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Works & Process: Doug Fullington's "After Petipa"


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#1 Helene

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Posted 07 May 2012 - 09:51 PM

This has been discussed piecemeal in other forums, but I wanted to post a heads up that Doug Fullington will be presenting "After Petipa" this Sunday and Monday 13-14 May at the Guggenheim as part of it's "Works & Process" series.

According to the Guggenheim website, Sunday night is sold out, but there are still tickets for Monday. The presentation will be screened via web. Here is the PNB press release, with details:

Works & Process, the performing arts program at the Guggenheim to live stream
PACIFIC NORTHWEST BALLET – AFTER PETIPA

Tune in at www.ustream.tv/worksandprocess
7:30 pm EDT (4:30 pm Pacific)
Sunday, May 13 and Monday, May 14, 2012

“The Best Way To Get Smart About Dance”
– The Village Voice

“An exceptional opportunity to understand something of the creative process.”
– The New York Times

For over 27 years and in over 350 productions, Works & Process has offered New York audiences unprecedented access to our generation’s leading creators and performers. Each 80-minute performance uniquely combines artistic creation and stimulating conversation and takes place in the Guggenheim’s intimate Frank Lloyd Wright-designed 285-seat Peter B. Lewis Theater. With both nights sold out in advance, Works & Process has announced that it will live stream the May 13 and 14 performances of Pacific Northwest Ballet – After Petipa.

Many ballets are credited with choreography “after Petipa,” but what does that mean? In After Petipa, Pacific Northwest Ballet’s Education Programs Manager and dance historian Doug Fullington and company dancers take a fascinating look at three famous classical duets—the Black Swan pas de deux from Swan Lake, and the Blue Bird pas de deux and Grand pas de deux from The Sleeping Beauty—to explore how they have evolved over time. Pacific Northwest Ballet’s Artistic Director Peter Boal will introduce the program on Sunday, May 13.

To watch the live broadcasts of these performances, visit www.ustream.tv/worksandprocess on Sunday, May 13 and/or Monday, May 14 at 7:30 pm EDT (4:30 pm Pacific). Follow the conversation on Twitter with @WorksandProcess and #WPlive. For more information, visit www.worksandprocess.org.

Made possible with the assistance of Arlene C. Cooper.

PANEL: Doug Fullington, PNB Education Programs Manager

PERFORMERS:
Carla Körbes, Principal
Seth Orza, Principal
James Moore, Soloist
Sarah Ricard Orza, Soloist
Jerome Tisserand, Soloist
Leta Biasucci, Corps de ballet


Joan Acocella wrote a (physical) column about the presentation in "The New Yorker", but it's only available to subscribers. There was another mention of the program in "Goings on about Town: Dance" in the magazine (dated 14 May):

“WORKS & PROCESS”/PACIFIC NORTHWEST BALLET

This excellent troupe, led by the former N.Y.C.B. star Peter Boal, returns to the Guggenheim. With the help of Doug Fullington, the company’s in-house ballet historian, the dancers will reveal how certain repertory favorites—such as the Bluebird pas de deux from “Sleeping Beauty”—have evolved, from their creation in the late nineteenth century to the present day. Both sessions are sold out, but the shows can be seen at ustream.tv/worksandprocess. (Fifth Ave. at 89th St. 212-423-3587. May 13-14 at 7:30.)


Note that the website does not list the Monday show as being sold out; more tickets may have been released between publication of this note and today.



#2 Helene

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 12:08 PM

Pointe Magazine online has an interview with Doug Fullington with four excellent questions:
http://www.pointemag...volution-ballet

#3 Paul Parish

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Posted 13 May 2012 - 05:27 PM

Scrappy notes
Legat's variation was pretty wonderful.
Much of interest in this, though the transmission was very choppy, terrible, in fact -- disrupted very frequently, and it stopped for a full 60 seconds at one point, on TOP of which the commercials would burst in right at any time, of course at the peak of a dance.

So I'm not sure what I learned -- I did not see any bourrees for the man in the bluebird coda, which I THINK he asked us to notice -- the Bluebird DID do chaines, could that be what Doug was talking about?

I DID like to see the ballerina dance a ring around her man. Seemed to be wedding-magic to me.

Gold and sapphire variations deadly boring -- no wonder they got cut.

Well, lecture demos are always kinda drab. Antoinette Sibley danced Florine SO much better than that, the whole body alive and aflutter. Korbes was lovely most of the time. They all had some good moments - the developpes a la seconde instead of the fish dives were surprisingly effective -- but it's very hard to judge how to take any emendation....

And i'm pretty certain that in 1895 the black swan 's adage did not have supported grands jetes a la seconde at 90 degrees -- those were glissades. 90 to nothing.

#4 Helene

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Posted 13 May 2012 - 05:36 PM

I thought it was my Wifi. I missed the beginning through the Florine variation rebooting my computer, and finally went to the wired laptop, where there were only a few interruptions until the end. (The commercial only came up again after I clicked the "Popout" button.

The stage is very small, making the two stages that SFB used during the War Memorial seismic renovation look huge. Most dancers look like they're marking a bit there in every presentation I've attended live or seen streamed.

#5 EricHG31

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Posted 22 May 2012 - 07:00 PM

I haven't posted here in a while, but the little note in the New Yorker got me excited for this. I should have tried to watch it live--I've checked for about five days now, but the archive of the video (which at least does run smoothly) stops at 11 minutes, right when the dancing really starts, and they don't seem to have uploaded any of the rest! Extremely frustrating--this is the kind of thing that fascinates me. Hopefully the situation will be dealt with... http://www.ustream.t...corded/22594157

#6 rg

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Posted 23 May 2012 - 03:57 AM

with regard to the archived footage of Works & Process, the situation described above may just be some glitch with the site, but it might also mean that union restrictions prevent the dancing from being posted after the fact.
you might try reaching Works & Process to see if the footage is meant to be archived fully or if it was only meant for the time of the live stream due to restrictions of one kind or another.

#7 sandik

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Posted 23 May 2012 - 07:57 AM

I'm a union supporter, but I really hope that they're not the sticking point here. The work that Doug does with the Stepanov notation has the potential to add significantly to our understanding of the art form in general, and the original intention of the choreographers he studies in specific -- I'd hate to think that we can either protect the rights of performers today or discover more about their heritage.

#8 Amy Reusch

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Posted 23 May 2012 - 08:53 AM

This is what waivers were invented for.... I hope one was signed and filed....

#9 doug

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Posted 23 May 2012 - 09:48 PM

Thanks, everyone. AGMA granted our waiver to have the presentations live streamed and posted in perpetuity. I assume they'll be up before long.

#10 Helene

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Posted 23 May 2012 - 11:01 PM

Great news doug! I'm looking forward to seeing this again, and it was great to see Biasucci and Tisserand in new roles/choreography.

#11 Paul Parish

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Posted 24 May 2012 - 07:50 AM

Great! It will be good to go back and study the differences -- e.g., Florine's variations. They went by so fast!

#12 doug

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Posted 31 May 2012 - 03:29 PM

The complete presentation is now posted:

#13 Helene

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Posted 31 May 2012 - 03:45 PM

That is great news, doug! Thank you for letting us know so quickly.

#14 vipa

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Posted 31 May 2012 - 05:27 PM

That is great news, doug! Thank you for letting us know so quickly.


Thank you - thank you

#15 sandik

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Posted 31 May 2012 - 08:38 PM

It was great to see this again! I don't want to rub anything in, but in Seattle, I think the studio is a wider space than the stage at the Guggenheim -- there was a little more room to expand.


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