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Sunday, June 17


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#1 Mme. Hermine

Mme. Hermine

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Posted 17 June 2012 - 11:14 AM

Clement Crisp reviews the Royal Ballet for the Financial Times:

http://www.ft.com/in...l#axzz1y4zMcfgz

Nothing denies the ballet’s past: Bournonville productions, once lovingly honoured in Copenhagen, now often seem travesties of their originals since “revising” Bournonville has become a national sport there. To Kobborg’s huge credit, this Sylphide guards that mysterious and all-too-evanescent bloom that is Romanticism’s balletic self.



#2 Mme. Hermine

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Posted 17 June 2012 - 11:17 AM

Reviews of the Australian Ballet.

The New York Times

Other disappointments, however, lay ahead. Perhaps the most obvious one is that with this production as its calling card, the Australian Ballet, currently celebrating its 50th anniversary, is not serious about wanting to be a serious classical ballet company. The opening-up and opening-out of the body that is basic to ballet’s classicism doesn’t really occur here; women dance on point but with arms folding in to express inhibitions. The step most famously associated with “Swan Lake,” the ballerina’s multiple fouetté turns, does occur, and more or less to the right music, though as a depiction of rage and frustration.


The New York Post

The dancers are hardworking and beautifully schooled. The tiny Madeleine Eastoe as Odette and curly haired Kevin Jackson as her prince survived this marathon, though most of the repertory was mediocre. And at Tuesday’s opening program, a mixed bill, Stanton Welch’s “Divergence” was so awful it was wonderful.


The Huffington Post

I wanted to like the dancers who bravely navigated these rough seas. And I did like many of them. TAB's dancers are on the whole clean and polished, free of fussy mannerisms. They present themselves in an appealingly unshowy way. Most of the cast of Luminous looked nervous, a little wooden, as if performing in a competition. I'm sure there were real nerves involved -- it's not just American audiences who've been eagerly anticipating this tour. But Daniel Gaudiello, in Favorita, impressed with his spring-loaded jump and natural command of the stage, and delicate, elegant Amber Scott, the company's reigning ballerina, enchanted in Molto Vivace.




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