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Monday, June 18


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#1 dirac

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Posted 18 June 2012 - 09:32 AM

A review of a new documentary on Nureyev, Baryshnikov, and Acosta by Ismene Brown for The Arts Desk.

Bragg’s interviews with all three, dating back to 1991 in Nureyev's case, discovered little in common between them except for their news-making emigrations, and we were left no wiser about what their past training particularly contributed to their lustre nor what they passed on to other male dancers.

But the programme did unwittingly expose how the British view of male dancers now has subtly altered, along with the dismantling of barriers and mystique between men and women in our society. Rojo said that "when a male dancer captures the public it's usually because he's outrageous, and so it should be. His dance is usually more abandoned and wild." It was evidently true of Nureyev in the clips and interviews - a magnetic, restive character seen in his last years, naked on his Caribbean island, gilding his self-image as an innately isolated soul.



#2 dirac

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Posted 18 June 2012 - 09:34 AM

A review of "An Intimate Evening with Anna Pavlova" by Zoe Anderson in The Independent.

Dowell, former dancer and former director of The Royal Ballet, makes a genial host, slipping from narrator to actor and even doing a little dancing. There’s a nice sense of atmosphere, with the stage framed by chamber musicians on one side, and a recreation of Pavlova’s dressing room on the other. Dancers of The Royal Ballet perform numbers associated with Pavlova, with Ursula Hageli acting the ballerina in staged scenes from her life.



#3 dirac

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Posted 18 June 2012 - 09:49 AM

A review of Richmond Ballet by Zoe Anderson in The Independent.

Richmond Ballet, the state ballet of Virginia, USA, made its international debut with easy grace. This is a very likeable company, with dancers who share a fluent classical style and warm stage presence. Individual dancers stand out, distinctive personalities with strong technique.


Balanchine’s Valse Fantaisie is a bright showcase, danced to bouncy music by Glinka. Women in pink skim into formal patterns, with one man partnering the central woman. It’s the kind of work that’s harder than it looks, easily spoiled by tension or nerves. The Richmond dancers float through it. Arms and torsos flow and curve without a hitch; footwork sparkles neatly. Valerie Tellmann and Thomas Garrett are confident as the leading couple


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#4 dirac

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Posted 18 June 2012 - 09:51 AM

A listing of New York studios that offer ballet-themed workouts.

Tonight, the second episode of ABC Family's new show Bunheads will air, and if you didn't see the first one you can check out a clip below (or watch the full episode on Hulu). It's basically Gilmore Girls but with a ballet twist—in fact, the show's creator is Amy Sherman-Palladino, and Kelly Bishop (aka Emily Gilmore) is one of the leads. The series is based around a troupe of young ballet students in small town Oregon—and since it's shaping up to be a hit, you know that women and men everywhere will be seeking out where to channel their inner-bunhead. With that, we present a few places in New York City where you won't feel intimidated learning the ropes barres.



#5 dirac

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Posted 18 June 2012 - 10:29 AM

The Joffrey Ballet will be the subject of a PBS American Masters program.

The special will cover the story of the first quintessentially American dance company founded by Robert Joffrey and Gerald Arpino, who pioneered a new dance philosophy.



#6 dirac

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Posted 18 June 2012 - 10:32 AM

A review of the English National Ballet by Lloyd Bradford Syke for Crikey.com.

The ENB has certainly embraced the pared-back approach which was part-and-parcel of this derivative of the 19th-century Russian imperial school, inasmuch as there are no fancypants cossies (Omo-white is de rigour) and the only semblance of a set is a starkly black metal stair. This leaves making an impression to the dance. And dancers. Both not only succeed, but exceed. Principal, Vadim Muntagirov, looks like he was born to dance this role which, for all its modernity in terms of theatrical spareness, demands en pointe precision in the highest and an ‘unbearable lightness of being’. He’s man of the moment in the ballet world because of his twinkle-toed agility, grace and elegant line. He’s long, lean and squeaky-clean in execution. As Apollo, he’s the quintessential incarnation of the ideal of the kouros, the smooth-skinned, athletic youth and shines as brightly as the sun over which, among other things, his character is deemed to prevail.



#7 dirac

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Posted 19 June 2012 - 01:03 PM

A review of the gala performance of the Boston International Ballet Competition by Jeffrey Gantz in The Boston Globe.

At last year’s gala, New York City Ballet principals Jennie Somogyi and Charles Askegard made a guest appearance in Sappington’s “Entwined.” Askegard returned to perform the same piece with American Ballet Theatre soloist Misty Copeland, but this generic duet didn’t improve on further acquaintance. The other pair of special guests, Boston Ballet soloists Whitney Jensen and Paulo Arrais, were more engrossing in a piece by Arrais called “Work in Progress.” The 2011 silver medalist in the senior men’s division, Andile Ndlovu, was also back to perform his own riveting “The Art of War.”



#8 dirac

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Posted 19 June 2012 - 01:11 PM

A review of American Ballet Theatre by Carol Pardo for danceviewtimes.

The afternoon began with Christopher Wheeldon’s “Thirteen Diversions.” Wheeldon’s choreography for the corps is the star of the show, animating the stage and providing contrasting texture to the soloists’ dances. Misty Copeland, in what was intended to be her debut (an emergency earlier in the week moved it up) showed how much she has grown. Her dancing had a variety of attack that kept it interesting. And her final duet, partnered by Gray Davis, had real weight and authority. It would be instructive to see “Thirteen Diversions” on a smaller stage, but it would be even more revelatory to see this program again. Let’s hope that happens—and soon.



#9 dirac

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Posted 19 June 2012 - 01:12 PM

A review of Pacific Northwest Ballet in "Coppelia" by Helene Kaplan for danceviewtimes.

Kaori Nakamura's mime was crystal clear and read naturally from both the front and back of the house; it blended seamlessly into the dance. Her dancing was technically dazzling, and her phasing intelligent, musical, and full of grace notes; both looked effortless and inevitable. What sets her apart is not only how intelligently and logically she phrases each piece of choreography, but how she created a dramatic arc from section to section and act to act, straight to the climatic Act III pas de deux. Jonathan Porretta was her Franz, carried away more by infectious affection than pure folly. As much as he's known for his virtuosity, the most impressive part of his dancing was the Bournonville-like section of changing weight shifts and directions in the Act I variation, the core of the role made for Danish-trained Helgi Tomasson, and he danced it with aplomb. Because Nakamura and Porretta are not often partners, when they are, it's a joy to see how simpatico they are. After their wedding pas de deux, there was a collective sigh before the ovation.




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