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Wednesday, May 30


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#1 dirac

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Posted 30 May 2012 - 10:44 AM

A story on the Robert Ivey Ballet Company almost a year after the death of its founder.

Wise points out that when Ivey first started the ballet company, they performed full-length classicals. Only when it got harder for Ivey to teach and choreograph did he start allowing others to guest teach in choreographic styles like jazz and hip-hop. The company slowly started shifting away from the classical foundation and toward a contemporary one. The Wises have taken their leadership roles during this transitional phase as an opportunity to bring the Robert Ivey Ballet back to its classical foundation, which they discussed with the company's director before he passed.



#2 dirac

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Posted 30 May 2012 - 10:45 AM

A review of American Ballet Theatre by Robert Johnson in The Star-Ledger.

The Albrechts are wonderful, too, from Cory Stearns, who plays him as an oily seducer, to Herman Cornejo, a dancer of ardent clarity. Ever the attentive partner, Marcelo Gomes relies too much on his natural charisma.

The Hilarions are all different: Sascha Radetsky makes Giselle’s rejected suitor gruff but bashful; Patrick Ogle has a menacing, physical authority; Gennadi Saveliev’s huntsman scans the scene with an acute gaze.



#3 dirac

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Posted 30 May 2012 - 10:47 AM

A story on "Breaking Pointe" by Carole Mikita for The Deseret News.

Cameras followed the company for six weeks through its rehearsals for this spring’s production of George Balanchine’s “Emeralds.” Cameras also captured what happens when the curtain comes down for 10 dancers.

Allison DeBona, a demi-soloist, said, “They followed us into our homes and into our personal lives, and at first, it’s kind of hard to let them in, but you become very familiar with people who you’re working with and the cameras, and sooner rather than later you realize, you really are being yourself.”



#4 dirac

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Posted 30 May 2012 - 11:06 AM

Guillaume Côté blogs for The Huffington Post.

I am also choreographing a piece for Greta Hodgkinson and four of my male colleagues, Keiichi Hirano, Etienne Lavigne, Patrick Lavoie and Christopher Stalzer, to Maurice Ravel's Bolero. It's turning out to be quite challenging. For those unfamiliar with Ravel's piece, it's very repetitive -- 15 minutes with one melody played over and over -- and the incredible thing is that Ravel makes it work superbly. It's truly a genius piece of music and I hope the choreography can match its power. The creation is almost done but it's hard to find a time that everyone is available to rehearse. We aren't really ready yet but I guess staying calm and cool is the only way to go.



#5 dirac

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Posted 30 May 2012 - 02:18 PM

A review of American Ballet Theatre in "The Bright Stream" by Brian Seibert in The New York Times.

This Beaumarchais material is much older than 1936, as are most of the jokes. But Mr. Ratmansky and Ballet Theater make everything fresh. Much of the humor comes from the funny things the choreographer hears in the music; American jazz moves have reached this part of the Caucasus. The score is eminently danceable, and Mr. Ratmansky responds with a bumper crop of dance ideas without ever letting the plot drag.

Appropriately for the setting, the division of the labor of entertaining is spread around so evenly that the normal ballet hierarchies recede. In this ballet the motto “from each according to his ability” doesn’t quite apply: everyone in the cast seems to show off greater abilities than usual.



#6 dirac

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Posted 30 May 2012 - 02:19 PM

A review of the Bolshoi Ballet in "Coppelia" by Alastair Macaulay in The New York Times.

At the Kennedy Center on Tuesday, I marveled more than ever at the felicities of Léo Delibes’s 1870 score, with the Bolshoi’s Igor Dronov conducting the Kennedy Center Opera House Orchestra. One part of the Act I mazurka is underscored by an amazing series of brass staccati I had never noticed before; when Coppélius is waylaid by a group of male villagers, the laughter in the strings is brilliant.

And the Bolshoi company dances to music with a greater immediacy than Russia’s other leading troupe, the Mariinsky Ballet of St. Petersburg. Tuesday’s cast was led by Nina Kaptsova as the prank-playing heroine, Swanilda; Artem Ovcharenko as her boyfriend, Frantz; and Alexey Loparevich as the doll maker Coppélius.



#7 dirac

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Posted 30 May 2012 - 02:23 PM

A society pages item on New York City Ballet's spring gala in The Palm Beach Daily News.

Natalie Portman was honorary chairwoman, with Emily Blavatnik, Charlotte Moss and Marie Nugent-Head serving as chairwomen. Len Blavatnik, Barry Friedberg and James C. Marlas were chairmen. Pamela Baxter, Marlene Hess, Julia Koch, Carol Mack and Nadja Swarovski were vice chairwomen.



#8 dirac

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Posted 30 May 2012 - 02:26 PM

Orlando Ballet gets a grant from Disney.

More than 137 organizations, schools and groups that promote children's well-being applied for the grants. Recipients were chosen by a 15-member committee consisting of Disney cast members, community leaders and educators.



#9 dirac

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Posted 31 May 2012 - 11:13 AM

A preview of the Bolshoi Ballet in "Swan Lake" by Paul Hodgins in The Orange County Register.

"It will be spectacular," said company spokeswoman Katya Novikova of the famous boy-meets-swan story with the tragic ending. "Altogether we are touring with 130 people. You will see more than 100 dancers, and it will be accompanied by a full orchestra."

Gathering forces of that size for any ballet is a rare event, Novikova said. "It is very, very costly. We couldn't possibly pay for it with ticket sales alone."



#10 dirac

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Posted 31 May 2012 - 11:14 AM

A review of the Bolshoi in "Coppelia" by Sarah Kaufman in The Washington Post.

This new staging of “Coppelia,” by Sergei Vikharev, premiered in 2009, based on how Marius Petipa and Enrico Cecchetti retooled the original French version (by Arthur Saint-Leon) for Russian dancers. Seen here for the first time in this country, it’s an extraordinary achievement, full of color and life and the feeling of something newly minted. Everything about it seems fresh, from the shimmering Delibes score to the dancers’ energy — you want to stomp along with their mazurka — and the crisp fabrics of the folkloric costumes, inspired by the festive attire of what was known as Galicia, a region overlapping Poland and Ukraine.



#11 dirac

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Posted 03 June 2012 - 04:30 PM

Richmond Ballet will perform in London and Washington.

The Kennedy Center's 2012-2013 season includes the Richmond Ballet, which will perform in the Opera House as part of the Ballet Across America III, a series celebrating the country's regional companies. The Richmond Ballet will dance on a program with Oregon Ballet Theatre and the Boston Ballet.




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