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Monday, May 7


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#1 dirac

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Posted 07 May 2012 - 10:27 AM

A preview of Milwaukee Ballet's "Peter Pan."

But sometimes, taking small steps can pay off in a big way – as is the case with Pink's enormously popular "Peter Pan," which the Milwaukee Ballet premiered to sold-out audiences (and disappointed last-minute ticket hopefuls) two years ago.

"I think people just did not believe that it was sold out, and so a lot of people were very disappointed," Pink says. "And so that's why we've brought it back – for all those who didn't get there last time."



#2 dirac

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Posted 07 May 2012 - 10:30 AM

A piece on "First Position" by Carole Mallory in The Huffington Post.

The footage of Joan in the primitive dwelling of his parents in Columbia eating homemade chicken soup with pride because his mother made it for him is touching. He does pirouettes between the clotheslines with mountains in the distance. Later in Manhattan he dances in his sneakers while waiting the subway.



#3 dirac

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Posted 07 May 2012 - 10:32 AM

Reviews of Ballet San Jose in "Cinderella."

The San Jose Mercury News

In San Jose's production of Bournonville's "The Toreador" four years ago, the duo proved themselves brilliant comedians. The fact that here the music-hall inspired physical humor of pratfalls, kicks and stumbles were so much on one note cannot be blamed on them. That's what Stevenson wants. The single instant of real wit came in their attempting ballet steps for the Prince.

The variations for the Seasons were choreographically modest but received fine interpretations, particularly from Amy Marie Briones as the Autumn and Shannon Bynum as the Fairy of Winter. Another scene-stealer came from Akira Takahashi's high-flying Jester. His splits in the air seemed to get higher and longer as the evening progressed.


The San Francisco Chronicle

Even so, taken as a whole, Stevenson's "Cinderella" just doesn't feel like a classic in the grand tradition of story ballets. The real problem lies in the choreographic structure, which can seem noticeably thin in the places where Sergei Prokofiev's sumptuous score - danced here to a recording - is rich with possibilities, but later feels busy with steps when the music seems to call for simplicity. The first act has an overabundance of telegraphing plot details and less of the expressive dancing, of which Stevenson is highly capable.



#4 dirac

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Posted 07 May 2012 - 10:34 AM

A review of Diablo Ballet by Mary Ellen Hunt in The San Francisco Chronicle.

A dozen or so cafe tables, scattered in front of more standard seating, set a more informal atmosphere and brought viewers within inches of the performers. It's got to be a little disquieting to dance the high-octane "Tarantella" that near to your audience, but Hiromi Yamazaki and Robert Dekkers found just the right amount of bounce-and-go mixed with genuine warmth to put together a terrific performance. Expertly staged by Oregon Ballet Theatre director Christopher Stowell and Diablo artistic director Lauren Jonas, this delightful little duet to the music of Louis Gottschalk - performed to recorded music here - is chock-full of deceptively tricky and yet fluffy-looking moments that Dekkers and Yamazaki tossed off with ease. Dekkers had just the right kind of lively, clean jumps and pliant ballon for this kind of piece, while Yamazaki added a flirty joie de vivre.




#5 dirac

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Posted 08 May 2012 - 11:16 AM

A preview of the Joffrey Ballet's New Orleans engagement by Chris Waddington in the Times-Picayune.

Unlike many company leaders, Wheater prefers not to create his own choreography for the troupe. Instead, his focus has been on management and training — skills he honed as the ballet master and assistant director at San Francisco Ballet.

"Choreography is a full time job — and it's not my strength. It requires you to live in your imagination, to focus inward," Wheater said. "I prefer to be in the world, whether working as a fundraiser, or reining in a set designer who hasn't considered the logistical problems of touring."



#6 dirac

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Posted 08 May 2012 - 11:39 AM

An item in brief on Dennis Nahat in the Los Gatos Weekly.

Here he learned firsthand how to set up a ballet company, a process he would employ again and again--as founder of Cleveland Ballet, then Ballet San Jose and now Ballet Theater Venture, his new role in association with the Chinese Performing Arts School.

Nahat will take his fledgling troupe to China this summer, performing in four different cities. Questions remain as to why he was "deposed in a hostile takeover," as he puts it, after 25 years of heading up Ballet San Jose. Nahat also directed Cleveland Ballet for 25 years.




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