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Saturday, April 28


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#1 dirac

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Posted 28 April 2012 - 11:32 AM

Three dancing mothers from Ballet Austin talk about combining a dancing career with motherhood.

Perhaps the biggest difference for the dancers as mothers is what happens when they get pregnant. "When you're pregnant and you're a dancer, you can't exactly do your job," Thompson says.

They all performed through their first trimester. As their bellies grew, they stopped performing but still took classes to keep their bodies and feet strong. They also continued to teach classes or help out with educational programs.



#2 dirac

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Posted 28 April 2012 - 11:33 AM

A review of Nashville Ballet by Amy Stumpfl in The Tennessean.

Part of Nashville Ballet's Contemporary Series, the evening features a double bill of Igor Stravinsky scores, with live music from the Nashville Symphony. Both pieces are known for their wildly imaginative orchestrations and rhythmic structure. And under the baton of guest conductor Nathan Fifield, the music is unsettling but glorious.

The evening opens with Firebird, which is said to have been inspired by a Russian folk tale. Originally, the piece centered on a young prince who encounters an enchanted bird in the forest. But Artistic Director Paul Vasterling has re-imagined the prince as "a sort of everyman" who is on a journey of discovery. The Firebird — a mysterious blend of angel and alien — takes him on a magical adventure that leads to true love.



#3 dirac

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Posted 28 April 2012 - 11:33 AM

A review of the Smuin Ballet by Janos Gereben in The San Francisco Examiner.

Music, too, was adventurous for the two new programs - overamplified unpleasantly and unnecessarily, as usual at Yerba Buena, never mind what some of the dancers say about the need for reverberating the body; maybe for rock, but not for ballet.

The world premiere of Ma Cong's "Through" is set to music by Ryuichi Sakamoto, he of the Yellow Magic Orchestra and experimental electronic fusion, also the composer of the Academy Award winning score for "The Last Emperor," and "Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence," in which he also starred.



#4 dirac

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Posted 28 April 2012 - 11:35 AM

A review of Texas Ballet Theater by Cheryl Callon for TheaterJones.

Like Carl Coomer in the previous weekend, Peter Zweifel doubles as choreographer (premiering The Finding) and dynamic lead dancer (Lambarena). The former work portrays a couple in love who must battle the darker influences pulling one of them away. Lucas Priolo enters the stage carrying Katelyn Clenaghan in a passionate embrace. The intimacy between the two continues in the closeness of the choreography, which could have been achieved without a single touch. The dancers' connection and longing easily become tangible with just a single gaze. Clenaghan's gaze, however, wanders to something unseen, eventually taking her movement away from her partner as well. More dancers appear on stage clad in navy, gray, and eggplant in stark contrast to the couple's costumes of lilac and cream. Something sinister tests the relationship.



#5 dirac

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Posted 28 April 2012 - 11:37 AM

A review of Cincinnati Ballet 's final program of the season by David Lyman in The Cincinnati Enquirer.

By contrast, “Princess and the Pea,” choreographed by artistic director Victoria Morgan, is a boisterous piece of slapstick ballet. Much of mood is set by Steve Reineke and Joe Price’s treatment of maestro Carmon DeLeone’s original score, given a sassy and wonderfully dynamic performance by the Cincinnati Ballet Orchestra. The music is gloriously old-school, like the big-band inspired sounds that emanated from Broadway’s orchestra pits during the 1970s and 1980s.

Visually, the show is downright sumptuous. Alexandre Vasiliev’s sets and costumes are reminiscent of the opulent and densely colored illustrations by Heinrich Lefler and Joseph Urban, masters of the German art nouveau in the early part of the last century.



#6 dirac

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 10:30 AM

An appreciation of Moscelyne Larkin in Tulsa World.

Larkin, along with her late husband Roman Jasinski, were not only famous performers of ballet but they established the Tulsa Civic Ballet - later to become the Tulsa Ballet - that, under their direction, became one of the premier ballet companies in the world.

Larkin also was one of the internationally known five American Indian Ballerinas. All were from Oklahoma and all were of Indian heritage. Along with Larkin, they were: Maria Tallchief, Marjorie Tallchief, Yvonne Chouteau and Rosella Hightower.



#7 dirac

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 10:45 AM

A preview of Ballet Arizona's new work by Richard Nilsen in The Arizona Republic.

"Topia" is something new for Andersen and Ballet Arizona. It is a 45-minute ballet choreographed not only for outdoor performance but for a large stage, set against the Papago Buttes, where nature, Beethoven and the dancers all vie for our attention.

"There is some kind of equilibrium there," Andersen says. "Normally, Beethoven completely overwhelms everything."




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