Neryssa

Tanaquil Le Clercq: the film?

28 posts in this topic

Just when I thought things had quieted down with the novel - a film?: http://www.tannyfilm.com/

At least it will be a documentary, supposedly and Martin Scorsese is an advisor: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2381319/ P.S. Nancy Reynolds is a consultant, hurray!

N.

I love the IMDB entry -- Jerome Robbins and George Balanchine are listed as "stars!"

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Just when I thought things had quieted down with the novel - a film?: http://www.tannyfilm.com/

At least it will be a documentary, supposedly and Martin Scorsese is an advisor: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2381319/ P.S. Nancy Reynolds is a consultant, hurray!

N.

I love the IMDB entry -- Jerome Robbins and George Balanchine are listed as "stars!"

Isn't it wonderful? I am sure that this documentary will include archival material and great photographs!

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Isn't it wonderful? I am sure that this documentary will include archival material and great photographs!

Yes! Absolutely wonderful. I am thrilled that this is happening.

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I haven't seen any of the other films the director has worked on -- is anyone here familiar with her work?

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More good news as I noticed that the co-producer is Ric Burns - brother of Ken Burns excl.png

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More good news as I noticed that the co-producer is Ric Burns - brother of Ken Burns excl.png

I saw that -- I like his doc about the Statue of Liberty very much.

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[isn't it wonderful? I am sure that this documentary will include archival material and great photographs!

Let's hope this is one of the rare NYCB documentaries in which rigidities over permissions, rights and pay-offs are resolved.

A friend who taught a master class of students in the capital of a southern state asked those participating how many had heard of Balanchine. Only two responded "yes." Let's hope that Le Clercq and her incredible story -- conveyed through images not usually available to filmmakers -- will help change that.

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More good news as I noticed that the co-producer is Ric Burns - brother of Ken Burns excl.png

I saw that -- I like his doc about the Statue of Liberty very much.

Ric Burns's New York documentary is one of the best I've ever seen.

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I really hope the NYCB releases some of the archival footage of LeClercq because from what I've seen, she was an incredible dancer. Her final movement of Western Symphony would drop jaws today.

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[isn't it wonderful? I am sure that this documentary will include archival material and great photographs!

Let's hope this is one of the rare NYCB documentaries in which rigidities over permissions, rights and pay-offs are resolved.

A friend who taught a master class of students in the capital of a southern state asked those participating how many had heard of Balanchine. Only two responded "yes." Let's hope that Le Clercq and her incredible story -- conveyed through images not usually available to filmmakers -- will help change that.

Didn't they release footage for the American Masters documentary on Balanchine? What about the Jerome Robbins' archive? Also, Le Clercq left an archive. There is not a lot of footage available of her dancing, is there? There was a nice profile about her on the American Masters' program on Robbins. She really deserves a documentary.

I really don't understand the rights/permissions issues but if Nancy Reynolds is involved then I am hopeful.

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You are right, Neryssa, about the American Masters documentary on Balanchine, though the clips are few and rather short compared to what is available. Much archival footage can be viewed at the Dance Collection and other libraries, but one must physically be there to access it, as far as I understand.

Digital distribution for Balanchine (and Robbins) and the NYCB seem to me to be much less than for other choreographers and companies. The challenge for documentary film-makers is daunting. A "dance documentary" without extensive video footage has a huge handicap.

Like you, I found myself hoping that Nancy Reynolds' involvement will mean greater access.

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A friend pointed out that none of the clips in the American Masters Balanchine documentary exceeded 60 seconds, apparenly the standard for audio/video fair use. I hope that for this project, rights holders grant permissions for longer excerpts.

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A friend pointed out that none of the clips in the American Masters Balanchine documentary exceeded 60 seconds, apparenly the standard for audio/video fair use. I hope that for this project, rights holders grant permissions for longer excerpts.

That's not true even if you are only referring to clips of Le Clercq: There was a longish clip of Le Clercq in Western Symphony unless you omit the seconds when Jacques d'Amboise is dancing his solos without Le Clercq. What about the other ballets profiled in that program?

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I am also glad it's happening, but we have to consider that this film will be putting out the hat to raise funds, and right now, there's really not enough to go all around. I hope that films like "In Balanchine's Classroom," will not lose out.

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A friend pointed out that none of the clips in the American Masters Balanchine documentary exceeded 60 seconds, apparenly the standard for audio/video fair use. I hope that for this project, rights holders grant permissions for longer excerpts.

There isn't a great deal of footage available on Tanny, certainly not available to the public, but there is fairly tangible evidence that there is more under wraps as it were, in the NY Public Library and Jerome Robbins Library collections (as mentioned in this thread: http://balletalert.invisionzone.com/index.php?/topic/28838-tanaquil-le-clercq/

La Valse (in many ways Le Clercq's signature role) is apparently on film:

http://www.worldcat.org/title/valse/oclc/438155528

Note the documentary website is at this URL as well, and there's some actual project info on this page:

http://derekbritt.com/?portfolio=afternoon-of-a-faun

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A CANDLE FOR ST. JUDE was released, at least, at one point for however long such videos are released, on videocassette. maybe Beta but also, if mem. serves, also VHS.

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Thanks, RG.

I'm also sure that most readers here are aware of the film of Le Clercq/D'Amboise dancing Robbins' Afternoon of a Faun, as part of the VAI DVD The Art of the Pas de Deux, Part 3.

Edited to add:

VAI also released said pdd in the D'Amboise compilation, Portrait of a Great American Dancer.

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Didn't Balanchine choreograph Le Clercq in Cinderella in the late 1940s for television? I hope Nancy Buirski and Ric Burns are able to release their documentary earlier than later this year. I have been waiting for it all my life.

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CINDERELLA

Made for Television

Music: By Peter Ilyitch Tchaikovsky (excerpts from Symphonies Nos. 1 [1866, revised 1874] and 2 [1872, revised 1879]; adagio from Symphony No. 3 [1875]).

Choreography: By George Balanchine.

Production: Produced by Paul Belanger.

Cast: Cinderella, Tanaquil Le Clercq; Fairy, Jimmy Savo; Ugly Sisters, Ruth Sobotka, Pat McBride; Prince, Herbert Bliss; corps de ballet.

First Telecast:April 25, 1949, Through the Crystal Ball, CBS.

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There was also a one-hr TV version of Coppelia ca 1952, starring Le Clercq, but with an odd title that I do not recall.

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I think there is another thread somewhere about this but darned if I can find it. Anyway, the producers have just posted a trailer:

http://youtu.be/yKlzD3YFEAw

The credits say it is sponsored by PBS and WNET and American Masters. Does anyone know when it's supposed to air?

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Thanks for that, phrank. Seeing d'Amboise, Ash, and others who knew and danced with Le Clercq, will be wonderful. I like the title, "Afternoon of a Faun." The Faun is usually the boy. Here the Fawn, of course, will be LeClercq. Every memoir of NYC in that era (those that include her) paints a fascinating and admiring picture. A regret of mine is that, if I ever saw her dance, I was too young and untutored to know who she was.

Carbro writes:

A friend pointed out that none of the clips in the American Masters Balanchine documentary exceeded 60 seconds, apparently the standard for audio/video fair use. I hope that for this project, rights holders grant permissions for longer excerpts.

One of the problems about obtaining permissions is that it is burdensome even to determine, let alone get in touch with, those who might conceivably HAVE a claim to rights. This includes unions, reps of choreographers, photographers, designers, heirs, etc. Then there are the legal costs.

The budgets of documentaries like this -- even if part of the American Masters franchise -- rarely go that far.

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