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Tuesday, May 29


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#1 dirac

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Posted 29 May 2012 - 12:12 PM

A feature on Miko Fogarty, one of the young dancers featured in "First Position."

"I have to keep my turns working; my jumps land hard, so I need to slow those down; and my balance, I try to work on that whenever I have time. Then there's extension, so I keep stretching," she says.

This, from a girl who can easily split her legs beyond 180 degrees while doing a grand jeté (a long horizontal jump) and rest, while perching on the toes of one foot and bending her torso in half to meet her arabesque leg -- which rises behind her like so much origami.



#2 dirac

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Posted 29 May 2012 - 12:14 PM

A review of American Ballet Theatre in "La Bayadere" by Margaret Fuhrer in The Huffington Post.

And yet -- how brilliant these young dancers might be someday! Boylston, Copeland and Seo are all blessed with extraordinary facility. Seo in particular has the sort of gorgeous line you could just drown in, plush and luxurious. Boylston, a confident performer, has a huge, explosive jump. Of the three, only Copeland really knows how to command the stage. She has mastered Gamzatti's considerable technical challenges, but you don't see her thinking about them as she dances. Her Gamzatti is cunning and feline, more than a little desperate, always just about to erupt. The other two dancers are straight-A students -- they've done their homework, and know exactly how everything should look -- but seem overly self-conscious onstage. I think they just need time to relax into these roles, to familiarize themselves with the spotlight. (Maybe promoting them to principals would help?)



#3 dirac

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Posted 29 May 2012 - 12:16 PM

A preview of the "All Stars of Dance" gala by Matthew J. Palm in The Orlando Sentinel.

Several other choreographers will also offer new works, including Edgar Anido and Viktor Plotnikov.

Christopher Wheeldon will debut a new work, danced by Joan Boada. A principal dancer with San Francisco Ballet, Boada will make his first performance in Orlando.
Of course, the winners of the World Ballet Competition will also be performing.



#4 dirac

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Posted 29 May 2012 - 12:17 PM

Q&A with Miye Bishop of Northwest Ballet.

Q: How did you first become involved with the world of ballet, both as a dancer and as a choreographer?
A: I've always been around ballet because of my father, whose whole life evolved around ballet, but when I was younger I didn't have the interest or the discipline to start dancing especially under my father's direction. It wasn't until my family went to Vancouver, B.C., to watch a company perform "Sleeping Beauty," and being pulled into the ballet just before the show started. It was just a simple character role, but I was taken backstage to be fitted for a costume and make-up, in the same room as professional dancers who were all breaking in their pointe shoes and lifting their foot past their head.



#5 dirac

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Posted 29 May 2012 - 12:21 PM

Viengsay Valdes and Osiel Gouneo perform at the the gala of the Rudolf Nureyev International Classic Ballet Festival.

Upon her return to Havana, she announced, she will participate in the La Huella de España Festival on June 2, and on June 8 she will perform in the Electra Garrido ballet, premiered in 1986 by Ofelia Gonzalez and Loipa Araujo.



#6 dirac

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Posted 29 May 2012 - 12:23 PM

A story on Utah ballet student Sarah Mohalley.


Mohalley has more than an hour of lessons every day and spends most of her weekends working on dance pieces. She sometimes comes to class with her feet taped up to hide the effects of hours of dance on her toes. "I spend pretty much all my time in the studio," she said.

Last summer, her studies brought her to Russia to dance with the Bolshoi Ballet Academy. "It's one of the world's oldest, greatest ballet companies," Mohalley said. "I still don't even believe that I got to do that."



#7 dirac

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Posted 30 May 2012 - 10:40 AM

A story on the new Ballet West reality show, "Breaking Pointe," by Rebecca Milzoff in The New York Times.

Getting “Breaking Pointe” off the ground proved to be a lengthy process. Casting producers considered about 15 ballet schools, including those of the San Francisco Ballet, the Boston Ballet and Juilliard, before narrowing the pool down to a final three. Ballet West’s prestige and social structure — with only 40 dancers and a relatively isolated setting in Salt Lake City, the company is extremely tight-knit — were key selling points.

“We knew we were getting a certain quality of dancer, and also a pressure cooker environment front and center,” Ms. Vadas said of choosing Ballet West, which is 49 years old and widely considered one of the top regional companies in the United States. “We really wanted to capture not only the intense beauty and sacrifice of the actual dance part of it, but, for the CW audience, more of the soap opera element.”



#8 dirac

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Posted 30 May 2012 - 10:42 AM

A review of American Ballet Theatre in "La Bayadere" by Alastair Macaulay in The New York Times.

Ivan Vasiliev, though not tall, is total testosterone. When he played Solor on Thursday, we didn’t need telling about that tiger: His energy, his stance, his weight had already said so much within a few seconds. In what followed, his leaps were astounding, his turns radiated force, and he covered more space in circuits of jumps than anyone else. He suddenly took the breath away with the urgency of a couple of deep-arching backbends on bended knee, especially at the end of a variation.

Of the five Solors I saw, none were more smolderingly infatuated by the heroine, Nikiya (Alina Cojocaru in his case), or more honorably conflicted by his obligatory betrothal to the Rajah’s daughter, Gamzatti (Misty Copeland). He’s not the most polished dancer before the public today, but as long as he’s in the right role, that is part of his charm: Do we ask a tiger killer to dance like a poet or a milord?



#9 dirac

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Posted 30 May 2012 - 02:14 PM

An essay on Noel Streatfeild's "Ballet Shoes" reprinted by Tobi Tobias on her blog.

According to Streatfeild’s world picture, which has a great deal of literal and poetic truth in it, being an orphan is the ideal condition for the budding artist. It leaves the field clear of encumbrances of all kinds. Such a creature doesn’t have to follow in anyone’s footsteps, waste chunks of her adolescence rebelling against the ancestors, or conform to familial expectations. She’s free to become self-made. In a simple fantasy, Streatfeild embodied the concept of self-actualization—the artist’s essential task, after all—decades before New Age types made so much ado about its importance. Revealingly, the sisters’ “family” disbands in the book’s whirlwind denouement. Once the support system is no longer needed and would, indeed, be confining, it splits open like a cocoon to permit the fledgling performers and their aeronautically inclined sister to embark upon their careers.



#10 dirac

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Posted 30 May 2012 - 02:22 PM

A review of the Da Camera Society and American Contemporary Ballet by Laura Bleiberg in The Los Angeles Times' blog.

In spite of this imbalance, Music + Dance: L.A. had the power of intimacy and instinctual coupling in its favor. Live music is a rare commodity at dance performances, making this a worthwhile idea to pursue.
American Contemporary Ballet's artistic director, Lincoln Jones, choreographed two abstract pieces, both reflecting the neo-classical style of George Balanchine. Indeed, Jones was channeling “Apollo” in his piece to Igor Stravinsky’s Serenade in A. Jones created a jazzy dance to this solo piano work, choreographing flexed feet and hands, thrusting hips and rhythmically complex pizzicato for dancers Zsolt Banki, Marie Buser, Theresa Farrell and Regina Park Suh.



#11 dirac

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Posted 01 June 2012 - 10:52 AM

A story on the founders of West Australian Ballet, James Penberthy and Kira Bousloff.

The couple, both divorced, married and began an artistic relationship that would see them move to Perth - she as a ballet dancer and teacher, he as a composer.

Over the next 20 years the couple would enlarge the experience of the arts for West Australians, starting with the 1952 foundation of the WA Ballet, a largely self-funded body until official government support in 1969.




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