk about the dreams for the future," Hough says. "My job is to make his dreams a reality, and bring a dose of reality to his dreams."



#8 dirac

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Posted 28 June 2012 - 11:40 AM

John Percival is dead at age 85. An obituary for The Guardian by his wife, Judith Cruickshank.

John was a highly independent thinker and his views could be controversial, bringing him into conflict with the dance establishment. But his opinions were expressed honestly and backed by long experience. He was always open to new ideas. His concern was to write clearly and well and to communicate his enthusiasm for the best of the art form. He was appointed MBE for services to dance in 2002.



#9 dirac

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Posted 28 June 2012 - 11:42 AM

Doris Singleton, dancer and actor, has died at age 92.

After performing as a featured dancer with the American Ballet Theater in her teens, the Brooklyn-born Dorthea Singleton began in showbiz as a vocalist with Art Jarrett's orchestra in the late 1930s. Her distinctive voice led to a career in radio, where she was an actress on "The Whistler" and other shows during WWII, performing at times with the likes of George Burns & Gracie Allens, Bob Hope and Jack Benny. Singleton met Lucille Ball in the late 1940s during a performance of the radio show "My Favorite Husband"; a few years later, Ball invited Singleton to join the cast of TV's "I Love Lucy" as Carolyn Appleby.




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